I got to be doing something wrong.

Nvreloader

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I have this paved road, I have tried twice, both times I failed to make it,
all information is confirmed via GPS and Google Earth measurements.

Information on this road, 6.25 miles long, 971' elevation gain,
starting point is at 4165' elevation (GPS reading of 41*13-32N/118*22-27W) and ending point is at 5136', (summit) (40*12-09N/118*16-22W), google earth sat view readings,
one long steady uphill climb with approximately a 29% grade.

I am using my new Wart Hog Ebike MD 750w dual battery, 48v/30ah,
which I have had just about 30 days now, with the following gears.
This info is from Bikonits site,
Sram X-5 - 9 speeds, DNP 13T-34T with KMC Chain etc.
The tooth count is as follows,
Big main peddle gear = 44T
Big gear on back sprocket =34
next smaller = 30
next smaller =26
next smaller =23
next smaller =20
next smaller =17
next smaller = 15
last smaller =11
I used the 17t, 20t and 23t, starting in 17 and then ascending in gear choice, as it get steeper, and I am running out of leg power, tire pressure is 30 psi, no wind/weather conditions to contend with.

Both times it feels like the bike's battery is out of juice, using the Eco setting, via hard peddling, until I can't peddle any farther, I have not and will not use the thumb throttle, just using Shanks Mare power.
I have found out since these failed attempts, that I have a BAD battery that WILL NOT hold a charge, so I only have 1 battery to explore with, until the new one gets here.

I will attempt another go at this hill, after I charge the 1 remaining battery back up.

IS it me or the bike's fault, yes, I am a new rider, (75yrs old), but I can walk 10-15miles per day, the bike weighs right at 85lbs, loaded with the pack/gear and I weigh in at 200 lbs.
or am I doing something wrong?

Your thoughts and suggestions.......
Tia,
Don
 
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Maybe I am reading this wrong...
Are you saying that as the climb gets steeper you are switching to a smaller cog (higher gear)?
Because that is the opposite of what you are supposed to do. The higher the gear (smaller rear cog), the harder it is for the motor and you.
 
I have this paved road, I have tried twice, both times I failed to make it,
all information is confirmed via GPS and Google Earth measurements.

Information on this road, 6.25 miles long, 971' elevation gain,
starting point is at 4165' elevation (GPS reading of 41*13-32N/118*22-27W) and ending point is at 5136', (summit) (40*12-09N/118*16-22W), google earth sat view readings,
one long steady uphill climb with approximately a 29% grade.

I am using my new Wart Hog Ebike MD 750w dual battery, 48v/30ah,
which I have had just about 30 days now, with the following gears.
This info is from Bikonits site,
Sram X-5 - 9 speeds, DNP 13T-34T with KMC Chain etc.
The tooth count is as follows,
Big main peddle gear = 44T
Big gear on back sprocket =34
next smaller = 30
next smaller =26
next smaller =23
next smaller =20
next smaller =17
next smaller = 15
last smaller =11
I used the bottom 3 gears of 17t, 15t and 11t, starting in 17 and then descending in gear choice, as it get steeper, and I am running out of power, tire pressure is 30 psi, no wind/weather conditions to contend with.

Both times it feels like the bike's battery is out of juice, using the Eco setting, via hard peddling, until I can't peddle any farther, I have not and will not use the thumb throttle, just using Shanks Mare power.
I have found out since these failed attempts, that I have a BAD battery that WILL NOT hold a charge, so I only have 1 battery to explore with, until the new one gets here.

I will attempt another go at this hill, after I charge the 1 remaining battery back up.

IS it me or the bike's fault, yes, I am a new rider, (75yrs old), but I can walk 10-15miles per day,
or am I doing something wrong?

Your thoughts and suggestions.......
Tia,
Don
I dont know that bike or its batteries but I do believe that mid drive motors are the way to go if you want to climb the steepest hills. As far as the gearing goes it should help you climb if you either replace the front sprocket with a smaller one or the rear cassette with a larger range such as 11-42 or even an 11 -46t. To clarify things you want to be on the largest rear sprocket and the smallest front sprocket in order to climb the steepest hills.
 
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As scrambler suggests and you eluded to... It is your fault.
If your gear levers have number marker... You want to be in first or second gear.
Big cog in the rear has the most torque/slowest speed
 
As it gets harder switch to a larger rear cog.
If you are on the 17T rear cog and it gets too hard, switch to 20T or 22T or bigger....
The bigger the rear cog, the more lever you and the motor have to turn the rear wheel (more torque)
 
Hey Guys
I made a mistake,
I start at the 17 t gear and go up to the 23T gear, I'll go change my 1st post.
Sorry about that, new to ebikes etc.
Thanks,
Don
 
Makes more sense :)
That said if you still can't make it on the 23T, keep going up.
You will go slower but should be able to have enough power to climb.

That said 29% is quite steep, and if you can't climb in the lowest gear with 34T (largest rear cog), have you checked what power assist levels are available on the bike, and which one you are using?
Normally you should have several power assists levels to choose from on your display, make sure you are using the highest one.
 
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I can climb 15% grade with 330 lb gross weight unpowered, about 100'. The third one of those my pulse is up to 168 but I stop at the top. That is all of those there are on my route. My bike has 32:32 ratio, which is better than yours at 44:34. I'm age 71. 160 lb of the weight is me, 80 lb groceries, 94 lb bike bags tools water stand racks etc. Don't run your pulse that high unless you've been doing it for decades as I have.
The 1000 w geared hub motor can start on 15% grade with that weight. Mac a geared hub motor manufacturer says their motor will overheat with 1 hour of slow hard climbing. I climb ~80 hills but they are rollers so my motor wears out the gears before it has other problems.
I would say the main help for you is to get a 34 tooth front crank. Get down to 1:1 ratio. Some mountain bikes have 32:48 but they tend to cost $5000 up. I paid $2000 for my yuba before electricity, but with panniers, 2 leg stand, and front basket. It has a triple front crank 32+42+52. Not a popular accessory these days, but necessary to my terrain if the electricity fails. I've had the throttle quit in the rain four times.
 
Guys
I can hear & feel the power of the motor surge when peddling, when I quit peddling,
after about 5-6 seconds the power falls off (no peddling assist) from the motor,
when I start peddling, I again have the surge assist from the motor, is this a normal function?

I only feel this power surge when I peddle up hill and not on flat level ground.
It feels strange etc.
Does it make a difference which mode selection I am in?,
so far I have only used the Eco mode, never tried the sport mode.

Thanks,
Don
 
1- Yes, it is called pedal assist.
There are two ways you can make the Motor help you. By pedaling, or by using the throttle.
If you do nothing, you cannot expect the motor to do something :)

2- If you cannot climb in Eco mode, then of course try Sport mode.

Besides Eco and Sport, do you have power/mode levels to choose from? (check the manual)
Usually, you have several Eco modes and several Sport modes, all with increasing power levels
 
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I don't know how economical these Bafangs are compared to my Yamaha PW, but on a fat tired Haibike Full FatSix, rear cassette gearing of 11 X 36, 10 speed and a dual chain ring of 44 and 30 (estimated), I get in High Power setting a range of up to 40 miles, sea level riding.

That grade you are riding is pretty steep in such a short amount of climb.

My Yamaha LCD display features a power meter column that maxes out when full pedal pressure is put on the pedals/motor internal torque sensor. Does your display feature a power meter that can better act as a guide to getting better range?

In thousands upon thousands of miles pedaled, I found the trick to getting the best mileage per battery charge is to spin the pedals with the thought of putting the less amount of pressure onto the torque sensor. Less pedal pressure = longer battery range. Like you, I am pedaling a fat tired tank at over 60 some pounds. And the way to less pressure is by spinning the pedals as lightly as possible. This tells the torque sensor to not put out as much power vs you lugging up grade in a higher rear gear selection..

Going up hill or upgrade means diminished mileage per charge, not much getting around that. Always aim to spin those pedals on-grade instead of lugging up grade in a higher gear, which will always kill your mileage. When spinning, think 70 rpm at a minimum. Stay in that range and you should return better mileage.

Also, anything above 16 mph will kill mileage potential as you are nothing but a wall going before the wind.....
 
1- Yes, it is called pedal assist.
There are two ways you can make the Motor help you. By pedaling, or by using the throttle.
If you do nothing, you cannot expect the motor to do something :)

2- If you cannot climb in Eco mode, then of course try Sport mode.

Besides Eco and Sport, do you have power/mode levels to choose from? (check the manual)
Usually, you have several Eco modes and several sports mode, all with increasing power levels
Scrambler
Yes, per the manual there is 5 different levels 1 thru 5 in both modes,
I have always used Eco mode and level 1 only.

G rocket
The gear selection levers, has NO marks only a click going up or down.
Thanks Guys,
Don
 
Scrambler
Yes, per the manual there is 5 different levels 1 thru 5 in both modes,
I have always used Eco mode and level 1 only.
Well, here you go, If Eco level one does not cut it, increase the level :)
It is all about finding the proper combination of gear and power level for every situation.
 
Does your display feature a power meter that can better act as a guide to getting better range?
Mike
As far as I have found out, there no type of power meter that I know of, I have only a volt and mileage meters, so far the best I have done is just over 35+ mile per 1 battery.
My average mph is between 10-14 mph, just peddling around on flat ground.
Tia,
Don
 
Mike
As far as I have found out, there no type of power meter that I know of, I have only a volt and mileage meters, so far the best I have done is just over 35+ mile per 1 battery.
My average mph is between 10-14 mph, just peddling around on flat ground.
Tia,
Don
Don, my average speeds on my H-Bike mirrors yours. A Bafang mid drive owner can chime in to speak of your average range per full charge better than I, but off the cuff, I think your mileage per charge is right where it should be for a heavy, fat tired ebike.
 
G rocket
The gear selection levers, has NO marks only a click going up or down.
Thanks Guys,
Don
Regards to that, in time, Don, everything regards to gear shifting and how it feels on the pedals while you are pedaling is an instinctive feel that you will become more familiar with via time in the saddle. Those shift levers with a 1-7 scale for the rider to see is great for weekend type riders. Your particular bike on the other hand, is a bit more serious rig!
 
And regards to viewing a power meter to see how much pressure your torque sensor is putting out while pedaling, the below video, at :50 seconds, shows it does have a power meter. A power meter is a nice to have tool to use. A quick glance down to the power meter while pedaling up grade will show if it's more beneficial to gear down to attain better battery mileage. And in time, the feel of being in a particular gear, while in a flat level or an upgrade situation, will become second nature to you.

Not sure if the display in the video matches your bike, but it's important to know which display you have so you can check to see on youtube what the features are within the display......

 
Mike
Ya, I bought it for a hunting bike, slow and quite as compared to my ATV,
which I now use as a pack mule, being a Honda Rubicon it does a very good job,
I am getting too OLD to pack out quarters any more.
Hopefully I can set this Wart Hog up for packing quarters out.
So far, I less than 100 miles on it and still learning all it's quirks etc.
That is the display meter on this bike. I'll watch that video ASAP.
Thanks,
Don
 
Regards to that, in time, Don, everything regards to gear shifting and how it feels on the pedals while you are pedaling is an instinctive feel that you will become more familiar with via time in the saddle. Those shift levers with a 1-7 scale for the rider to see is great for weekend type riders. Your particular bike on the other hand, is a bit more serious rig!
Mine only has a 1 and a 7
If I scrape off the numbers... can I ride with you? 🙃
 
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