2021–2022 Riese & Müller Homage

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Hi,

As a future owner of the homage I was very happy to read so many positve statements about that bike. For the last 20 years I was a passionate recumbent biker and never had a normal e-bike before. Why did I change my mind?

In Germany there exists the possibility to lease an e-bike by your employer. This financing model is very interesting, because you can save a lot of income tax that way. Before this tax saving model has been introduced, buying a premium e-bike like the homage remained a dream, now it became an option. Another factor was Corona. Going into the office every day is no more necessary. As a consequence using a bike instead of public means of transportation became more attractive. But using my recumbent for more than 20 kilometers means a lot of transpiration (I tried it two times) and I don't like showering in the office building.

For me as a recumbent biker there can’t be too much comfort at a bike. At first I tried to get an electric recumbent with a Pinion, but unfortunately this combination didn’t work. Hence I finally opted for the Homage which is the only fully in the market with a low step-through. Since I got a Rohloff already at my recumbent and I really love it, I chose the Rohloff at the Homage too. Combined with the gates belt drive this gear shift varaiant promises minimum maintenance effort(, which is beside comfort another important aspect for me.) And I really appreciate this tip-tronic like electric assisted gear changing mechanism. My only question so far: Are you happy with the original saddle? As a recumbent biker this was not an issue in the past for me, but for normal bikers it’s a big issue as I know. Hence, who has still got the original one and who has already purchased another one?

Bye
 
Hi,

As a future owner of the homage I was very happy to read so many positve statements about that bike. For the last 20 years I was a passionate recumbent biker and never had a normal e-bike before. Why did I change my mind?

In Germany there exists the possibility to lease an e-bike by your employer. This financing model is very interesting, because you can save a lot of income tax that way. Before this tax saving model has been introduced, buying a premium e-bike like the homage remained a dream, now it became an option. Another factor was Corona. Going into the office every day is no more necessary. As a consequence using a bike instead of public means of transportation became more attractive. But using my recumbent for more than 20 kilometers means a lot of transpiration (I tried it two times) and I don't like showering in the office building.

For me as a recumbent biker there can’t be too much comfort at a bike. At first I tried to get an electric recumbent with a Pinion, but unfortunately this combination didn’t work. Hence I finally opted for the Homage which is the only fully in the market with a low step-through. Since I got a Rohloff already at my recumbent and I really love it, I chose the Rohloff at the Homage too. Combined with the gates belt drive this gear shift varaiant promises minimum maintenance effort(, which is beside comfort another important aspect for me.) And I really appreciate this tip-tronic like electric assisted gear changing mechanism. My only question so far: Are you happy with the original saddle? As a recumbent biker this was not an issue in the past for me, but for normal bikers it’s a big issue as I know. Hence, who has still got the original one and who has already purchased another one?

Bye
I have only ridden my new Homage a few days or so but believe the saddle is quite good. It is very comfortable after I adjusted the saddle a bit, both in terms of tilt and sliding it either forward or backwards after a little riding a bit then readjusting it. It is a bid wider, but not bad at all in terms of the riding.
 
Are you happy with the original saddle?
App, I chose the comfort package. As a result my 2021 Homage Touring (derailleur) has a wider saddle than that on the 2019 Homage Rohloff. I'm glad I chose the wider saddle (easily changed had I had regrets).

I quite like the way my hands are positioned on the swept-back handlebar (comfort package option). Unfortunately, there is a trade-off: a more upright position. Changing handlebars is decidedly more difficult than swapping saddles!

Derailleur instead of Rohloff? No regrets, there. I often ride through steep gullies, and being able to get up speed on the descent (high gear) and then click down through five or six gears on the way up is a joy that only the derailleur provides: not so with a Rohloff.

For me, the Rohloff's delay in changing gears is its main drawback.
 
Interesting, since I did buy the Rohloff which I am just learning having used derailluers for the better part of over 50 years. It turns out that if one holds the switch for 3 seconds, it will change 3 gears up or down which is excellent while out on a ride, or so it seems…
 
Are you happy with the original saddle?
[/QUOTE]

I have the comfort package with the wider saddle and swept back handlebars. With the upright riding style and lots of your weight pressing down, the saddle setup is crucial. Also the saddle will not mould to your body and therefore does not offer the Brooks style experience. After 98km yesterday on the Brisbane Valley Rail Trail without any issues, I may be changing my mind about swapping the saddle.

One matter of concern on my fully loaded Homage has been handlebar wobble. This occurs at very low speeds when performing a tight turn or making a steep descent. Over the last two days in these situations, I have been employing various tactics (work in progress):
- Leaning forwards on the bars.
- Not over compensating if a wobble begins.
- On descents, feathering the brakes and not going too slow.

The wobble issue was a real surprise to me although, when you think about it, loading up the back must affect the handling characteristics of any bike.
 

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HI folks. First time poster. We are looking at buying a bike for my wife - but with Covid and lockdowns in NSW/Australia - we are unable to visit a shop or test ride bikes - she is 5'7" ~ 171cm so in the Homage, we figure the 49cm frame is the choice, with comfort handles etc. Reason for me check in here is that given we can't ride any - we are after the most upright riding style as possible - so the Nevo3 appeals on paper as it looks like it is more upright than the Homage. Can anyone comment on this from actual experience? Would you think there is a difference in lean between Nevo3 2021 and the current Homage but with comfort and cockpit etc? Happy to go the extra $$ on the Homage as a dual suspension would be most ideal for her - but just unsure whether Homage is really an upright style or is just a bit less sporty than a full suspension MTB style. Hope that all makes sense and really appreciating the owner feedback so far. (I had a birdy a million years ago so would be great to get a R&M back under our roof).
 
If one holds the switch for 3 seconds, it will change 3 gears up or down.
Four, not three.

To check this for yourself: engage either #1 or #14 and then give a long press.

With the Rohloff E-14 a long press changes four gears. Actually, one gear is changed (up or down), plus three more (equals 4).
  • Long Press : 1 + 3 = 4 gears
  • Extra Long Press : 1 + 3 + 3 = 7 gears
  • Very Long Press : 1 + 3 + 3 + 3 = 10 gears
  • Extra Very Long Press : 1 + 3 + 3 + 3 + 3 = 13 gears
 
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I was out for a ride yesterday and thought that a longer press would change whatever gear I was in would provide 6 additional gears, but thank you for this quick note which will be most helpful for me, in terms of practice. I have found myself, with a pause at pedaling when hitting a change in gear, my assumption would be that such a pause requires more time off the pedal, so to speak?
 
Wow, a lot of replies.

I think I will see, whether I will get problems with the original saddle, or not. If need be a brooks saddle could be worth a try. Also the Ergon St core evo.

Regarding the Rohloff I already arrived at a decision. Last week I made a test ride with the E14, which I was very happy with. Gear changing was very smooth and quick or let's say quick enough for me. Changing gears at my recumbent is not faster. Of course I know how to use derailleurs but I'm not very experienced with this type of gear shift, as I told. Another important argument for me ist the belt drive, which is only available for the Rohloff or the Nuvinci. Originally I favorised an e-bike with a Pinion gear shift and a Neodrives Engine, because a mid-engine means high wear and tear (Verschleiß) for the chain and the pinion. But with the belt drive this is no more an important issue. Also dirt is a minor problem for the belt drive. When I'm going to office by bike, I try to avoid the normal roads. In Munich I can use the ways along the river Isar and through the Englisch Garden, which are sometimes in a rough condition. This was the main reason I looked for a fully. Consequently I chose the RX package which is not compatible with the comfort package.
 
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I love my Rohloff, but I do wish it could change gears while pedaling sometimes... especially going uphill. :)

I have had my bike for 2 months now (700 miles) and getting ready to ride another week-long 300 mile journey on the GAP trail from Pittsburgh PA to Cumberland MD and back with some friends this next week.

I have noticed recently that it seems that my bike pedals drag from time to time. Not sure if the bike pedals are lower or I am just more used to the bike and take sharper turns. At the lowest position, my pedals are about 3.25 inches from the ground. Is that the normal height?

I am coming off of a 29er and the pedals are higher (didn't measure) and never had them drag.
 
Gear switching when you are climbing a hill is a good point. Fortunately my primary use case differs: The bike will serve as a commuter between my home and my office. Although the distance is more than 20 km there are no hills (yeah). Just one or two bridges to climb. Living in the Münchener Schotterebene (translated Gravel Plain of Munich) has got some advantages. Hence gear switching when the bike stands still is much more important for me.

Regarding your pedal problem, I can't help you now. This is also an issue, which you don't have with a recumbent. (Writing this I gradually become aware, that switching from a recumbent to a normal bike is a little bit weird. I will face a lot of problems, which I haven't got before. Similair to marrying. :cool:) But when my Homage will have arrived I will pay attention on this matter.
 
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I know i sound like a broken record but it's a pity no new R&M owners get to experience a manual shift Rohloff :)
 
I know i sound like a broken record but it's a pity no new R&M owners get to experience a manual shift Rohloff :)


Can I assume that "the moment the notch can be felt in the twist shifter" is now replaced by taking your eyes off the road and seeing the OK screen on my Kiox? If correct, that seems like a backward step.
 
Can I assume that "the moment the notch can be felt in the twist shifter" is now replaced by taking your eyes off the road and seeing the OK screen on my Kiox? If correct, that seems like a backward step.
Yes, but I've become so used to using the E-14/Kiox combination on my 2019 Homage that it isn't necessary to look at the Kiox's screen.

For me, any shifting disadvantage that the E-14 might have is offset by not having an uncomfortable 'cotton reel' as part of my right-hand grip. On my old non-electric folding bike (Airnimal Black Rhino Rohloff) my right hand, between thumb and first finger, was uncomfortable for 100% of the time (excluding the time spent taking this photo!). I later changed the grip to a Rohloff-specific Ergon grip, but the basic problem remained.

Rohloff Twist Grip


The pre-2019 Homage's manual Rohloff arrangement will have been different, but mainly so in the details.

Of passing interest (so he says as he takes a swipe at the hornets' nest), note the speed (40 km/h), cadence (94 – too high to be sustainable) and gear (#14 – highest).

Unfortunately, this is typical of Rohloff-equipped bikes/ebikes: an emphasis on extraordinarily low gearing rather than 'a bit higher and a bit lower' than everyone else. I've never genuinely needed #1 or #2 gear on my Homage Rohloff (of course, I've used them!).
 
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I need to look into this I think. Thanks!
Hi @Jim Cook my wife and I have 155mm Hope cranks, and the extra ground clearance is definitely noticeable. Slight downside is the standing platform size, which because the pedals are closer together, the stance is narrower. Not a biggie, and almost certainly not an issue on a Homage where you won't often be out of the saddle. Make sure your LBS tunes the motor for the shorter cranks - there is a setting in the Bosch software the LBS has access too.
 
Yes, but I've become so used to using the E-14/Kiox combination on my 2019 Homage that it isn't necessary to look at the Kiox's screen.

For me, any shifting disadvantage that the E-14 might have is offset by not having an uncomfortable 'cotton reel' as part of my right-hand grip. On my old non-electric folding bike (Airnimal Black Rhino Rohloff) my right hand, between thumb and first finger, was uncomfortable for 100% of the time (excluding the time spent taking this photo!). I later changed the grip to a Rohloff-specific Ergon grip, but the basic problem remained.

View attachment 97011

The pre-2019 Homage's manual Rohloff arrangement will have been different, but mainly so in the details.

Of passing interest, note the speed (40 km/h), cadence (94 – too high to be sustainable) and gear (#14 – highest). Unfortunately, this is typical of Rohloff-equipped bikes/ebikes: an emphasis on extraordinarily low gearing rather than 'a bit higher and a bit lower' than everyone else. I've never genuinely needed #1 or #2 gear on my Homage Rohloff (of course, I've used them!).
Interesting to see @David Berry

I have similar issue with my Enviolo hub - need a cadence of 100rpm to maintain 40kph+ …. I was led to believe the Rohloff higher gear ratios would fix this and allow better utilisation of the high speed Bosch 4 motor that doesn’t cut out until 45kph….

hmmm you’ve got me thinking here now!
 
Interesting to see @David Berry

I have similar issue with my Enviolo hub - need a cadence of 100rpm to maintain 40kph+ …. I was led to believe the Rohloff higher gear ratios would fix this and allow better utilisation of the high speed Bosch 4 motor that doesn’t cut out until 45kph….

hmmm you’ve got me thinking here now!
In my year of using the Rohloff E14 (on an HS bike) I find I don't want nor need to ride much above 35km/hr.

Once I became familiar with the gear change it has become second nature and I don't find it a problem, including riding on fairly steep slopes (eg the Rapaki, Sam). I use assist levels and gears in combination. I imagine a competitive mountain biker might think otherwise.

I suspect in the Rohloff versus Enviolo question one needs to consider the greater transmission efficiency of the Rohloff.

I guess it all comes down to riding style and expectation.

Cheers

Peter
 
Unfortunately, this is typical of Rohloff-equipped bikes/ebikes: an emphasis on extraordinarily low gearing rather than 'a bit higher and a bit lower' than everyone else. I've never genuinely needed #1 or #2 gear on my Homage Rohloff (of course, I've used them!).
This is interesting. At my recumbent I sometimes use the first gear of the Rohloff, especially when there is a higher gradient to climb. Several years after I had purchased the recumbent, I even exchanged the 14 teeth pinion at the rear by a 15 teeth pinion because the gear ratio of the 1st gear was still too high to my taste. On the other hand I can't remember, when I used the 13th or the 14th gear the last time. The reason could be, that I normally ride with a cadence of at least 80/min. Doing so I follow an advice of a former physical education teacher, who recommended high cadences, which are better for the knees. I have recently read in a newspaper, that professional bikers have got a cadence of around 100/min.
 
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