Shimano EP 801, throttle??

MinnBobber

Active Member
Does the Shimano EP 801 have “throttle capability “?
I have never wanted E throttle on any of my road Ebikes but getting an e-mountain bike.

I could see where throttle on an E fattie with studded tires might be very handy????

Winter snow and doing trials riding thru woods in fresh snow…??? If you get stuck and dismount…

Please post your experience with E studded fatties and what they can tackle.

Picture is of E fattie bike rental in Prague. The ride of a lifetime !
 

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Does the Shimano EP 801 have “throttle capability “?
I have never wanted E throttle on any of my road Ebikes but getting an e-mountain bike.

I could see where throttle on an E fattie with studded tires might be very handy????

Winter snow and doing trials riding thru woods in fresh snow…??? If you get stuck and dismount…

Please post your experience with E studded fatties and what they can tackle.

Picture is of E fattie bike rental in Prague. The ride of a lifetime !
That’s likely not going to happen. You would be more inclined to acquire a mid drive Bafang if you really want a throttle.

I’m not sure what if any benefit a throttle would provide in snow particularly if it’s deep or soft as the bike would simply get bogged down similar to how a RWD vehicle would react by spinning its tires. You would end up getting off the bike in those conditions regardless. A bike with walk mode might be more efficient in getting you out of tight spots but I’ve always relied on proper gearing and a slow methodical approach when climbing steeper grades (if the ground conditions aren’t in the best shape) while allowing the power of the motor to do the bulk of the work. That being said, even fat bikes have their limits when the snow is just too deep and progress is halted as the bike becomes slower and more sluggish.

For that past 1 ½ winters, I’ve relied on my 2nd gen EP8 powered Norco Bigfoot VLT which has seen me crush through all sorts of conditions.

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It’s a significant improvement from the emtb shod with narrower 2.25 Schwalbe ISP studded tires that I used to ride on. In fact, I can’t recall how many days (without the capability of a fatty) that were lost due to varying conditions which prevented me from getting out on the trails.

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The Norco’s 4.5” wide carbide studded 45 North Wrathchilds certainly have plenty of grip on ice but its their wider stance, ability to run at extremely low psi and larger contact patch which gives one the ability to ride on top of snow and that is typically what sets a properly winter equipped fat bike apart from the rest of the field. Studded tires are terrific on hardpack or ice but do little to help when the ground is far less compact. If you have access to groomed trails all the better.

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I’ve seen others enjoy riding their fatbikes during the summer months here but I personally get more pleasure ripping up the trails on my FS emtb which happens to be my tool of choice. To each his own.
 
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Thanks.
I was thinking a walking speed throttle would help for winter, snow trials, bike riding conditions. Cross country where you might get bogged down in a ravine and could walk next to the bike to get it safely out.
On My Rd., Ebikes, I have never wanted a throttle, but it might be handy here
 
I tend to agree with you. I had two bikes with throttles and found it a useful help from time to time. They add merrily a few grams so it isn't a heavy item.
Yes I miss a throttle on my new bike.
 
My throttle allows me to ride 2 mph on my rutted grass driveway at my summer camp. Pedal assist minimum, 11 mph. Too fast for even the rutted berms of state hwy 3. I ditched the crank pickup of that useless feature. I do not see a problem riding slowly in snow with a throttle. I ride in snow some, although I leave the battery in the garage in months where it might freeze. I have 2.1" knobby tires, and do not ride on ice.
Mid drives for sale in Europe will not offer a throttle, as they are banned in many countries there. I ride a geared hub motor, which is adequate for the 77 hills of my commute to/from summer camp. Great help on the steeper hills with 60 lb groceries or ag supplies. Geared hub motors will not lug slowly up a steep grade for an hour or more. They can burn the winding. Not for the Rocky or Sierra mountains. I do not ride to summer camp in cold weather. There is no heat in my drafty trailer out there.
 
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