Tongsheng assist levels

BTW testing my 36v without the speed sensor didn't seem to affect assist one way or another but without it the motor would shut off every few minutes unless actively pedaling (as when descending long grades). That was with the xh18 display, very annoying. You can always hook your speed sensor up, it only takes a few minutes to install, anyone could do it without tools other than a flat blade screwdriver for the spoke magnet.
 
I am just starting to ride my 36V as riding season ends soon .. so I can't/won't offer any real world experience but don't forget the gearing difference between the bikes. What I can say is on my bike lowest boost level just lightens the bike a bit for flats, but doesn't feel or sound very boosted. Level 2 seems about right, and I don't know anything about battery life yet ...
 
I believe it-- I've now gotten over 37 miles on moderately hilly terrain without hitting the reserve on a 90% charge. So even here, I might get over 40 miles.

However, I did go back to my other bike since the Marin got a flat, and there is no question: The little 40nm Shimano E5000 on the Motobecane provides far more assistance than the TSDZ2B tooling around my 4-mile fitness route, which has three steep hills. I was really surprised, but that has got to be part of why the motor is more efficient: I'm supplying more power. The battery fade on the Tongshen is also noticeably worse and kicks in sooner.

The Tongshen has a far higher top speed on flat terrain-- like, 7 MPH faster-- but it does require significant effort to get there. The Tongshen also provides more boost on the steepest hills in situations where the E5000 simply would not have enough grunt.

My opinion may change after I make some changes to the gears, hopefully also the chain ring, and go tubeless. Right now, it's not like I would prefer one motor or the other, they are just very different.
Post up if you ever do test install the speed sensor with spoke magnet. If so don't forget to check and make sure your wheel diameter setting is correct for your bike wheel size.
FWIW I wanted to test my 48v5ah yard tool battery with my 48v tsdz2. The tool battery is only 43v nominal (rated max 48v, or in reality 49.5v). Installed on my 20" folder with wheel size not correctly set it seemed anemic but when set to correct 20"diameter the assist was much improved throughout all 5 levels (actually a bit more than I wanted on the lowest setting) even with the low voltage/low capacity battery. It only takes a few minutes to install the speed sensor and calibrate for wheel size, bonus is that you then get odometer and speedometer readings - I find the odometer to be especially useful. I've found both to be very accurate.
 
Post up if you ever do test install the speed sensor with spoke magnet. If so don't forget to check and make sure your wheel diameter setting is correct for your bike wheel size.
FWIW I wanted to test my 48v5ah yard tool battery with my 48v tsdz2. The tool battery is only 43v nominal (rated max 48v, or in reality 49.5v). Installed on my 20" folder with wheel size not correctly set it seemed anemic but when set to correct 20"diameter the assist was much improved throughout all 5 levels (actually a bit more than I wanted on the lowest setting) even with the low voltage/low capacity battery. It only takes a few minutes to install the speed sensor and calibrate for wheel size, bonus is that you then get odometer and speedometer readings - I find the odometer to be especially useful. I've found both to be very accurate.
Good ideas-- today, I'm hoping to get the (flat) rear wheel off and see if I can remove some gears and push the chain line outwards with spacers. I'll also have a look at the cassette and chain ring and see if it looks like there is unusual wear-- the friction I feel in the motor sounds like it is internal, but this motor is much louder than the E5000, so maybe I'm just hearing something unfamiliar and chain line friction is more of a problem than I thought.

In any event, getting proper gearing (both at the cassette, and at the crank, if the 38t narrow-wide actually will work, should help the torque sensor work better, so it should help even if it doesn't solve the problem.

I will circle back to Pedaluma and make sure that he set the wheel size correctly-- I'm certain he did-- but can't that be set without installing the speed sensor? If not, then yeah-- then it has to be installed and that has to be changed. I do have a separate speedometer and odometer that seem to be pretty accurate, that's how I am figuring the battery range.

I know it's insane, but last week, it felt like the Motobecane was jealous and competing with the Marin build. "Oh, so you think that bike is faster because it can take that easy little straightaway at 23 MPH? But I can take this little hill at 17 MPH instead of 14 MPH! Gee, looks like we got to the meeting 90 seconds faster, doesn't it, and you're not sweating quite so hard."
 
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