Do You Wear a Wristwatch When You Ride?

Sounds like me. i broke watch after watch.
,.. the latest versions automatically sense.

The latest versions of everything we buy now are designed to be thrown out after a pre-determined amount of time.
Planned obsolescence.

My car came with a 5 year rust through warranty.

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It's not a "rust" warranty, it's a "rust through" warranty.
Bubbled up paint doesn't count.
The paint has to fall off to show the rust underneath.

Countless people from my car forum noticed rust bubbling up on their cars after just about 5 years that didn't rust through until 3-6 months after the warranty expired.

Kudos to those engineers who can design a car that will rust through exactly 3-6 months after the warranty expires!!

That takes some real wizardry to pull that off!!

If you got your car treated with undercoating to prevent the rust, you void the warranty.




I had to put the key in the ignition and turn it to accessory or start the car to see what time it was.

So I stuck a watch in my car too. 😂

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A tri-athlete told me about an idea of running assistance with heart rate. When you heart rate reaches a certain level you start getting assist, the higher the rate the more assist. I like simple. Not having the tech run me.
Sometimes, the high tech approach might be safer, especially when riding... the following isn't the best for responsive braking :D
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I think that if you're afraid to leave the house without having your vitals monitored and controlled by a computer then you should just buy a Peloton and pretend.
You could have it programmed to call 911 if you stroke out.

They'll know exactly where to find you.


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I'd rather be out there just dealing with it.

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There's just something about actually being out there doing it.
 
I have a Garmin Forerunner 55 that I wear each day. I use it to track runs and rides. I used it every day, when I first got my ebike, but now I don’t track my rides anymore. I already know that I’m getting good exercise with my commute.

My old face watch (Timex Forrester) now lives on my handlebars. Since I commute for work, I like to know the time. I wear long sleeves when I ride and can’t be bothered to roll up my sleeve and check my wrist while riding. I need both hands on the grips when riding along traffic.
 
I think that if you're afraid to leave the house without having your vitals monitored and controlled by a computer then you should just buy a Peloton and pretend.
You could have it programmed to call 911 if you stroke out.

They'll know exactly where to find you.

I'd rather be out there just dealing with it.

There's just something about actually being out there doing it.
That escalated quickly!

With that approach, why have a bike with a circuit board and a battery? :)
 
I have a Garmin Forerunner 55 that I wear each day. I use it to track runs and rides. I used it every day, when I first got my ebike, but now I don’t track my rides anymore.

I don't track my rides but I keep my eye on the odometer.
I always fully charge and drain my battery for a ride and know that I can always go at least 60 km if I keep my speed down to about 22 kph.

I already know that I’m getting good exercise with my commute.

I don't get any exercise, but I do get out of the house.
It usually takes about 2½-3 hours to drain my battery.
 
That all misses the point of a heart rate monitor. In practice you’d never use it to make sure you aren’t exceeding your maximum heart rate (in practice that is harder than you think).

The Big Reason is that you can build endurance quickly with about two hours of Zone 2 (60-70 percent of max HR). Do that three or so times a week for a couple of months and you will have dramatically increased your endurance. Just slamming it every day doesn’t have the same effect and might even make you weaker.

You can tell you are in Zone 2 if you can just barely keep a conversation going while you exercise, and the person you are talking to can tell you are exercising.

On a bike , in practice over realistic terrain it can be challenging to stay in the Zone.
 
Wether biking or running, elevation in my area makes staying in zones very hard. I find I'm mostly is zone 2 (30-50%). Other times, I'm in zone 3. Feels pretty good to ride regularly. My total ride is 15-20 minutes, so I'm not in the zones for too long. When running, though, I'm usually going for about an hour. My typical zones are 3 and 4, but I also hit zone 2 when I realize my heart rate is nearing max and start deep breathing to regulate. I don't run with music so I can focus better on my stepping and breathing. This is why I like my watch.
 
I used to wear an expensive present my wife got me while I was riding. My 800.00 Casio Mud Master. That's until my big crash on top of R/R tracks. I thought I could cross the tracks at a slight angle... and man was I wrong. The last thing I remember (like slow motion) was watching my left wrist with my new watch smashing into the Rocks and slag that's between the tracks.

It took me what seemed like forever before I could get up, and the only thing I was concerned about was my watch. After I cleaned it off with some water I realized it didn't have not one scratch or nick on it. I was so happy no damage was done, that now I just baby it. So now I just keep my phone in my pocket. It works out okay for me because at about every 10 miles or so I need to take a brief 'Butt" Break... And I would just check my phone at that time.
 
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