Review Ride1Up Prodigy V2 XR (chain version)

Sefutau2020

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Northern VA
I acquired the Prodigy V2 XR chain version, and it boasts a premium feel, offering solid stability at high speeds. The attention to detail at this price point is remarkable, drawing parallels to my Specialized Vado 4. While not an apples-to-apples comparison due to the Vado's larger battery and less powerful motor, the V2 stands out with its Brose 90nm (380%) motor, surpassing the Vado 4’s Brose 70nm (320%). Riding mostly in ECO mode, I estimate around 85 miles on a single charge at roughly 60% support, with a preference for the Tour setting at 100%. The 4-piston disc brakes outshine those on my Trek 8s, and Ride1up has crafted a quality e-bike with notable features, including a well-performing "unbranded" air fork. While desiring a light-off feature and ANT+ support for my Garmin, I acknowledge the absence of these features on my Trek 8s, which was priced at $4500.00 (USD). The Prodigy V2 operates whisper-silently, and its speed, reaching 28mph effortlessly even in Sport mode, makes it a formidable choice. Considering the competitive price, Ride1up's offering will be challenging to beat. Without hesitation, I highly recommend the Prodigy V2 and would purchase it again.
 

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Nice review. Those are good looking bikes that I took a look at. My problem is the one size fits all geometry. This is why I prefer actual, long established bike companies like Specialized that make different frame sizes as opposed to just using longer or shorter seat posts. I have a Vado in an XL that fits my 6’3 frame perfectly. The Prodigy looks like it would be a bit too small for me.
 
Nice review. Those are good looking bikes that I took a look at. My problem is the one size fits all geometry. This is why I prefer actual, long established bike companies like Specialized that make different frame sizes as opposed to just using longer or shorter seat posts. I have a Vado in an XL that fits my 6’3 frame perfectly. The Prodigy looks like it would be a bit too small for me.
Thanks for the comments. Yes, this is a nice bike, especially for the price. I am 6'2, and it is a tight fit. I purchased a longer seat post (400mm), and that solved that problem. I did advise another rider in a separate forum concerning which bike to pick; the Prodigy V2 or the Vado 4. The Vado 4 at $3250 is the best deal going. The V2 is $2400, but what you do get for the $850 difference is Mission Control, Specialized's dealer network, and the massive 710w battery. Those three to me are worth the extra pennies....yet, folks that are on a budget, and who don't travel to far on their rides (20 to 30 miles), the V2 is hard to beat in my opinion. I also own a Trek Allant 8s, and still the Vado 4 is my favorite.
 
I am considering the Prodigy V2 step-through w/ the CVT (Gates belt). Saw a YouTube review that they got more miles than estimated. Only going 20-30 would concern me. Why do you think it would only get 20-30? Appreciate your thoughts on that.
 
I am considering the Prodigy V2 step-through w/ the CVT (Gates belt). Saw a YouTube review that they got more miles than estimated. Only going 20-30 would concern me. Why do you think it would only get 20-30? Appreciate your thoughts on that.
Greetings. Let me try to explain. I have seen similar videos on YouTube in reference to the Prodigy V2, claiming as high as 73 miles in TOUR mode. In my testing, I have only registered roughly 50 miles in Tour mode (almost 100% support), which is still excellent. ECO mode, which is almost 60% motor support, for me, would yield an estimated 80 miles on one charge. Now, I am north of 250lbs, so my range may be lower than others. I also used to own a Giant Fast Road EX Pro with 80nm and a 500w battery, and the Prodigy V2's current range, matches that ebike's. The Prodigy V2 is more powerful than the Giant, but is noticeably cheaper, so the Prodigy V2 really is a good purchase. I have no regrets. Hope that helps.
 
I've noticed that my travel speed through the air is related to my battery usage. Going faster (or against a strong headwind) reduces my range. Easy, leisurely pedaling contributes to longer range, similar to how driving an automobile at a slower speed on the highway will add range. This is one factor to consider in anecdotal range claims since everyone's different and the conditions they're pedaling in are different.
 
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