Encinitas City Council declares emergency for e-bikes, bicycles

Cars and theft are significantly bigger problems with e-bikes than speeding on e-bikes but nobody declares en emergency about those two issues.
 

The two biggest problems with electric bikes aren’t even about e-bikes​



Notice there is no mention of battery fires being a problem for ebikes.
an article written by an e-bike maker, i wouldn’t think so 😂

the two problems they mention are definitely major problems in many places.
 
the two problems they mention are definitely major problems in many places.
The article also addressed a 3rd indirect problem — bike security at potential destinations. But it missed an important 4th — keeping cars and especially pedestrians off the bike infrastructure once it's built.

Lots of good to excellent bike infrastructure here in coastal San Diego County. Billions (yes, billions) have already been spent. But near the beaches, I have encounters with invading pedestrians and cars on every ride. Some of the runners don't even bother moving to the side. Bikes going the wrong way are pretty common, too.

The last 8 years have seen an explosion in the number of Americans who think rules don't apply to them. (Wonder where they got that idea?) I see them on bikes, too — especially ebikes.

So local governments with the will and money to build bike infrastructure aren't enough. To have nice things, we also need governments willing and able to enforce the associated rules on cars, cyclists, and pedestrians alike.

Good luck with that in this civil climate.
 
Slightly off topic, but this thread reminded my of driving in my car yesterday on a major 4 lane roadway (speed limit 45 or50) and an Lectric XP in the fast lane doin 20 with both lanes full of traffic. I had to swerve into the passing lane to avoid him, and a huge semi behind me stopped all traffic by slowing down to 15 mph or so. I saw this from my rear view mirror. It looked like an order guy or gal with full motorcycle helmet and protective face covering just cruising along like he belonged there. He or she was not pedaling and seemed obvlivious as to what was going on around them. These are the kinds of situations that cast ebikers in a bad light and deservedly so...
 
Slightly off topic, but this thread reminded my of driving in my car yesterday on a major 4 lane roadway (speed limit 45 or50) and an Lectric XP in the fast lane doin 20 with both lanes full of traffic. I had to swerve into the passing lane to avoid him, and a huge semi behind me stopped all traffic by slowing down to 15 mph or so. I saw this from my rear view mirror. It looked like an order guy or gal with full motorcycle helmet and protective face covering just cruising along like he belonged there. He or she was not pedaling and seemed obvlivious as to what was going on around them. These are the kinds of situations that cast ebikers in a bad light and deservedly so...
Yes, some pretty stupid cyclists here as well. For bicycles to replace a significant number of cars, every group involved will have to clean up its act. Firmly believe that it's in our best interest to lead the way.
 
i do wonder why there would be such regional differences. most roadies here stick to roads, because MUP are generally just not that great for riding far and fast. the one or two that get frequently used by “serious” cyclists here are because there is no safe connecting road. they are heavily signed for speed and other restrictions and bad behavior by cyclists seems incredibly rare.
That’s pretty much the same in my area, (rural New Hampshire and Vermont).

I used to do training rides in the Greenfield Massachusetts area and the riders and drivers seemed to coexist beautifully, (that was about 25 years ago. I don’t have any recent experience in that area). There were no bike paths or bike lanes in that area, but we wouldn’t have used them if there had been.

Most roadies that I have known prefer the freedom of the roads, regardless of the traffic. I still enjoy my road bike and the freedom of the open road.
 
Needs a companion article or two about the two things that ebike manufacturers can fix that might help rider safety ... I suggest:

1. High speeds ... many ebike sales target older, inexperienced riders with often fragile bones. A crash that a 20 year old can walk away from can be fatal a 70 year old.
2. Battery fires ... they can take out an entire block of apartments with one bad cell.
 
That’s pretty much the same in my area, (rural New Hampshire and Vermont).

I used to do training rides in the Greenfield Massachusetts area and the riders and drivers seemed to coexist beautifully, (that was about 25 years ago. I don’t have any recent experience in that area). There were no bike paths or bike lanes in that area, but we wouldn’t have used them if there had been.

Most roadies that I have known prefer the freedom of the roads, regardless of the traffic. I still enjoy my road bike and the freedom of the open road.

and yet, we have other posters from your part of the world who claim that Lycra clad roadies are routinely running down or nearly running down or at least maiming people with their snobbery. observer bias or dishonesty, who knows.
 
I know I've talked about this before, but when I go back to New York and ride my old acoustic bike, it takes two or three rides before the necessary part of my brain lights up-- the part that can process and visualize the physics of so many powered and unpowered vehicle, pedestrians, and joggers traveling in unpredictable directions in the same space. Particularly on the Park Drive near Bethesda Fountain around 72nd street, where there is so much merging.

There's that one wonderful, magical moment where everything clicks, and you can just see all the vectors in your head intuitively: "Ah, I can actually keep going 25 MPH if I go right there, in that one particular gap in the traffic..." And if everyone does what they are supposed to do? It's so beautiful and exciting.

But if you are daydreaming, looking at your phone, worried about something your boss or wife or boyfriend said-- total mayhem. And before I get that click, I'm just creeping along at 7 MPH thinking, "This is crazy. How did I ever do this?"

It is much harder now, with electric vehicles, and 28+ MPH tips the balance to complete chaos. I actually think it's safer in places like New York City, where we've been doing some version of this dance for over half a century, than in Encinitas or Manhattan Beach, where there isn't the same kind of wheeled culture.

In some ways, the worst was the disco era in New York, with roller skaters with headphones-- they're dancing, and their movement was much more unpredictable than roller bladers. Someone could just bust a move, whirl around, and spin through three lanes of traffic with absolutely no warning. THAT was crazy at any speed.
 
My own observations about MUPs (and rail trails) is that the actual amount of traffic on them varies enormously depending on where you are, what day of the week, and what time of day.

Urban commuter routes like the Interurban Trail in Seattle are most heavily traveled during commute times in the morning and late afternoon.

Some trails like the Sammamish River Trail between Redmond and Bothell are in pretty heavily built-up areas with lots of trailheads, so on a weekend there are lots of people doing all sorts of stuff. But on weekdays outside of commuter hours not so much.

People who aren't riding bikes have pretty limited range, and usually the number of people you'll see with all kinds of transportation drops off rapidly with distance from the trailhead. My old rule of thumb was that 90 percent of walkers don't go more than three miles from a trailhead, and 99 percent of walkers don't go more than six miles. And also at most trailheads there is a specific attraction nearby and most people are just going to that attraction.

Beyond that, I find most rail trails to be sparsely populated over most of their distance. And the good ones have superb sight lines and few road crossings so you can put the hammer down. Yeah, you'll have to slow down when you get back in the crowds, but there is always the next section.

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Olympic Discovery Trail W of Lake Crescent, WA. In twenty-odd miles I saw three cyclists and a handful of cars on roads connecting sections of the trail. You do the math.
 
and yet, we have other posters from your part of the world who claim that Lycra clad roadies are routinely running down or nearly running down or at least maiming people with their snobbery. observer bias or dishonesty, who knows.
Hysteria, paranoia and a persecution complex is the likely culprit, (I think that I know who you refer to). I raced in the early days of mountain bikes, I have been a roadie for most of my life and now at 68 I ride my road bike and my ebike. I have seen a few a$$holes through the years, but for the most part, cyclists in this area are welcoming and inclusive. people in motor vehicles are another story.
 
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Biggest safety issue here is rental scooters that do 25kmhr on footpath, then dump scooter in middle of footpath.
I can see why Paris banned them. They are a great transport tool, problem is humans that use them. Need to give scooter some smarts so adapts its speed to rider at time, eg 10kmhr for idiots and 25kmhr for people that ride responsibly. The idiots will soon change their riding style.

When comes to shared areas really need marked 2way cycleways. Won't stop zombie pedestrians wondering onto them but few cyclists zipping pass at speed will drive message home.
 
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Biggest safety issue here is rental scooters that do 25kmhr on footpath, then dump scooter in middle of footpath.
I can see why Paris banned them. They are a great transport tool, problem is humans that use them. Need to give scooter some smarts so adapts its speed to rider at time, eg 10kmhr for idiots and 25kmhr for people that ride responsibly. The idiots will soon change their riding style.

When comes to shared areas really need marked 2way cycleways. Won't stop zombie pedestrians wondering onto them but few cyclists zipping pass at speed will drive message home.
They remove a lot of cars from the road and drive demand for more non-car infrastructure. That’s what I (try) think at least when having to pop off my bike and move them off of the path.

These companies need to better leverage the tech to ensure proper parking. Here in Austin they’ve resorted to taking out billboard ads to plead with their customers to park them the right way. Seems like a big fail, or more likely they just don’t care about spending real money to solve the problem.
 
They remove a lot of cars from the road and drive demand for more non-car infrastructure. That’s what I (try) think at least when having to pop off my bike and move them off of the path.

These companies need to better leverage the tech to ensure proper parking. Here in Austin they’ve resorted to taking out billboard ads to plead with their customers to park them the right way. Seems like a big fail, or more likely they just don’t care about spending real money to solve the problem.
When rental is finished need to take photo to show it is parked responsibly. The scooter companies never look at photos based on what I've observed. Simple solution is docking stations or fixed parking areas. Means users will need to walk further.
 
Interesting article in LA Times today regarding E-bikes on the strand in South Bay-Redondo, Hermosa, Manhattan. The article concludes with an opinion by a politician that the ebike technology has outpaced the legislation ability in CA. Probably just a short period of time before ebikes will be required to register and treated just like a motorcycle...
 

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Horrific Crash on Manhattan Bridge Bike Path Underscores Moped Crisis
According to the NYPD's crash statistics, there were 44,754 reported crashes between January 1 and June 23.
Of those, 43,188 — or 96 percent — were caused by drivers of cars, SUVs, trucks, ambulances, vans and other heavy motorized vehicles.
Just 826 crashes — or 1.8 percent — were caused by the operators of e-bikes, e-scooters, mopeds or motorbikes, according to the police.
Another 740 crashes — or 1.6 percent — were caused by regular bike riders, the cops said.

Drilling down further, there have been 3,952 crashes that caused injuries to at least one pedestrian.
Of those crashes, 3,784 — or 96 percent again — were caused by car and truck drivers.
Only 168 — or 4.2 percent — were caused by the operators of e-bikes, e-scooters, mopeds or motorbikes, according to the police.


Why New York City wants electric bikes stopped at the border

I'm no fan of illegal mopeds cosplaying as e-bikes, but this uproar about ebikes is another example of extreme misdirection.

Pedestrian deaths are up 70% since 2010 and the reason is trucks and SUVs. They are larger, heavier, and faster than ever, with huge blunt front ends. It's basically like being hit by a brick wall.
 
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