Changing the location of the secondary/optional battery

I am planning to move the secondary/optional battery from the down tube to the rear rack on my Rize City MD. Has anyone tried this? Where there any issues that occurred?

Thanks in advance.
Ron Rodgers
 
As long as you have the right battery connectors and a secure mount, I don't see why it couldn't be done. In my case, I did just the opposite. I moved my spare rear rack battery to the downtube to free up carrying space on the rear rack. I did notice an improvement in bike balance by shifting the weight forward. It's something to be aware of when moving weight to the rear.

You might get some info from this thread on the subject:


If you post a few pics, you might get more specific advice.

Good luck with your project!
 
Thank you for your reply.
My big issue with the battery is, its location on the down tube. The battery make it difficult to mount the bike. Attached is a picture of how I extended the rear rack. With the bolts I am able to secure a lockable shipping/storage tote. When I go on long, 30-50 miles, I like to take tools, parts water, snack, locks, and a first aid kit. I am planning to the battery in the tote. That may change, but that is my current plant.

I currently ride on paved or dirt/gravel roads and paths. I don't mountain bike like I did a couple years ago.
 

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I do the same type of riding, and yes, the downtube battery definitely makes mounting the bike a bit difficult. In my case, the better weight distribution makes it worthwhile

Here are a few thoughts:

Make sure you secure the battery inside the tote so it won't slide around. You might also consider some form of protection to avoid damage from other items bouncing around inside the tote. Bike batteries are somewhat fragile, and can be dangerous when damaged.

Also consider the wiring. It needs to be 10 or 12 gauge stranded wire to handle current surges. Make sure it is properly fused, routed and firmly fastened where it won't get pinched, chaffed or caught on something. A short can be disastrous.

You may find the bike will be too light in front with all that weight so high, and that far to the rear. Make sure the braking, steering and balance aren't adversely affected.

Have you considered panniers? It looks like your rack has the necessary support rails. They carry the weight much lower, and greatly improve the center of gravity. I use them on very long rides to carry extra gear and even a third battery. When doing so, I put the battery in a padded, protective case in the event of an accident.

Unfortunately, aside from test riding one, I have no experience with Rize bikes. Hopefully, someone with more knowledge of that brand will offer better advice.
 
Thanks for the input. It is greatly appreciated as well.
I am going to be fasting the battery and its mount to the tote, so it won't be bouncing around on the inside of the tote. I am still concerned about the typical bumps and jars that are on the road or path. I also have a concern about heat. If I was just carrying a heat would not be an issue. But I am concerned with a battery in use and being covered, and over heating starting a fire.
I have rewired the battery to motor on my first e-bike. This included changing the mount, type of battery and the wires to the motor. Thank goodness for the forum! This forum really assisted me in my past endeavor.
I do have a center of gravity issue. but the tote can be locked when I stop to "hydrate" (have a beer) and have something to eat. Taking panniers off on the bike can be a pain at times. I looked into getting motor cycle panniers, but they were cost prohibitive. When transporting the bike the tote is in the car.
 
I do the same type of riding, and yes, the downtube battery definitely makes mounting the bike a bit difficult. In my case, the better weight distribution makes it worthwhile

Here are a few thoughts:

Make sure you secure the battery inside the tote so it won't slide around. You might also consider some form of protection to avoid damage from other items bouncing around inside the tote. Bike batteries are somewhat fragile, and can be dangerous when damaged.

Also consider the wiring. It needs to be 10 or 12 gauge stranded wire to handle current surges. Make sure it is properly fused, routed and firmly fastened where it won't get pinched, chaffed or caught on something. A short can be disastrous.

You may find the bike will be too light in front with all that weight so high, and that far to the rear. Make sure the braking, steering and balance aren't adversely affected.

Have you considered panniers? It looks like your rack has the necessary support rails. They carry the weight much lower, and greatly improve the center of gravity. I use them on very long rides to carry extra gear and even a third battery. When doing so, I put the battery in a padded, protective case in the event of an accident.

Unfortunately, aside from test riding one, I have no experience with Rize bikes. Hopefully, someone with more knowledge of that brand will offer better advice.
FYI- I was in Harbor Freight yesterday and I saw ammo boxes. I am now wondering if I could use the boxes as panniers. I will be exploring how to attach them to my bike. I could use a front rack to carry the stuff I want to access easily.
 
Ammo cans do make good weatherproof containers but they can be a bit heavy for a bike. You also need to be aware of the wider profile when riding trails. they can easily get hung up on branches or traffic control stanchions.

I use these insulated cable clamps to fasten objects to my bike frames:

P1070096a.jpg
P1070100a.jpg



They're strong, come in a variety of sizes, won't rust, and also won't mar the bike paint.

I use a Waterproof Nanuk case to carry gear on long rides. Expensive though:


IMG_003247b.jpg


I use the MIK interchangeable rack system so I can swap bags depending on the type of riding I'm doing:

IMG_003246b.jpg


Lots of possibilities.
 
Thank you for your input. It is appreciated. I forgot about riding trails.
I was looking at the plastic ammo boxes. They are light weight and easy to drill. I like your clips, because I may be able to to use them to attach the boxes to the frame. Ammo boxes are about 7" wide, so I am looking at increasing the width by about 14". Thanks again for your ideas.
 
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