I still wonder why EBR doesn't support dealers that sell bikes with fully functional THROTTLES. And why members put down those the can no longer pedal because they served there country in there youth.
 
I still wonder why EBR doesn't support dealers that sell bikes with fully functional THROTTLES. And why members put down those the can no longer pedal because they served there country in there youth.
As someone disabled and using an e-assist with throttle on my trike, I’ve never noticed any anti-throttle bias in this forum, although people are people and it’s inevitable that some people will voice judgmental/hurtful opinions. If so, they are definitely in the wrong forum! Re dealers and ebr, I have no opinion either way—every bike shop I know of would love to sell ebikes with throttles if the demand is there but Trek, Catrike, et al only provide Class 1 bikes for legal/liability reasons (I believe).
 
If you are looking for a Class 2 throttle only kit with no pedal assist and you're in the US or Canada I recommend contacting Grin Tech in Vancouver because they can provide a custom set up for your power needs and are happy to supply a throttle only kit. Assistive bikes and trikes that are operated by a rider who can pedal tend to follow local regulations so for example Dutch brand Van Raam and German brand Hase use either hub motors or mid-drives with pedal assist but even in the EU there are exceptions that enable throttle to be fitted, so for example Van Raam offers a 'launch control' feature which is essentially a low speed throttle to get going from stationary, they also offer full power throttles, as well as controls customized to your disability including shoulder controls. It's worth noting pedal assist can also be used on hand cycles to multiply human effort. Here in the US Electric Bike Technologies supply Class 2 hub kits with both throttle and PAS to several brands with disabled models including Worksman and Sun Bicycles, including a reversing feature to help manouver large heavy trikes.

I have noticed over the past few years pedal assist has been added to some Class 2 ebikes and kits where that was previously not the case: eg the Pedego Comfort Cruiser model was from the start and for several years a throttle only Class 2 but in the past year Pedego decided to reposition it in their lineup and added their PedalSense PAS; another example is Hilltopper which for several years offered Class 2 throttle only kits, their more recent kits have included PAS although their Hilltopper Sprinter model is still throttle only. It goes both ways too, Grin Tech produced a video to help Bionx owners convert their Class 1 torque sensor hub motors to a Class 2 throttle only set up.

EBR forum members hold a spectrum of opinion about pedal assist that reflects the wider ebike market, different regulatory environments, and diversity of e-bike riders and their needs - so for example eMTB riders tend to love Class 1 torque sensor pedal assist because they need precise control over power delivery when riding on technical terrain, whereas cargo bike riders love Class 2 throttle which helps you get going from stationary when loaded up, and sometimes in their enthusiasm a post may ignore how other riders needs are different. EBR is moderated and you can report a post so bad behavior can be policed, also I encourage you to use the Ignore button if you don't like to read a forum members opinions.
 
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I’ve never noticed any anti-throttle bias
It’s easy to miss the chaff. But they’re out there and I see them pop up wherever a throttle is discussed. A view that narrow gets ignored. Typically it’s the guy who’s fully able and is a one bike wonder.
 
It’s easy to miss the chaff. But they’re out there and I see them pop up wherever a throttle is discussed. A view that narrow gets ignored. Typically it’s the guy who’s fully able and is a one bike wonder.
The throttle is contested only in case a fully able person needs a throttle to just move from a cold start.
EBR Forum members know at least one respected member who suffers numerous serious ailments, owns many e-bikes, and none of his e-bikes has a throttle.

Signed: a four e-bike wonder.
 
All three of my e-bikes were connected to TREK. But TREK dealers refuse to sell or fix under warranty or other wise.
 
I think that the market for persons with various disabilities is largely overlooked. For many bike companies their brand image is like that of a bathing suit company that only makes suits for skinny models. Someone will get out front with this substantial market segment. The US population is getting older. A few years ago I made my first electric Trike. It had a throttle and a torque sensor. It was for an elderly professor to ride on a university campus. Since then I have made bikes for people with hand issues who cannot comfortably operate brake levers and for people with knee or hip disabilities. I do not like throttle bikes for my own riding style. I am opinionated. But my personal tastes are not what is best for everyone. That is why we need to be accommodating. Would a bartender be any good if he only made his favorite drink, criticizing everyone else's preferences? Nope. He would be fired. Also, needs and preferences can change.
 
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The throttle is contested only in case a fully able person needs a throttle to just move from a cold start.
EBR Forum members know at least one respected member who suffers numerous serious ailments, owns many e-bikes, and none of his e-bikes has a throttle.

Signed: a four e-bike wonder.
Your view is narrow and not appreciated.
 
1 in 4 people in the US have a disability. They tend to be more concentrated in places that are not as bike friendly. I know that I feel better from riding bikes. Although I do not have proof, I have seen that once on a bike, people transform in healthy ways no matter at what health state they begin. Assistance from an electric bike can help initiate and sustain this transformation. It works better than drugs.
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I am working on a Trek right now for a disabled person. She does not have fully articulating fingers. It will have a Nexus 8 with a coaster brake to a mid-drive without a throttle. The shifter will be flipped so the levers are up. This way speed is controlled with her using pedal pressure and her hands can focus on steering. It is so rewarding to know that I am helping to make someone's life a little bit better.
 
I am working on a Trek right now for a disabled person. She does not have fully articulating fingers. It will have a Nexus 8 with a coaster brake to a mid-drive without a throttle. The shifter will be flipped so the levers are up. This way speed is controlled with her using pedal pressure and her hands can focus on steering. It is so rewarding to know that I am helping to make someone's life a little bit better.
I've seen TSDZ2s listed that accommodate coaster brakes - is that what you're using? Or are there others?
 
I've seen TSDZ2s listed that accommodate coaster brakes - is that what you're using? Or are there others?
It must be a motor designed specifically for a coaster brake. The internal clutch system is different. These motors have a label on the bottom that says BK for brake. There are also start up issues. The torque sensor must be in a neutral position, without forward or back pressure to set a zero tare. Or it will not work and will give an error code. Yes, this one is a TS. I do not know of others. My go to bike is a coaster brake bike. It also helps make the build clean with two wires to the HB, shift and display. Here is one example.
 

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I am working on a Trek right now for a disabled person. She does not have fully articulating fingers. It will have a Nexus 8 with a coaster brake to a mid-drive without a throttle. The shifter will be flipped so the levers are up. This way speed is controlled with her using pedal pressure and her hands can focus on steering. It is so rewarding to know that I am helping to make someone's life a little bit better.
I just set a calendar date for my 75th birthday to order a special build bike from you.👍
Hopefully I won't need it before then.
 
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