Replacing The Coin Battery In the Specialized SL TCU Gen 1

OK - got it out. I got some plastic tweezers from Amazon but they can't reach in far enough to get a grip. I used a jewelers screw drive (yes - practially the size of a big needle) and stuck it down the side of the battery and gently 'rolled' it out. The little metal pin in front of the battery pushed down for me and stayed there. I was afraid I broke it but popped back up and all working. On another slightly related topic - I crashed my bike today coming off some wet wood planks causing the handlebars to turn full 180 degrees and pulled the wire out of my Lezyne light. I tried to open the lamp to pull wire back through but case must be glued and I couldn't break the adhesive without really damaging the light. Will order new and splice in. Wish stuff could be opened and fixed.
 

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HI Everyone I took the pry off the rear cover approach. Tried the tweezer approach, didn't work, tweezers were too flimsy. With an exacto pry up each clip on the back cover to release the lid, then lift up and go to the next of the 3 clips, kind of a 3-handed job. Then pop the cover, which is held down with adhesive. This exposes the back of the battery which I use the pointy edge of dig into the batter enough to push it out while holding down the metal retainer tab in the front. The adhesive did hold but the clips look distressed.

If I did this again I would take a straight pin approach and bend the tip enough to act as a claw to pull that edge of the casing on the battery, there is a lip that could be grabbed.

But in the end, the bike fired up and it's on the road again.

Cheers
 

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HI Everyone I took the pry off the rear cover approach. Tried the tweezer approach, didn't work, tweezers were too flimsy. With an exacto pry up each clip on the back cover to release the lid, then lift up and go to the next of the 3 clips, kind of a 3-handed job. Then pop the cover, which is held down with adhesive. This exposes the back of the battery which I use the pointy edge of dig into the batter enough to push it out while holding down the metal retainer tab in the front. The adhesive did hold but the clips look distressed.

If I did this again I would take a straight pin approach and bend the tip enough to act as a claw to pull that edge of the casing on the battery, there is a lip that could be grabbed.

But in the end, the bike fired up and it's on the road again.

Cheers
If only US military secrets were as secure! :eek:
 
As a Spesh-curious, I'd like to know does this render the bike inoperable until the batterty is replaced? doesn't seem like something you'd want to attempt as a field repair..
 
As a Spesh-curious, I'd like to know does this render the bike inoperable until the batterty is replaced? doesn't seem like something you'd want to attempt as a field repair..
What led me to replace the battery was the bike was stored in the garage for the winter, and it wouldn't turn on. I charged it, and the light came on and seemed brighter but wouldn't stay on. This lead me to find out that the battery needed to be changed in the TCU. So yes, your bike won't work. You could do a field change with the right tools and a good dose of luck. What concerned me when I unplugged the connectors was how frail the wires are., Be very careful when plugging it back in. Kind of like installing a CPU in a motherboard all those little pins, and yes I've bent them.
Good Luck
 
As the TCU is the Control Unit, an SL e-bike will not work without the operable battery inside the unit. However, the user will be warned well in advance by low battery messages (blinking LEDs on Gen 1 or by text message on Gen 2) so the chance to be caught in the field unprepared is next to none.
 
The operation of removing the spent coin battery might seem complicated to a person who has never been replacing a battery in a watch in previous decades :D
I recommend to never disconnect the TCU or dismantle it. A needle would do to remove the battery. One only needs to try.
I'm saying the above as a person having "two left hands", that is, very poor with tools and manual work :)
 
I just swapped the batteries out of both my wife’s and my Creo TCU. Thanks for the helpful advice @kahn and @Stefan Mikes . In my case, I followed @BioWheel 's method using a jeweler's flat head screwdriver to simultaneously depress the spring and slowly coax the battery out. It went much quicker with the second bike. Toothpicks won’t work as they are too fragile and will break off. Both of the original batteries registered LOW <2.1V on my tester.
 
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