Is it safe to freely use the throttle WHILE PEDALING on a mid drive?

Why the Throttle is Important to My Enjoyment of Cycling
The Atlas is more complicated. If you leave it on PAS 0 (zero) the throttle won't work, doesn't engage; you have to leave on PAS 1. The moment I start pedaling, as mentioned before, the Atlas takes off very quickly so I immediately activate the throttle which will cut off the pedal assist (you feel it instantly) and conformably dial back pedal assist to only 40, 50, 60 watts as opposed to the 140+ watts. My Atlas is new and with over 110 miles I haven't recharged it's huge battery a single time yet, still have 44%. Mostly riding without assist, of course.
Have you reached out to Evelo to ask them about changing the default PAS level percentages? Evelo claims to have special programming to raise the max power from 600 to 1200 watts. Maybe they can give you a VESC program to reset the levels to be lower.
 
Some software versions of the bbshd causes the pedal sensor to overide the throttle.
My bbshd did that and if you had it on say assist three and pedaled while using full throttle it would cut the power back, only assist nine would keep full power.
Its actually quite bad with a very jerky drop and recover of power.

If I had bothered to buy a lead I would have removed pedal assist entirely, a throttle is by far the best torque and cadence sensor you can have.
 
Have you reached out to Evelo to ask them about changing the default PAS level percentages? Evelo claims to have special programming to raise the max power from 600 to 1200 watts. Maybe they can give you a VESC program to reset the levels to be lower.
I'm kind of breaking in the Atlas. Experimenting with saddles since I ride for about 2 hours each early morning and need to be comfortable. Also changing the grips, seat, handlebar angles. I'm getting to the PAS levels now. Evelo has always responded quickly and offered excellent support, anytime of the day, weekends included. I'll try the 9 PAS levels see if there's a positive change then if not, reach out to support.

I'm also still searching for an integrated headlight that can be accommodated in 6 volts and a maximum of 0.5 amps, for a total power of 3 Watts in the existing support and Julet connector in replacement of the UGOE 400 lumens. I need east 1000 to 1200 lumens. For now, I use the UGOE and my rechargeable NiteRider, 1200 lm. Most headlights demand a lot mor than the 3W available and I don't want to damage the Bafang controller.
 
Currently, I'm testing if selecting the 9 PAS modes in the advanced settings of the Atlas would offer a more refined option of PAS to experiment if PAS 1 is more dialed down in the 9 modes than the current 5 levels of PAS.
My torque-sensing rear hub-drive offers 0-3, 0-5, 1-5, 0-6, and 0-9 assist levels. The progressive throttle is disabled only at PAS 0. At all other levels, it simply adds to the assist. Really like this power delivery approach.

Vastly prefer the 0-9 option for the finer control. Subjectively, my PAS 1/9 feels lower-power with 0-9 levels than with any other option, and the display's motor power bar seems to bear this out. But the difference is small at best.

The Atlas is more complicated. If you leave it on PAS 0 (zero) the throttle won't work, doesn't engage; you have to leave on PAS 1. The moment I start pedaling, as mentioned before, the Atlas takes off very quickly so I immediately activate the throttle which will cut off the pedal assist (you feel it instantly) and conformably dial back pedal assist to only 40, 50, 60 watts as opposed to the 140+ watts.
Interesting that your PAS 1 is so overpowering on the Atlas. I see on the official specs that it has both torque and cadence sensors, just like my ebike. But my PAS 1 isn't like that at all. The bike defaults to PAS 1 when turned on, and that's where mine stays at least 95% of the time — even on hills.

Like you, I view the throttle, not as a way to get out of meaningful pedaling, but as a valuable riding tool and safety feature — especially for quick bursts of speed. I always pedal and typically use the the throttle only a second at a time a few times per ride.

Many knee-jerk throttle-haters seem unable to grasp this kind of throttle use and the many unexpected benefits it provides. It's one thing not to want that for yourself, quite another to look down on others who find it useful.
 
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Some software versions of the bbshd causes the pedal sensor to overide the throttle.
My bbshd did that and if you had it on say assist three and pedaled while using full throttle it would cut the power back, only assist nine would keep full power.
Its actually quite bad with a very jerky drop and recover of power.

If I had bothered to buy a lead... I would have removed pedal assist entirely, a throttle is by far the best torque and cadence sensor you can have.
....then you might have a clue.
 
It does take a lot of technical riding to really get the knack for it, certainly a thumb throttle is far more exact.
When I swapped from right to left I had to learn all over again
 
My torque-sensing rear hub-drive offers 0-3, 0-5, 1-5, 0-6, and 0-9 assist levels. The progressive throttle is disabled only at PAS 0. At all other levels, it simply adds to the assist. Really like this power delivery approach.

Vastly prefer the 0-9 option for the finer control. Subjectively, my PAS 1/9 feels lower-power with 0-9 levels than with any other option, and the display's motor power bar seems to bear this out. But the difference is small at best.


Interesting that your PAS 1 is so overpowering on the Atlas. I see on the official specs that it has both torque and cadence sensors, just like my ebike. But my PAS 1 isn't like that at all. The bike defaults to PAS 1 when turned on, and that's where mine stays at least 95% of the time — even on hills.

Like you, I view the throttle, not as a way to get out of meaningful pedaling, but as a valuable riding tool and safety feature — especially for quick bursts of speed. I always pedal and typically use the the throttle only a second at a time a few times per ride.

Many knee-jerk throttle-haters seem unable to grasp this kind of throttle use and the many unexpected benefits it provides. It's one thing not to want that for yourself, quite another to look down on others who find it useful.
After changing to PAS to 9 levels, the ride smoothed out quite a bit. I noticed that when engaging PAS to level 1 now starts off more subtly, around 80-100W of power as opposed to before 150-175W. The jerking when engaging PAS has now been almost eliminated.
 
When it comes to using the throttle while pedaling, the method can vary depending on the specific electric bike and its motor system. Certain electric bikes, especially those equipped with mid-drive motors, are designed to allow simultaneous pedaling and throttle usage. However, it's advisable to refer to the manufacturer's guidelines or consult the bike's user manual for precise recommendations tailored to your electric bike model. By doing so, you can ensure both safe and optimal utilization of the throttle and pedal-assist features. So keep enjoying your rides worry-free.
 
I see the e-bike throttle as just a tool, to be used or abused.
I have the 9 PAS levels on my BBS02 setup in small steps, from very mild to full beans.
Full power always avail from the throttle.
If I'm moseying along on a flat trail in PAS 1 or 2 and encounter a slower biker pedestrian I can scoot for a prompt pass.
In city traffic sometimes I want to sprint through an intersection or evade an aggressive car driver.
It's much quicker and simpler to nudge the throttle than changing PAS level.
I'd guess I use the throttle average 5 seconds in 10 miles of riding.
 
If someone told you how to use your pedal assist or what gear to be in, you'd say, "Butt out, not your call." If a smug roadie in lycra came up and said your motor's unnecessary, you'd say the same thing.

Throttle use is no different.
Haven't had a roadie accost me this way, but I'd answer, "How are you going to ride when you're almost 86 years old?"
 
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