Coffee Technology on The Tour

The butter thing is called "Bulletproof coffee", it allows you to take a massive caffeine dose that gets ingested slowly so you don't get a huge caffeine hit, the fats in the butter bind with the caffeine and absorb slower.

Another thing...... the only way to make coffee is with a moka pot, anything less is an insult, especially the 'filter' stuff Americans make, eww. Probably the most versatile way too, from stove top to a camp fire, no faff, just perfect coffee.

Sorry, i'm one of those people, i've brewed coffee in every possible manner, even to the extent of buying green beans and roasting them myself.

So my recommendations :-

Bialetti Moka pot

View attachment 86776And a special coffee to go in it would be "Mexican Finca Muxbal" a single origin bean only grown in one place has a beautiful caramelly butteryness to it, i use a full 6 cup pot to 1 large latte
Quick search showed Mexican Finca Muxba was available in Europe but not Canada. I once was given a bag of african coffee (can't remember the name) and it was so good you could reuse the grounds and even that made better coffee than any name brand. I'd settle for summa dat Finca but I don't see it available. Those little coffee makers do a great job. I may get another one, it's been decades since I had one of those.
 
Among other fascinating observations he credits coffee for the industrial revolution.
I wonder if it was not the tea that really made it. I was fascinated to learn in my youth that tea contained more caffeine than coffee, only in less soluble form (theine).

They say (weak) beer was the daily beverage before tea replaced it.
 
Coffee was first in Europe I believe. The water then was so dangerous people drank alcohol morning, noon and night. Coffee changed this, and factories with a reasonably sober work force were made possible. Owners took notice of better production and instituted the ‘coffee break’
 
Coffee was first in Europe I believe. The water then was so dangerous people drank alcohol morning, noon and night. Coffee changed this, and factories with a reasonably sober work force were made possible. Owners took notice of better production and instituted the ‘coffee break’
Aye, coffee was first but it didn't change the drinking habits of the general population. It is believed all started with the Battle of Vienna (1683) where the Turkish were defeated, and some ingenious man used coffee captured from the Turks to open the first cafe in Vienna. Still, the general population used to drink beer.

It was the British to bring tea from India to Europe, and steamships and the 19th century made tea the most popular world's beverage.
 
If I had my book ( I loaned it) I’d know for sure but coffee was definitely in England 30-50 years before Battle of Vienna. And the Dutch East Asian company was trading it after smuggling beans to the east. Pollan’s book is very interesting on the subject, as well as mescaline and Opium
 
I LOVE my Bialetti moka pots! If I were the touring type, I'd definitely find space for my 3-cupper! And, I'd only put my fine Caffe Kimbo Espresso Napolitano (Imported from Italy via evil Amazon) in the basket... Living in Naples for 3 years ruined me for anything but Caffe Italiano 😁😁😁.
 

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How does the moka pot work? Something like the stovetop expresso pots I remember from a few decades ago?
 
@PatriciaK: I can see you're fascinated with Italy! :) Have you ever been to Tuscany? A magical place. I would love exploring it on a good e-MTB!

View attachment 104215
Medieval skyscrapers of San Gimignano, Tuscany, Italy. 2005.
We lived in Naples for 3 years (2005-08), and before COVID, spent several weeks there - at least 2 for Italian school (in Lucca, Tuscany) and another couple for traveling - every year. I am missing it terribly! An Ebike tour would be benissimo!

Fun fact: it's also a mortal sin in Italy to break your spaghetti in half before you cook it 🤪...
 
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Lucca, Tuscany
Oh!

Fun fact: it's also a mortal sin in Italy to break your spaghetti in half before you cook it 🤪...
It is also a sin to eat spaghetti with more than a single fork :) As a boy, I had a loosely related family in Italy. On my single Italian vacation under the old Polish regime (1974), the first thing the Italian family taught me was how to eat spaghetti properly! And a young boy there showed to me you actually could chew parmigiano!
 
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Oh!


It is also a sin to eat spaghetti with more than a single fork :) As a boy, I had a loosely related family in Italy. On my single Italian vacation under the old Polish regime (1974), the first thing the Italian family taught me was how to eat spaghetti properly! And a young boy there showed to me you actually could chew parmigiano!
Yes, in our cultural relations class when we first arrived in Naples, we were quickly disabused by our native Neapolitan instructor from the using a spoon and twirling the fork on that technique - at least in Naples, that's just NOT done! Actually, in all our travels, I've never seen an Italian use a spoon to help twirl their spaghetti, though many, while sitting for a meal, use fork and knife to eat pizza 😉.
 
How does the moka pot work? Something like the stovetop expresso pots I remember from a few decades ago?
I just bought a moka pot for in my van. I have made three pots so far ... two that I just threw out after the first taste, and one that was drinkable...barely. Obviously there's a learning curve.
 
I stick to Nespresso as I am not a connoiseur but drink many coffee mugs a day. Carrefour carries Nespresso compatible capsules, which are inexpensive yet good enough.

Now, during the season, large supermarkets seem to be ravaged. The supply chain disruption hit these large stores. I have been barely able to stock myself for the coming few days!
 
I have used a nespresso at home since 2011. Interestingly, I discovered them while traveling in Spain in around 2009. They make better coffee while using less actual coffee than any other system I've used.

What I also find fascinating is that because the coffee in the little cartridges is vacuum-packed, you are basically making that good coffee with stale grounds. It shows me that the temperature and pressure of the water is far more important for good coffee than good coffee is.

Yes, supply chains are completely trashed here as well.
 
I stick to Nespresso as I am not a connoiseur but drink many coffee mugs a day. Carrefour carries Nespresso compatible capsules, which are inexpensive yet good enough.

Now, during the season, large supermarkets seem to be ravaged. The supply chain disruption hit these large stores. I have been barely able to stock myself for the coming few days!
I just drove across the country from Pennsylvania to Arizona, and the shops along the highways seem well stocked with coffee and tea, but out of stock on many other types of things ... full shelves next to empty shelves, pies and cakes displays half full b/c of some unavailable ingredients, lots of cookies but no bread or rolls, etc. Stay flexible.
 
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