Today was supposed to be new Creo announcement day!

I have ordered a Creo 2, but with the intention of swapping it back to road. I will remove the dropper (in favour of split carbon Ergon for more comfort), swap the wheels and swap drive train to my well loved GRX Di2. I have all these bit already. I will swap the chainring to Garbaruk (yes they make a 107BCD in Narrow Wide). I will also tidy up the front end. The Specialized press shots have edited out the remote wire and with the showing, 5 wires on the front is not a good look. I can hide the di2 and remote cable (i use the Di2 hack) and have just 2 brake hoses. I need and extra button for the confirm button on the Mastermind TCU, but this is easily sorted. I rode the Levo 2 yesterday with the new motor and confirm it is quieter (no more high pitched whine) and has more power. As for range,,,,3 lap of car park didn't tell me much !!
I can't wait to see your new bike after all these mods! Please do share.

Are you positive that the GRX Di2 drivetrain (assuming a full swap to shimano?) will fit on the Creo 2?
 
See the post #63. The geometry has completely changed. It is not "slightly wider clearances"; these are dramatically wider up to 2.2".
Do a bit of analysis on the geometries and you'll notice most of the changes relate to the increased tire size shipped with the bike, as well as the greater maximum tire sizes, rather than those impacting rider positioning. Diameter difference of 700x47 vs 700x38 is 28mm and diameter difference of 700x42 vs 29x2.2 is 23.6mm using published tire circumference data. So it's not surprising to see a 15mm longer fork length or 9mm longer chainstay to accomodate a 12mm greater radius tire, or 34mm longer wheelbase. It'd be interesting to see those figures with same-size tires on each.

See table below based on geometries for the Creo Expert EVO and Creo 2 Expert.

Multiple bosses (a must!) Proper hubs (I was reading Creo 1 users bitching about the Road Boost); you might want to replace the wheels with even better ones. Or replace them if damaged with any brand or custom wheels.
Additional bosses are great for bike packing / adventure biking, but we're talking generalized gravel riding.

Only real difference in obtaining new/better wheels is there's less choice of off-the-shelf prebuilt wheels, but it's pretty easy to order wheels with the appropriate hub if desired. Just not as big a deal as some choose to think.


The new motor is irrelevant. It is the geometry, wide clearances, multiple bosses and proper hub spacing that make the Creo 2 a true gravel e-bike.

Yes, there's improvements in the Creo2 oriented for gravel and adventure riding, but honestly it's not the earth-shattering difference you've conveyed.

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I can't wait to see your new bike after all these mods! Please do share.

Are you positive that the GRX Di2 drivetrain (assuming a full swap to shimano?) will fit on the Creo 2?
I see no reason it will not fit. It looks like a standard derailleur hanger and I swapping to full GRX Di2 that is fitted to my current Creo. I have the Di2 hack for the Power setting and have worked out how I can get this to work with Mastermind TCU. This will really clean up the front end as I can hide the Di2 cable and remote wire with Rear brake hose so only 2 will be seen. In UK so bike not due until Nov
 
Speaking of where to purchase, I have a hypothesis to test out here: manufacturer offers 30 day, 3rd party dealer may better support you if something goes really wrong? (Claim from a local Spec dealer).
Probably the best option is the Specialized Delivery. You pick the bike online and select the nearby Spec LBS that is on the list and you trust them. They are expected to bring the bike to your home, and instruct you how to use it. The LBS will get the maximum commission they can get in the case of the online sale. (They will only earn more if they ordered the bike themselves and have sold it to you from the LBS floor). The Specialized warranty works everywhere but of course the LBS is the most positive if you bought the bike directly from them.
 
Probably the best option is the Specialized Delivery. You pick the bike online and select the nearby Spec LBS that is on the list and you trust them. They are expected to bring the bike to your home, and instruct you how to use it. The LBS will get the maximum commission they can get in the case of the online sale. (They will only earn more if they ordered the bike themselves and have sold it to you from the LBS floor). The Specialized warranty works everywhere but of course the LBS is the most positive if you bought the bike directly from them.
Here in the US, or at least in my little corner of the US, choosing Specialized Delivery adds a $75 delivery fee, pickup in store adds a $50 fee, and both options also incur a $15 Environmental Recycling Fee. If one goes to the LBS and they place the order, those fees don't apply. I would happily visit the LBS a second time to save $90.

I also learned (when I bought my Creo E5 earlier this year) that the stores order from a different stock than the website. Helpful if a preferred model isn't showing available on the website, as it may be available for an LBS to order.

Another factor is the LBS might offer a discount on bike fitting if purchased with the bike - I did so and saved $100. Well worth it.

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I also learned (when I bought my Creo E5 earlier this year) that the stores order from a different stock than the website. Helpful if a preferred model isn't showing available on the website, as it may be available for an LBS to order.
Yes, the dealers have the pool allocated to them. Big, Specialized owned stores get the lion's share of that pool. Small stores get very little.
 
Did you buy directly from specialized or from the LBS?

My LBS suggests (and they are confirming) that they can't get the bike right now.
online at the specialized website. Delivery to LBS. LBS only had 1 in stock, and no more in their order queue. They recommended buying the one in the store since it was my size, or order online quickly since the inventory is low.
 
trust me stefan, i am well versed in the gravel bike movement! it started in the western united states, after all, and the vast majority of the open land west of the rockies is federal or otherwise protected land crisscrossed with hundreds of thousands of kilometers of fire roads, trails, and the like! most of my long rides are in marin county, and i’m a stones throw santa cruz counties, which may be familiar as the names that inspired their bike makers LOL.

my objection is not that some like gravel - more bikes, more riders, more better! i personally don’t enjoy it much, so it’s disappointing that specialized no longer makes an electric road bike. sure, they can remove the dropper and put on 28 or 30mm tires on the creo 2, but it’s still got the wrong geometry for a road bike.

around here, gravel is HILLY, with frequent long grades exceeding 15% for many kilometers, so the concept of a gravel e-bike is not wrong. it simply should have been called something else to make room for a true creo 2!

another interesting comparison for the creo 2 is the new moots express. a few pounds heavier, but much bigger battery, more power, di2 xtr drivetrains, etc. very similar price point to a creo 2 expert. moots, of course, is a colorado brand known for legendary titanium road and gravel bikes. they are getting a TON of bad press for making a carbon e-bike for gravel, but obviously they and specialized are reading the same marketing reports!
The Moots is interesting. Odd that it’s a Moots for sure! Looks like they’ve done the same re jigging of the EP8 motor that Orbea did with the Rise & Urrun, limiting it to 60nm for longer range.


I checked the Orbea website to see what their e gravel offering looks like. They don’t have one (yet) so I’m guessing they sell enough of their e road bikes in Europe plus their popular emtbs not to worry yet about this more niche market. If they do come out with one it’ll be interesting to see.
 
The Moots is interesting. Odd that it’s a Moots for sure! Looks like they’ve done the same re jigging of the EP8 motor that Orbea did with the Rise & Urrun, limiting it to 60nm for longer range.


I checked the Orbea website to see what their e gravel offering looks like. They don’t have one (yet) so I’m guessing they sell enough of their e road bikes in Europe plus their popular emtbs not to worry yet about this more niche market. If they do come out with one it’ll be interesting to see.
Orbea do have the gain range of e road bikes with the Mahle hub motor & say you can use these for gravel. But with max clearances of 35mm I’m not sure they are really that bothered about marking a gravel specific model the way Specialized or Moots or others have done.
 
Orbea do have the gain range of e road bikes with the Mahle hub motor & say you can use these for gravel. But with max clearances of 35mm I’m not sure they are really that bothered about marking a gravel specific model the way Specialized or Moots or others have done.
Newest models seems to be a step back in terms of tire clearance. I’ve previous one and it is 40mm clearance
 
I was to Specialized Warsaw yesterday. For some reason, people of the other LBS (Specialized Warsaw SOHO) were there too. Everybody seemed to be really excited! (I was excited, too!) It is not only the new Creo 2 but also the new Roubaix SL 8. The Specialized employees seemed to feel their brand made new, valuable and sellable achievements!

My favourite salesman had a big grin on his face when he was saying: 'And these 47 mm tyres on Creo 2 as the stock!" :) He also mentioned it is the first time Specialized decided to give the e-bike weight. The SOHO manager told me the FutureShock comes as 3.1, 3.2, and 3.3. Creo 2 Comp will take the FS 3.2.

The first specimens of Creo 2 should arrive in the Warsaw LBSes within a month.
 
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Curious if anyone could compare hydraulic to spring actuated dampening - is that just the method of setting the suspension?
Presumably the spring resists compression and the hydraulic dampening slows rebound to prevent bounciness. Much like how springs and shocks function in the automotive world, or bicycle suspension/ motorcycle forks usually work.
 
online at the specialized website. Delivery to LBS. LBS only had 1 in stock, and no more in their order queue. They recommended buying the one in the store since it was my size, or order online quickly since the inventory is low.
I picked up my Creo 2 comp today. I went on a short, relatively flat 10-mile ride today. It’s hot in California today, so it was a short ride. For a comparison of first impressions, I have been riding a Turbo Vado SL 4.0 for the past 3.5 years. My first impressions are that the 1.2 motor is much quieter (similar to my bike with a Brose motor). The riding experience feels completely natural, like a non e-bike. The ride is smooth over bumps, cranks, and holes, which I attribute to the carbon frame and Future Shock. The tires make quite a bit of road noise. This is my first bike with electronic shifting, and it’s really cool.
 

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I picked up my Creo 2 comp today. I went on a short, relatively flat 10-mile ride today. It’s hot in California today, so it was a short ride. For a comparison of first impressions, I have been riding a Turbo Vado SL 4.0 for the past 3.5 years. My first impressions are that the 1.2 motor is much quieter (similar to my bike with a Brose motor). The riding experience feels completely natural, like a non e-bike. The ride is smooth over bumps, cranks, and holes, which I attribute to the carbon frame and Future Shock. The tires make quite a bit of road noise. This is my first bike with electronic shifting, and it’s really cool.
That sounds fantastic! Do the wider tires make it difficult to ride unpowered?
 
I picked up my Creo 2 comp today. I went on a short, relatively flat 10-mile ride today. It’s hot in California today, so it was a short ride. For a comparison of first impressions, I have been riding a Turbo Vado SL 4.0 for the past 3.5 years. My first impressions are that the 1.2 motor is much quieter (similar to my bike with a Brose motor). The riding experience feels completely natural, like a non e-bike. The ride is smooth over bumps, cranks, and holes, which I attribute to the carbon frame and Future Shock. The tires make quite a bit of road noise. This is my first bike with electronic shifting, and it’s really cool.
that finish looks amazing! !!
 
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