Suggestions for ebike around $1500?

pveer

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USA
I'm looking for my first ebike. My daily rides are around 4-5 miles. The route is reasonably hilly. I'm 5'10" and 180 lbs. My priorities are ease of use, less complaints (peaceful maintenance), removable battery and good brakes. I prefer step thrus.
I've shortlisted the following and am open to new suggestions: Ride1up 500/700, Radcity 3, Radcity plus 5 and Trek Townie Go! 7D.
Also, how long do the batteries last and how much do replacements cost?
Thank you in advance for your support!
 
I’ve always ridden Townie style frames. I chose to use kits to convert my favorite frames. Unfortunatel, unlike some, my component choice adds nearly $1500 to the bike price. But I have a kit that’s repairable sustainable and runs on 36v, 48v, and 52v. I especially like those flat foot frames for the comfortable upright position. AND I feel safer in traffic being eye to eye level with the cages. I watch faces for clues from the clueless cager.

Do ride a fat bike before committing.

The Townie won’t have a throttle and not my cuppa, but RAD seems to becoming a more common maker direct brand with happy riders. I’m definitely NOT into the fat tire bikes. There are completely opposite opinions, but a fattie would be my last choice for a commute. Regardless of the short mileage you’ve posted.
 
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I'm looking for my first ebike. My daily rides are around 4-5 miles. The route is reasonably hilly. I'm 5'10" and 180 lbs. My priorities are ease of use, less complaints (peaceful maintenance), removable battery and good brakes. I prefer step thrus.
I've shortlisted the following and am open to new suggestions: Ride1up 500/700, Radcity 3, Radcity plus 5 and Trek Townie Go! 7D.
Also, how long do the batteries last and how much do replacements cost?
Thank you in advance for your support!
With hills in your life I'm pretty sure the early Rad City will prove gutless while the new version will likely be MUCH "sportier". There's a huge difference in the early direct drive hub equipped bikes vs. the newest geared hub version. Much available regarding that difference so I won't repeat it all here. I WILL say, the more you weigh and the bigger the hills, the more difference will be apparent between them. The new 'City also comes with hydraulic brakes. Yes the mechanicals will stop the bike just fine, but after driving both there is little imagination required to know which you'll prefer.

The Ride1up (R1U) is a worthy competitor when compared to the RAD City when considering the 700 model. The difference will be in the HUGE popularity of the RAD bikes, which WILL transfer directly to resale value and how easy the bike will be to sell should you decide to move on to nicer/more expensive bike, or the need to bail on the e-bike plan completely comes up. I'm pretty sure you'll notice the fact many people will be commenting on the support available for the RAD product as well.

I do ALL of my own work on my bikes, mostly because I want it done right, but also because I enjoy doing it. It's part of the hobby for me. Because of this, I am NOT a fan of bikes sold using proprietary parts that must be returned to a dealer for service. The TEK line up are perfect examples of such a bike. The RAD and the RIU are both examples of bikes built using non proprietary parts that can be sourced from most places selling bike parts. That's a big deal if doing your own work, and long term maintenance costs are an issue. -Al
 
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The Rad 3 and 4 are direct drive motors and i think the other bikes you listed are better choices. I would go with the Ride1 up i guess, i like the fact that it does not use a proprietary battery like the Rad so your not tied to the company if you need to replace it post warranty, Reention Rino can easilly be purchased online.
 
i like the fact that it does not use a proprietary battery like the Rad
It looks like a Hailong (Shark) pack? Available widely.
AND their battery price isn't bad at all.

The motor could have Satoraid for increased heat reduction.
Impressive bike at the price point IMO.
I'm moving back to DD and GD for my personal daily rides. Keeping two 36V ebikes with BBSxx mids for bike paths.
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I’ve always ridden Townie style frames. I chose to use kits to convert my favorite frames. Unfortunatel, unlike some, my component choice adds nearly $1500 to the bike price. But I have a kit that’s repairable sustainable and runs on 36v, 48v, and 52v. I especially like those flat foot frames for the comfortable upright position. AND I feel safer in traffic being eye to eye level with the cages. I watch faces for clues from the clueless cager.

Do ride a fat bike before committing.

The Townie won’t have a throttle and not my cuppa, but RAD seems to becoming a more common maker direct brand with happy riders. I’m definitely NOT into the fat tire bikes. There are completely opposite opinions, but a fattie would be my last choice for a commute. Regardless of the short mileage you’ve posted.

I really don't know why so many people out there don't like fat tire bikes. This is the first one that I have owned and I can say I really don't notice a difference unless I am riding on the gravel trails and I find it better on gravel. As a kid i grew up on bikes.

Back in the 60's where every bike we had was just a one speed. Then came the 3 speeds and 5 speeds then the 10 speeds. The old Apollo 10 speed is what I rode as a teen and up. Didn't matter which bike you had when you were a kid, you rode it though everything, ditches, trails, water, jumps you name it. Then in the early 2000 I bought a Raleigh mountain bike with a little bit bigger tire and I rode that everywhere. Now I upgraded to a E-Bike fat tire bike and really enjoy the ride.

I ride it on pavement and gravel. I prefer the gavel because if I am on gravel that means that I am away from car traffic. Where I live in the lower mainland outside of Vancouver they have a huge amount of trail systems for walking and riding bikes. As an example, I just made up a route on my map for a ride and it is about 60 km and only about 10% will be on a road. Starts at my house ends at my house with no doubling back. Some of the trails are paved and most are gravel, but I find the fat tire bike rides smoother over the gravel then the skinny tires. The skinny tires seen to spit out a lot of rocks side to to or slide off rocks side to side, where the fat tire just goes right over them smoothly.

Mind you my Fat tire are the smooth style with tread and not the nobbie style so that might make a bit of difference and I run 30 Lbs pressure.

Bruce
So I enjoy my fat tire bike, so far its been great.

Bruce
 

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With hills in your life I'm pretty sure the early Rad City will prove gutless while the new version will likely be MUCH "sportier". There's a huge difference in the early direct drive hub equipped bikes vs. the newest geared hub version. Much available regarding that difference so I won't repeat it all here. I WILL say, the more you weigh and the bigger the hills, the more difference will be apparent between them. The new 'City also comes with hydraulic brakes. Yes the mechanicals will stop the bike just fine, but after driving both there is little imagination required to know which you'll prefer.

The Ride1up (R1U) is a worthy competitor when compared to the RAD City when considering the 700 model. The difference will be in the HUGE popularity of the RAD bikes, which WILL transfer directly to resale value and how easy the bike will be to sell should you decide to move on to nicer/more expensive bike, or the need to bail on the e-bike plan completely comes up. I'm pretty sure you'll notice the fact many people will be commenting on the support available for the RAD product as well.

I do ALL of my own work on my bikes, mostly because I want it done right, but also because I enjoy doing it. It's part of the hobby for me. Because of this, I am NOT a fan of bikes sold using proprietary parts that must be returned to a dealer for service. The TEK line up are perfect examples of such a bike. The RAD and the RIU are both examples of bikes built using non proprietary parts that can be sourced from most places selling bike parts. That's a big deal if doing your own work, and long term maintenance costs are an issue. -Al
Thank you for your comments. On you your last point regarding the maintenance costs: which bikes cost more to maintain, Treks or Rads & R1Us? And doing my own work on my bikes is not an issue for me. But I see your point regarding Rad's aftersale value.
I guess the term hills was misguiding, I ride in the city in roads with inclines. And considering my rides are short(4-5 miles a day), do you think direct drive hub and geared hub make a huge difference?
 
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I really don't know why so many people out there don't like fat tire bikes. This is the first one that I have owned and I can say I really don't notice a difference unless I am riding on the gravel trails and I find it better on gravel. As a kid i grew up on bikes.

Back in the 60's where every bike we had was just a one speed. Then came the 3 speeds and 5 speeds then the 10 speeds. The old Apollo 10 speed is what I rode as a teen and up. Didn't matter which bike you had when you were a kid, you rode it though everything, ditches, trails, water, jumps you name it. Then in the early 2000 I bought a Raleigh mountain bike with a little bit bigger tire and I rode that everywhere. Now I upgraded to a E-Bike fat tire bike and really enjoy the ride.

I ride it on pavement and gravel. I prefer the gavel because if I am on gravel that means that I am away from car traffic. Where I live in the lower mainland outside of Vancouver they have a huge amount of trail systems for walking and riding bikes. As an example, I just made up a route on my map for a ride and it is about 60 km and only about 10% will be on a road. Starts at my house ends at my house with no doubling back. Some of the trails are paved and most are gravel, but I find the fat tire bike rides smoother over the gravel then the skinny tires. The skinny tires seen to spit out a lot of rocks side to to or slide off rocks side to side, where the fat tire just goes right over them smoothly.

Mind you my Fat tire are the smooth style with tread and not the nobbie style so that might make a bit of difference and I run 30 Lbs pressure.

Bruce
So I enjoy my fat tire bike, so far its been great.

Bruce
That's very good to know. But I don't off-road. I ride only within the city and live in midtown Atlanta. So, I'm guessing fat tire or not is not going to be a big deal, is it?
 
It looks like a Hailong (Shark) pack? Available widely.
AND their battery price isn't bad at all.

The motor could have Satoraid for increased heat reduction.
Impressive bike at the price point IMO.
I'm moving back to DD and GD for my personal daily rides. Keeping two 36V ebikes with BBSxx mids for bike paths.
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That's so comforting to know!! Between the RadCity ST 3 and RadCity 5 Plus, which one do you think is a better deal? I would love to mod a townie but it pushes it out of my range. And I think I'm a light user though I ride 4-5 miles everyday. Its on proper city roads with inclines(those are what I called hills, was not sure how the term gets used).
Also, is the Ride1up 700 a fat tire bike? I'm new to ebikes so unsure of what classifies as fat tire.
 
Thank you for your comments. On you your last point regarding the maintenance costs: which bikes cost more to maintain, Treks or Rads & R1Us? And doing my own work on my bikes is not an issue for me. But I see your point regarding Rad's atfersale value.
When mentioning higher long term maintenance costs, I'm considering the price of parts available anywhere parts are sold vs. the price of proprietary parts you are forced to go back to the dealer and buy.

I made the (expensive) mistake of buying a fatty for use on pavement. That didn't work out well for me at all. If you are considering a fatty, it will likely be worth your trouble to do some due diligence on the topic. At the very least you will enter in to the decision with your eyes open. Same story when comparing the early RAD City's to the newest version. If nothing else, consider the reason the newer RAD's have now switched away from the type power used on the earlier bikes....

Current discussion regarding fat tires with some seriously good info coming from both sides.... https://electricbikereview.com/forums/threads/what-do-you-hate-about-your-fat-tires.47084/
 
And I think I'm a light user though I ride 4-5 miles everyday.
Honestly, I'm not qualified. I'm a kit builder.
But I will say there's a very common thread throughout most recommendations. Riders tend to think their choice is the best. Me? Too many variables to recommend a single eBike model. But RAD seems to take care of business. Hub motors are extremely reliable. @Timpo may be able to ferret out more information. He's a googler extraordinaire.
city roads with inclines
How much of an incline? Location?
Ride1up 700
All the specifications are listed. Wheels are 27.5"(700) Tires are 2.4" wide. NOT a fat bike. FB tires are 4-5".
I like 2.4"-2.5" tires. For me a sweet spot.
 
Honestly, I'm not qualified. I'm a kit builder.
But I will say there's a very common thread throughout most recommendations. Riders tend to think their choice is the best. Me? Too many variables to recommend a single eBike model. But RAD seems to take care of business. Hub motors are extremely reliable. @Timpo may be able to ferret out more information. He's a googler extraordinaire.
Okay gotcha. Thanks!
How much of an incline? Location?
The incline is about 10-15 percent. Midtown Atlanta.
All the specifications are listed. Wheels are 27.5"(700) Tires are 2.4" wide. NOT a fat bike. FB tires are 4-5".
I like 2.4"-2.5" tires. For me a sweet spot.
Cool! Thanks again for the info!
 
Reviewing the Ride1up 700 reveals the reason it has been recommended. An IMPRESSIVE list of readily available components and repair parts. The only weak spot to me is the inexpensive front fork. The Gear Drive motor is an EXCELLENT build! "48V Geared Hub Shengyi Motor, 28mph (nominal rating of 500w)"
 
When mentioning higher long term maintenance costs, I'm considering the price of parts available anywhere parts are sold vs. the price of proprietary parts you are forced to go back to the dealer and buy.
Perfect got it. That makes life easier for me.
I made the (expensive) mistake of buying a fatty for use on pavement. That didn't work out well for me at all. If you are considering a fatty, it will likely be worth your trouble to do some due diligence on the topic. At the very least you will enter in to the decision with your eyes open. Same story when comparing the early RAD City's to the newest version. If nothing else, consider the reason the newer RAD's have now switched away from the type power used on the earlier bikes....
I guess I'm not looking for fatties. Just need to figure out if I'm going with the R1U 700 or the new Radcity. uff. Tough call I guess
 
I really don't know why so many people out there don't like fat tire bikes.
Perhaps it's more of us old farts that have been riding for 60 or more years and are spoiled by incredibly easy rolling road bikes for decades of riding? I'm sure you can feel the difference between fatties and <2'5" tires.

<EDIT> Oops just read you're older than snot too it seems! I had my first SA 3sp Schwinn, 1961. My grandparents made sure I always had a great bike. Not mine but exactly what I rode.
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Reviewing the Ride1up 700 reveals the reason it has been recommended. An IMPRESSIVE list of readily available components and repair parts. The only weak spot to me is the inexpensive front fork. The Gear Drive motor is an EXCELLENT build! "48V Geared Hub Shengyi Motor, 28mph (nominal rating of 500w)"
AMAZING : ) Then do you mind suggesting better front forks that I can swap it out with?
 
AMAZING : ) Then do you mind suggesting better front forks that I can swap it out with?
You'll blow your budget totally. Don't worry, it'll be fine for many miles. Save your change for a year or two. But $300 or more for a good fork. IMO. @PedalUma @m@Robertson are two builders better qualified to comment on suspension forks. I dislike them but used a NOS on my scratch build. Only because I didn't want to change the steering geometry. My friend's less expensive shock on his Townie lasted 10 years. I think age finally got it. Since he rode only on nice flat city streets.
 
Perfect got it. That makes life easier for me.

I guess I'm not looking for fatties. Just need to figure out if I'm going with the R1U 700 or the new Radcity. uff. Tough call I guess
Regarding the tires that come on the 700, they're Schwalbe Super Moto-X 27.5x2.4" which are arguably one of the better tires available right now. They score high to very high on flat resistance, rolling resistance, and ride. They will be tough to beat no matter what they're mounted on. There are 5 bikes in our household, and after several years messing with a LOT of different tires, all use that make and model tire today.....

As mentioned, the 700 has some great specs and is a formidable competitor when considering the new 'City. The difference, as mentioned earlier, is about RAD's popularity. There's very little doubt they are on top of their game. Have a look at the freight on them. Last I saw, they were being delivered through local dealers, something no other consumer direct seller does....

Regarding front forks/suspensions. My experience has been you want one. 😁
As far as spring vs. hydraulic, if you were to ride both on an identical course, I think if that course were paved, you would have a difficult choice picking which were which - assuming only that the spring tensions have been optimized for your size/weight/riding 'druthers. If this course were off road, it would be a whole different world, with the better front end taking a beating that you would NEVER simulate on a paved/hard packed surface. Suggest you ride the bike a bit as it comes, THEN make your call to replace the front end if you think it's necessary. -Al
 
You'll blow your budget totally. Don't worry, it'll be fine for many miles. Save your change for a year or two. But $300 or more for a good fork. IMO. @PedalUma @m@Robertson are two builders better qualified to comment on suspension forks. I dislike them but used a NOS on my scratch build. Only because I didn't want to change the steering geometry. My friend's less expensive shock on his Townie lasted 10 years. I think age finally got it. Since he rode only on nice flat city streets.
Oh shoot!! Will stick to the stock one for now. Thanks for your suggestions.
 
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