Speed Hack - no more limited by 27MPH cutoff ??

I don't understand the question

Still the question is: Do you personally feel safe at 35 mph? Do you secretly like the smell of gas? If your answer is yes, then here you go: http://www.amazon.com/Brand-Black-All-terrain-49cc-Scooter/dp/B00BI210IU/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1418341174&sr=8-2&keywords=gas powered bikes or perhaps: http://www.amazon.com/PK80-2-Cycle-Engine-Performance-Bicycle/dp/B00B0GCZ3I/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1418341174&sr=8-9&keywords=gas powered bikes Why bother with expensive electric bikes when you can have all that speed for 200-300 bucks? I mean really, I see more of these around than electric. Fill 'er up and let it rip. Court! How about reviewing gas bikes too?
 
Still the question is: Do you personally feel safe at 35 mph? Do you secretly like the smell of gas? If your answer is yes, then here you go: http://www.amazon.com/Brand-Black-All-terrain-49cc-Scooter/dp/B00BI210IU/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1418341174&sr=8-2&keywords=gas powered bikes or perhaps: http://www.amazon.com/PK80-2-Cycle-Engine-Performance-Bicycle/dp/B00B0GCZ3I/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1418341174&sr=8-9&keywords=gas powered bikes Why bother with expensive electric bikes when you can have all that speed for 200-300 bucks? I mean really, I see more of these around than electric. Fill 'er up and let it rip. Court! How about reviewing gas bikes too?

I guess I'm the perfect guy to answer this question Calvin, considering that's exactly where I came from. For the last 4 years I've been building, and riding gas powered motor bicycles using motor kits exactly like that PK80 kit.

The Texas DPS considers those kind of bikes to be bicycles. Most of mine top out about 40 mph, but typical cruising speed is closer to 30 mph. The majority of people that build them start out with cheap Walmart style bicycles. Considering I've been fabricating custom parts for my own motorcycles for over 30 years, I probably have higher than average skill to build them. What I've learned is that although they're fun, because of vibration, and poor quality control in China, they don't last very long, especially if you ride them fast.

The ride experience also leaves a lot to be desired compared to an electric bicycle. For one thing there's the constant vibration. Plus they make a lot of noise. Although there's really no legal reason in Texas you couldn't ride one on a bike trail, they're about as welcome as a family of gofers living in your garden. Even if all you're doing is pedaling down a trail without the motor running, if stares were bullets, you be full of holes in about 10 seconds.

A big advantage eBikes have over the gas bikes is no matter how fast they go, they can effortlessly cruise at very low speeds, which the gas bicycles cannot. They're also silent, and unintimidating to pedestrians when ridden responsibly so you can ride them virtually anywhere. The gas bikes, not so much.

That's why I'm puzzled by the attitudes of a lot of eBikers about what a proper top speed for a eBike should be. When most of the gas bicycles, typically of questionable build quality all go 30 to 40 mph, what's the big deal with an eBike that can go 30 or 35 mph. I'd also like to point out that the best cruising speed is usually about 20% lower than the flat out top speed of a vehicle, so in order to be able to cruise comfortably at say 28 mph, you need a top speed of around 35 mph. This will allow you to cruise without maxing out your motor, and battery, which gives you the expectation of longer service life, because your motor and battery will be less stressed.

The reason you need the higher speed is to keep from getting run over from behind in traffic. If you say I never ride my eBike in traffic, that's fine, but it relegates eBike's to the level of expensive toys.

As a side note, I saw a website that specializes in eBike kit's that actually recommends using Walmart style bicycles to build on, because they claim that cheaper bikes are usually heavier, and therefore stronger.
 
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If you would like to speed hack your ebike for faster reactions on private roads here is a video of how to do it. It is done on a BH Easymotion Jumper, but the principle should be the same on every ebike.
http://youtu.be/pa8wjdgV8EE

This hack has not yet been done on American bikes.
You have 350w insted og 250 in Europe so I am pretty sure your top speed will be 45 kmh or a little higher with speed hack.
Remember this will of course effect your warrenty.
It it only meant for use on private roads but in the US it might be legal on public roads.
 
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If you would like to speed hack your ebike for faster reactions on private roads here is a video of how to do it. It is done on a BH Easymotion Jumper, but the principle should be the same on every ebike.
http://youtu.be/pa8wjdgV8EE

This hack has not yet been done on American bikes.
You have 350w insted og 250 in Europe so I am pretty sure your top speed will be 45 kmh or a little higher with speed hack.
Remember this will of course effect your warrenty.
It it only meant for use on private roads but in the US it might be legal on public roads.

Wouldn't a Nitro battery be a lot easier?
 
Wouldn't a Nitro battery be a lot easier?

Yep. But much much more expensive and much better acceleration with booster battery.

I have two bikes and have speed hacked both for a little more than 200 dollars. Two nitro batteries would have set me back more than 2000 dollars.
 
Sorry if this has already been posted but it seems it might be of interest here.


Andrew
 
Hi Peter,
v nice hack, and professional services as well! :)
Just one comment, would the weight be better distributed if the additional battery was mounted on the down tube above the controller? Or is this location too vulnerable and in way of pedalling?

Cheers, C
 
Theoretically yes it is possible but I would not do it myself for several reasons.

1. I was also affraid og the extra weight of the battery so close to the handle bar, but I dont feel the extra weight at all.

2. I have just tried to move my bag to fit above the controller. The downtube is too wide for my bag to fit here. Though might be possible with another bag.

3. I think positioning the bag so close to the ground will make at vulneralble to water when cycling in the rain.

4. If you place the bag on the downtube you will have to remove it each time you charge the main battery.

5. I often swithch between booster battery and main battery when cycling. With the high position the bag sits in now this is no problem. If the bag was fitted on the downtube I would have to step off the bike to do this.

6. I am pretty aware of the V from the booster battery and try never to go below 3.0. In the position the bag has now I can always keep an eye on the alarm.
 
Theoretically yes it is possible but I would not do it myself for several reasons.

1. I was also affraid og the extra weight of the battery so close to the handle bar, but I dont feel the extra weight at all.

2. I have just tried to move my bag to fit above the controller. The downtube is too wide for my bag to fit here. Though might be possible with another bag.

3. I think positioning the bag so close to the ground will make at vulneralble to water when cycling in the rain.

4. If you place the bag on the downtube you will have to remove it each time you charge the main battery.

5. I often swithch between booster battery and main battery when cycling. With the high position the bag sits in now this is no problem. If the bag was fitted on the downtube I would have to step off the bike to do this.

6. I am pretty aware of the V from the booster battery and try never to go below 3.0. In the position the bag has now I can always keep an eye on the alarm.

Thanks Peter, looks like you've done a lot of testing and have it covered. All the best, Craig
 
I guess I'm the perfect guy to answer this question Calvin, considering that's exactly where I came from. For the last 4 years I've been building, and riding gas powered motor bicycles using motor kits exactly like that PK80 kit.

The Texas DPS considers those kind of bikes to be bicycles. Most of mine top out about 40 mph, but typical cruising speed is closer to 30 mph. The majority of people that build them start out with cheap Walmart style bicycles. Considering I've been fabricating custom parts for my own motorcycles for over 30 years, I probably have higher than average skill to build them. What I've learned is that although they're fun, because of vibration, and poor quality control in China, they don't last very long, especially if you ride them fast.

The ride experience also leaves a lot to be desired compared to an electric bicycle. For one thing there's the constant vibration. Plus they make a lot of noise. Although there's really no legal reason in Texas you couldn't ride one on a bike trail, they're about as welcome as a family of gofers living in your garden. Even if all you're doing is pedaling down a trail without the motor running, if stares were bullets, you be full of holes in about 10 seconds.

A big advantage eBikes have over the gas bikes is no matter how fast they go, they can effortlessly cruise at very low speeds, which the gas bicycles cannot. They're also silent, and unintimidating to pedestrians when ridden responsibly so you can ride them virtually anywhere. The gas bikes, not so much.

That's why I'm puzzled by the attitudes of a lot of eBikers about what a proper top speed for a eBike should be. When most of the gas bicycles, typically of questionable build quality all go 30 to 40 mph, what's the big deal with an eBike that can go 30 or 35 mph. I'd also like to point out that the best cruising speed is usually about 20% lower than the flat out top speed of a vehicle, so in order to be able to cruise comfortably at say 28 mph, you need a top speed of around 35 mph. This will allow you to cruise without maxing out your motor, and battery, which gives you the expectation of longer service life, because your motor and battery will be less stressed.

The reason you need the higher speed is to keep from getting run over from behind in traffic. If you say I never ride my eBike in traffic, that's fine, but it relegates eBike's to the level of expensive toys.

As a side note, I saw a website that specializes in eBike kit's that actually recommends using Walmart style bicycles to build on, because they claim that cheaper bikes are usually heavier, and therefore stronger.

Bikenut-
You make an excellent case for the traffic safety of higher speed commutes. The issues to overcome are adequate designs of ebikes to remain in safe control, and legal perspectives on bikes going 25-30mph.

Texas is lenient. Most states are not, unfortunately.

It really bothers me when folks give up their freedom to ride faster and safer in order to appease the corporate lobby for market share of lower powered bikes.
 
Hello. I am using a Flyer T5.1 Deluxe (XL size) and it seems it cuts out the boost at about 23-25kph. I'm just wondering is there a way I can improve this speed? I use it only for commuting on roads (20km a day) and would love to cut down on my commuting time a little.
 
I built a full suspension mountain bike with a 43cc 2-stroke and the Golden Eagle kit a few years ago. I could cruise in the low 30s and maxxed out around 34 mph on the flats (my top speed was around 42 mph down a lengthy hill.) I had no concerns about cruising above 30 mph aside from the fact that the noise drew lots of attention. Having said that, I think that an electric bike would offer significant advantages in the settings I would spend most of my time riding. I think a top speed around 30 mph will be acceptable for me, but I haven't settled on a bike yet. I would prefer that the design incorporate an integrated battery, if possible. I'm looking at Stromers, Easy Motions, and Specialized right now.
 

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They won't do 30 mph.

Stealth, high power cycles, optibike, Falco kits can get up to 30.
 
I built a full suspension mountain bike with a 43cc 2-stroke and the Golden Eagle kit a few years ago. I could cruise in the low 30s and maxxed out around 34 mph on the flats (my top speed was around 42 mph down a lengthy hill.) I had no concerns about cruising above 30 mph aside from the fact that the noise drew lots of attention. Having said that, I think that an electric bike would offer significant advantages in the settings I would spend most of my time riding. I think a top speed around 30 mph will be acceptable for me, but I haven't settled on a bike yet. I would prefer that the design incorporate an integrated battery, if possible. I'm looking at Stromers, Easy Motions, and Specialized right now.

If you're not worried about technically violating the warranty, which can usually be "undone", "dongles" are available for most good e-bikes that will remove the speed limitations and boost you well over 30mph. That would open up a whole lot of other ebikes for your consideration...
 
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