My new Globe Haul ST by Specialized

RHOUSER

New Member
Region
USA
It is less than two weeks old but I am having issues with two controller error codes. They are the same code but one is the controller side (C 032 Controller, No Communication) and one is the battery side (B 032 Battery, No Communication). I love the bike so far, but I am hoping for a solution. My LBS is working with Specialized but the parts recommended for the fix are two weeks out.

The posted fix is to remove and replace the battery. This DOES work but only until the next bump or whatever that again breaks the connection (communication). I am still riding it because I have now figured out that a quick left and right snap of the handlebars (not extreme just enough to jiggle the battery) will reconnect it while I am riding. If the left/right doesn't work, a small bunny hop of the front end will also reseat it.

I saw an earlier web posting that indicated an issue with the lube and connectors inside the controller, but my LBS guru tells me that mine was built after the resolution of the lube. The LBS says
Specialized believes I will need a new battery connector (on the way under warranty). This will take a couple of weeks to get to my local shop and then he will install it under the warranty.

I am 73 years old and traded in my 2018 Carbon Turbo Levo for the Haul ST. The Levo had gotten to be too much bike for my now old guy life style. I have traded in single track for walking and biking paths. I also have done all my grocery, hardware store, and drug store errands on the Haul. I get exercise and a carless trip.

The layout of my Haul is about perfect. Perfection does cost money on this model but I have about every option that is NOT passenger hauling installed and in use. I love the cave panniers (my trash baskets), the front rack and panniers, the rear panniers, 2 bottle cages (one coffee and one water). I even bought the turbo basket with the MIK mount so it is a front or rear click in.

To date my biggest "cargo run" weighed in at 65 pounds and transported effortlessly. The low centers of gravity designed into the carry system are perfect and the center kick stand is right where I need it for loading and unloading.

I don't want to forget the throttle that was and extra. It is worth every cent. I live where there is an extensive system of walking and biking paths with numerous cross walks and traffic circles. I believe in stopping to make sure it is clear to go. This is where the throttle really adds to my safety I believe. It that first few seconds of starting into the cross walk, I simple use the throttle to get going. This allows me to better focus on whatever is happening in the intersection..

This is a long first post, but I guess I had a lot to say. I've only put about 85 miles on the bike so far, but have to say they are 85 miles NOT on my car odometer. I will have to plan some riding that is only for sport, but so far, it has all been Car Replacement stuff and is also kind of fun.

v/r r
 
You know you think that someone who makes this many e-bikes could get it right and ship it and not have this happen so often. I just don’t think bikes should be so unreliable. This is not rocket science.
 
You know you think that someone who makes this many e-bikes could get it right and ship it and not have this happen so often. I just don’t think bikes should be so unreliable. This is not rocket science.
It is not a Specialized Turbo. It is a Globe.
I think the Globe has been forced by the American division of Specialized that wanted a relatively inexpensive, 750 W hub-drive motor, throttle equipped cargo e-bike.

The Specialized Turbo division in Switzerland has recently come up with the Euro cargo e-bike by the name of Turbo Porto. The latter is a mid-drive cargo e-bike with Turbo technology. Of course almost as expensive as a Riese & Müller or Tern.

That way the market has been geographically and technologically split between two divisions of Specialized.
 
I have recently been riding a bunch of bikes at the local Specialized dealer. He also sells many other brands. He wants me to cover for him regularly on the sales floor. The Globe Haul long tail was impressively smooth and powerful. This is not just any other hub drive bike. It is nice. They spent a lot of time and effort refining the feel with torque and cadence input, particularly in the feel at launch from a stop. The brakes are also impressive, as are the accessories. These bikes are taking cars off the road for young families. The $6500 Turn I rode after is very nice and smooth but the Specialized holds its own against it and feels much stronger. Any bugs should be worked out by now.
 
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I have recently been riding a bunch of bikes at the local Specialized dealer. He also sells many other brands. He wants me to cover for him regularly on the sales floor. The Globe Haul long tail was impressively smooth and powerful. This is not just any other hub drive bike. It is nice. They spend a lot of time and effort refining the feel with torque and cadence input, particularly in the feel at launch from a stop. The brakes are also impressive, as are the accessories. These bikes are taking cars off the road for young families. The $6500 Turn I rode after is very nice and smooth but the Specialized hold its own against it and feels much stronger. Any bugs should be worked out by now.
This? From you? Shocking!
 
This? From you? Shocking!
I know. Right! I am capable of growth and change given evaluating new information. I can barley believe that a beautiful Como SL with a Gates to eNexus is priced at $1650. There are no visible wires or connectors on that bike. It does take two skilled hours to unbox and assemble. But that is about the price point of some PAS sensor, ghost pedaling, 67 pound hub-drive with a Tourney and a bunch of ugly wires. I sold one yesterday to someone interested in an Aventon pogo-fork.
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I know. Right! I am capable of growth and change given evaluating new information. I can barley believe that a beautiful Como SL with a Gates to eNexus is priced at $1650. There are no visible wires or connectors on that bike. It does take two skilled hours to unbox and assemble. But that is about the price point of some PAS sensor, ghost pedaling, 67 pound hub-drive with a Tourney and a bunch of ugly wires. I sold one yesterday to someone interested in an Aventon pogo-fork.
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The Como is no doubt a bargain (at the moment) for many folks.....I am not among them. Thankfully I think myself 'too young' for a Como at this point.
Good bike....just not for me.
 
I wonder how much the handlebar is worth. It is a work of art. Yes, it is not aggressive looking and it is comfortable to ride.
 
I wonder how much the handlebar is worth. It is a work of art. Yes, it is not aggressive looking and it is comfortable to ride.
Ya....I s'pose it looks neat. But in fact the handlebars on the Como are a real turn-off for me. It screams 'you can't modify me easily!'.
As you already know I am a fan of Specialized and own both the Vado SL and the Vado. Both models are less proprietary when compared to the Como.
The Como, generally speaking, is aimed at the older and/or more upright rider....many of which don't care whether they will have an opportunity to change out the bars or other bits. The full power Vado is plenty 'upright' for my tastes. Como meets that 'Danish style' niche more competing with Gazelle imo.
 
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@mfgrep, As you know I personally try to avoid proprietary stuff. At the same time I really like design over dog's breakfast Frankenstein. On another thread I mentioned a $435,000 handbag. Some people have a different wallet than mine and other tastes. Some people want a drink with an umbrella over a neat single malt. If I am servicing them I need to accommodate where they are at.
 
@mfgrep, As you know I personally try to avoid proprietary stuff. At the same time I really like design over dog's breakfast Frankenstein. On another thread I mentioned a $435,000 handbag. Some people have a different wallet than mine and other tastes. Some people want a drink with an umbrella over a neat single malt. If I am servicing them I need to accommodate where they are at.
I understand...and I am merely expressing an opinion based upon 'where I am at'. I would wholeheartedly and in good faith recommend the Como to a potential rider who I believe would benefit from that style of bike...and who expressed no need/desire to modify the bike beyond 'stock'. It's a good bike....just not for me.
 
I would wholeheartedly and in good faith recommend the Como
Especially at that price point when they were thinking the could only afford a third-tier bike. Here are a couple of my Specialized Globe bikes. I have made three. These are refurbished 15 year old bikes that I converted. The red one has a trigger to the Nexus. I mixed the paint on the green one for the chainring and fenders.
Off topic, I am working on changing a flat on a scooter. These designs and their construction are horrid. To change a front flat you need to take the wheel down, remove the brake caliper, take apart the two haves of the wheel and remove the rotor. I cannot remove the rotor because they used screws made out of soft metal and over tightened with Loctite. What do you tell a customer?
Edit: I fixed it. It only took 2.5 hours covered in sweat to do a nearly imposable work around that qualifies me as a total nutcase because no one sane would attempt it. The customer asked if I saw the video. I said 'No'. He said, 'Yes, the guy stripped the screws on the rotor and tossed it in the trash.'
 

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