Installing Jones H Bar on Turbo Vado SL 5 EQ?

AWharton

New Member
Region
USA
Hi All!

I've had numbness in my hands and soreness in the back of my shoulders after long rides (+20 miles) on my TV SL5 EQ. I've had a bike fit and we believe we have the back end of the bike correct regarding post / saddle height and tilt. I've seen others in this forum discuss their satisfaction with the Jones H Bar. I'm interested because it appears the rider ends up in a more neutral position without force on the hands and allows for multiple positions while riding.

Here are my questions:
  • Good or bad experience with the H-bar?
  • I purchased a 660mm, SG aluminum Jones H-bar with a 0.5'' rise. How difficult to remove the stock handlebar and replace with the H-bar?
  • What are recommendations on torque wrenches to use when completing the installation?
Thanks in advance for any responses.
 
I recently put a Chinese knockoff of the Jones H bar on my commuter bike. I found the stock straight(ish) flat bar to be uncomfortable on longer rides, so I wanted to try something different.
The handlebar felt more comfortable, but I felt the bar had too much of a back sweep (45 degrees).

I replaced the Jones bar with a Surly Moloko and couldn't be happier. The bar looks kinda odd, but I find the 34 degree back sweep to be just about perfect.
Mine, once again, is a Chinese knockoff. The real Moloko bar is made of steel, while my Chinese bar is aluminum, which I prefer.

Some people like the 45 degree back sweep, while others find it to be too much. I hope it works out for you.
 
No experience with Jones H-bar.

I think your Vado SL could have the wrong frame size for you from the very beginning. Or, the same frame size might not fit all people of similar height. For one, I have short legs but a long torso and arms, and I spent a lot of time to make me fit in the Vado SL cockpit (I had to install a long stem, which affected relocating the headlight... which was a painful experience).

One of the options to make a Vado SL more comfortable is installing SQLab Innerbarends; these are ergonomic, change the riding position and relieve a lot of pain, such as numb hands or back/shoulder ache. However, you have already invested in the Jones H-bar. While I cannot offer any advice to you, I can only hope your install would be successful, and it would help you ride more comfortably! When done, please post pictures and describe your experience. Good luck and thank you in advance!
 
Hi All!

I've had numbness in my hands and soreness in the back of my shoulders after long rides (+20 miles) on my TV SL5 EQ. I've had a bike fit and we believe we have the back end of the bike correct regarding post / saddle height and tilt. I've seen others in this forum discuss their satisfaction with the Jones H Bar. I'm interested because it appears the rider ends up in a more neutral position without force on the hands and allows for multiple positions while riding.

Here are my questions:
  • Good or bad experience with the H-bar?
  • I purchased a 660mm, SG aluminum Jones H-bar with a 0.5'' rise. How difficult to remove the stock handlebar and replace with the H-bar?
  • What are recommendations on torque wrenches to use when completing the installation?
Thanks in advance
I have a good friend - an avid cyclist - who swears by the jones H bar on hybrid geometry bikes. Being able to change positions over the course of a ride helps a lot, similar to drop bars with their hoods, drops, and tops.

have you been doing similar length rides for a while? sometimes it just takes time to get the muscles used to a certain position, and jumping to a much longer ride (although tempting) without gradually working up to it can do that.

I like this small 1/4” torque wrench for all but the heaviest bike components - https://www.amazon.com/LEXIVON-4-In...590&s=hi&sprefix=Lexivon+1/4,tools,150&sr=1-1

I have both the 1/4 and 3/8 and there are a few things that are better with the 3/8 but handlebars definitely not one of them.

are you replacing the stem or just the bar? if the stem is staying, and the bar is the same diameter, it should be very easy if all the components (brakes levers shifter other mounts) are the correct diameter.
 
+1 on the Jones H bar. It made a world of difference in curing my hand & wrist numbness and back pain. I tried a variety of different bars with limited success, but the Jones was by far the best. I also had further improvement by adding a Redshift Shockstop suspension stem.

Keep in mind, every rider is different though. YMMV.
 
It should fit on your existing stem fine, main thing to look out for is length of brake hoses and gear cables - that the new position on the H bar hasn't moved your brake and shifters position too far and the cables won't now reach. It's expensive to change the hydraulic hoses especially.

I changed mine to some swept back bars and the cables were fine. The backward sweeps (like the Jones H) reduce the reach and for me that helps a lot. It's now a very comfortable position and I don't feel so stretched out, though I think the H bars have more of a sweep and are wider.

IMG_3360.jpg
 
I have done the wider H bar on several bikes with great success. I went to them due to a wrist injury (hit by a car) and the 45-degree angle of the bars gave a natural wrist bend that was the difference between being able to ride a bike versus riding the couch instead.

Here's a fairly mundane install. Note I did not tape the inner bar sections. Instead I used the longer grip space to be able to change my grip position which changes my entire upper body position. I can still use the center section if I want but I rarely do as it takes my hands away from the brake levers..
img_20191107_161821[1].jpg


This is also a wider version of the H bars but since I am using it on a 2wd bike, I have less room for grip extensions and (since this is a much more recent pic) I am using Ergon palm support grips to further reduce wrist pain. The short grip extensions would just be done without on the shorter version of these bars.

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This is a substitute I am very happy with as well. It is a very cheap bar: The Ergotec Space Bar. Less than US$30 and less sweep. It is the same width as the narrower Jones H bar, but has slightly more grip length thanks to the narrower center section. This bar also has a small rise built into it. I use this bar on two bikes (the other being my Apostate e-mtb) and am very happy with it.

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Lastly, here is a weird alternative that I have fallen in love with. I would replace my H bars on the white bike above except it can't handle the gadgets a 2wd bike requires. this is the Surly Corner Bar. It uses Wolf Tooth Mega Paw grips on the drops, half a segment of the narrower Fat Paw grip in the short segment just behind the calipers (so when you choke up on your grip behind the brakes you have a little less reach required). Since this pic was taken I taped the top bar with Jones padded bar tape, and extended the horns a bit and used the leftover Fat Paw grip pieces to create a new grip position on the 'horns' so I can comfortably ride 'on the hoods' style.

The short drop of this bar, combined with the rise I have on the stem, means I don't have to lean over so much its not comfortable, but it gives me a very good lean-over position on a bike that is meant almost exclusively for overland trekking. You get a LOT of control from this wide bar, even though it is only 520mm wide (brake lever to brake lever. the drops are wider). Thats pretty wide for this kind of position. But it would also work great with a city bike if you are comfortable with a mild lean-over. The wrist position you get with this bar is ideal for comfort. This bar is probably best loved by riders who are well-familiar with riding in the drops on road bikes.

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I had a Chinese knockoff of the Surly corner bar on one of my bikes, but I didn't like how my Altus shift levers fit I in relationship to the brake levers). Even though I never rode the bike with the corner bar I liked how the bar felt while sitting on the bike.
I've gone back to a straight bar for now, and the bike has been relegated to indoor smart trainer riding, but someday I'm going to mount this bar on one of my bikes.
 
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