Road-e for 2024?

wrshultz

New Member
Any rumors about updated Road-e or Revolt-e models for 2024?

Giant has to be working on something, because the Spesh Creo and new Trek Domane+ SLR models are dominating the market.

Thanks,

Bill
 
When I looked online at ebikes from the big bike manufacturers I was surprised at Giant's limited offerings when it came to e-road bikes.
A Defy-type e-road, similar to my 2018 Defy Advanced Pro 0 would be VERY tempting.
 
All their drop bar e-bikes have vanished from their site. I was chatting recently with the local shop I bought my Revolt from and asked if they had heard anything, and they commented that they assume Giant has a successor in the works since the Revolt was a strong seller for them but didn't know anything for sure. Hopefully thats the case. The 500whr battery for the Road/Revolt/Fastroad has been on sale for a while too.
 
Can anyone enlighten me? Has Giant ever come up with a Class 3 road e-bike (or any other Class 3 e-bike?) If you look to the competition, both Specialized and Trek could come up with Class 3 road e-bikes. Giant seems to be focused on the Euro 25 km/h or Canadian 32 km/h or the US Class 1. The brand seems not to have a "speed motor" in its offering! Necessary to mention road e-bikes such as Specialized Creo are not particularly popular in Europe as these have to be 25 km/h limited, and not many cyclists are willing to pedal unpowered above that speed limit. For that reason, really super lightweight e-bikes equipped with Mahle X35 or X20 are more visible here, as it makes sense to pedal an unpowered e-bike if it is really lightweight, and only use the assistance for hills or against headwind.

Thoughts?
 
Can anyone enlighten me? Has Giant ever come up with a Class 3 road e-bike (or any other Class 3 e-bike?) If you look to the competition, both Specialized and Trek could come up with Class 3 road e-bikes. Giant seems to be focused on the Euro 25 km/h or Canadian 32 km/h or the US Class 1. The brand seems not to have a "speed motor" in its offering! Necessary to mention road e-bikes such as Specialized Creo are not particularly popular in Europe as these have to be 25 km/h limited, and not many cyclists are willing to pedal unpowered above that speed limit. For that reason, really super lightweight e-bikes equipped with Mahle X35 or X20 are more visible here, as it makes sense to pedal an unpowered e-bike if it is really lightweight, and only use the assistance for hills or against headwind.

Thoughts?
Fastroad?

 
Can anyone enlighten me? Has Giant ever come up with a Class 3 road e-bike (or any other Class 3 e-bike?) If you look to the competition, both Specialized and Trek could come up with Class 3 road e-bikes. Giant seems to be focused on the Euro 25 km/h or Canadian 32 km/h or the US Class 1. The brand seems not to have a "speed motor" in its offering! Necessary to mention road e-bikes such as Specialized Creo are not particularly popular in Europe as these have to be 25 km/h limited, and not many cyclists are willing to pedal unpowered above that speed limit. For that reason, really super lightweight e-bikes equipped with Mahle X35 or X20 are more visible here, as it makes sense to pedal an unpowered e-bike if it is really lightweight, and only use the assistance for hills or against headwind.

Thoughts?

o_O

I don't know about the euro market, but here in the US pretty much their entire e-bike lineup that isn't an e-mtb or entry level bike is class 3. They still have the Fastroad (which is their flat bar road/gravel bike), the Explore line and for a while had the Road-E and Revolt E, all of which were class 3. Liv (Giants woman-oriented brand) also makes equivalent bikes. My e-gravel is a Revolt-E and my wife rides a Liv Thrive (the Liv version of the Fastroad). Both are class 3, using the full-power Yamaha PW-X2 80nm motor.

They use Yamaha motors; the Revolt and Road lines used the highest power one they typically use on emtbs. Not sure where you get the idea they don't have access to class 3 hardware, Yamaha makes a great system.

The discussion here is that the two drop bar ebikes (the Road-E and Revolt-E) have quietly dropped off the US website in recent months. My assumption is that Giant let stock dry up ahead of releasing an updated model, but thats purely speculation.
 
No problem. To be fair, I know you're in europe and I have no idea idea what Giant is doing over there. They definitely play games with various regions. Like, they switched some canadian model bikes to the Shimano EP8 a year or two ago, which is class 1 only. Canada has no class 3 equivalent so I guess they figured thats fine. The US bikes have used Yamaha motors but Giant has their own controllers and batteries.

One thing Giant has never had is an equivalent to the Creo or SLR Domane. A lightweight, lower assist road ebike that is oriented towards those who want a mostly traditional road bike with a bit of assist. The Road-E was a full power bike with a 500whr battery. My Revolt stock was in the low 40s weight wise, I'd guess the Road-E was around that as well.

Presumably there are updated models on the way, but what those will be like is anyones guess. My local shop was in the dark when I asked them a week or two ago.
 
It surprises me that the largest bike company in the world doesn't offer a selection of light, carbon e-road bikes, while Trek, Specialized, and Cannondale offer a a number of light e-bikes.
It was in the news that they did have some financial problems a while back, so that may have impacted when they plan on releasing new models that won't generate huge sales.

A fellow I ride with has a Giant Revolt E+. It's an odd bike, in that it has an aluminum frame, but Shimano Di2 shifting. It's the same weight as my carbon framed Cannondale Topstone Neo Lefty 3 e-gravel bike (39 pounds)
 
I agree, but also think that to a degree carbon ebikes are a marketing solution more than anything else. I mean, the giant tubes you need for batteries and motors and such negate much of your weight saving and you don't get the same ride quality improvement. My EMTB is carbon and I can't say its really that noticable over an aluminum frame. But Giant makes excellent carbon frames and you'd think they want to showcase that. And if you want to sell to the high-end crowd they are going to expect carbon.

If anything, my main issue with Giants ebike strategy is they have basically done no stratification of the models. Like, they made one electric Revolt model, whereas other manufacturers offer multiple models with different parts/frame materials/prices. If you want to buy a normal Revolt you have a bunch of options ranging from the $1350 base Revolt up to the 5k+ Revolt Advanced Pro with several options in the middle. Its almost like they expected them to be niche sellers and wanted to keep stock very simple.
 
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