NBD Here is my Specialized Turbo Tero X 6.0

MacGoreth

Member
Region
USA
Have had this bike for two days and I absolutely love this beast. It replaced my Turbo Vado 5.0 IGH which was causing me so much headache. (Slippage, speed issue, motor and radar error.) I had the Vado 5.0 IGH for 1 month and it was a constant headache, and luckily the LBS took it back for a full refund without any problem.

Yeah, spring saddle on a FS bike. I hate the stick saddle it came with, and the fat saddle I’m currently running now is an old spare saddle I found laying around in my basement. It feel’s comfortable, so I didn’t find the need to buy new saddle.

The differences between the Turbo Tero X 6.0 and the Vado 5.0 IGH are nights and days. It beats the Vado 5.0 IGH out of the water.

I know it has only been 2 days, but this has been my best e-bike purchase ever.
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Congratulations!
Although an MTB stick-saddle might not be good for you, I think the fat saddle is absolutely out of place here :) Anything in-between, perhaps? :)
 
Congratulations!
Although an MTB stick-saddle might not be good for you, I think the fat saddle is absolutely out of place here :) Anything in-between, perhaps? :)
I have ordered a

Bontrager Boulevard Fluid Bike Saddle​


Because so many people are making fun of it on Facebook lol
 
I have ordered a

Bontrager Boulevard Fluid Bike Saddle​


Because so many people are making fun of it on Facebook lol
Well, looking better than the "sofa on springs" :) Bear in mind, you have a rear suspension already, it relieves a lot of butt ache!
 
I need to make something similar to get a flat rack on mine. I feel like they left that off just to make it look more like a mountain bike.

Extrapolating from your seat choice to your riding style, you might want to open up the front shock (you'll need a cassette lockring tool with no center pin like the Park FR-5.2) and remove some (or all!) of the tokens. I don't think the default 3 token setup really matches the way most people ride the bike, but that's how it comes from Rockshox.
 
I don’t underst
I need to make something similar to get a flat rack on mine. I feel like they left that off just to make it look more like a mountain bike.

Extrapolating from your seat choice to your riding style, you might want to open up the front shock (you'll need a cassette lockring tool with no center pin like the Park FR-5.2) and remove some (or all!) of the tokens. I don't think the default 3 token setup really matches the way most people ride the bike, but that's how it comes from Rockshox.
and much about bikes. I will check on that with my LBS. thanks for the suggestion.

And for the adapter I made, I used the screw adjustable strap the Thule Pack and Pedal rack comes with, and attached to the RockBros seat post rack. I removed the top plate from the Rockbros rack, and attached it to the Thule strap.
 
I don’t understand much about bikes. I will check on that with my LBS.
From the factory the fork ships with 3 air volume reducers installed. Rockshox calls these "bottomless tokens" because the purpose is to make the shock even more progressive (stiffer as it is compressed more) to avoid bottoming out the fork when you hit something really hard. My bike also came with 2 more the bike's accessory bag. If you're a fairly casual rider, you can get much more compliance over small bumps by removing them.
 
Did a round trip commute of 30 miles, running on turbo mode the whole time. I got home with 5% of charge left, but I think the motor stopped running after it dropped bellow 10 percent. Not bad at all.
 

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I got home with 5% of charge left, but I think the motor stopped running after it dropped bellow 10 percent.
The motor is giving the assistance between the 10 and 5% but is it at the lowest ECO possible, not to be tuned by the rider. Below 5% battery, the assist is practically off.

The difference between Turbo and "low battery ECO" is so shocking you thought there was no assistance at all!
 
That's exactly the type of e-bike that I could use for riding the miles and miles of rough dirt roads that are available to me. Riding them on my Vado 4.0 and now Vado SL 5.0 was/is not that practical due to the condition of the roads and the tires on those bikes, so I rarely do it. The drawback, of course, is the weight, but I could live with that if I could otherwise justify having two e-bikes and had a place to store them. IOW, very good for that particular usage, but not enough of an all-arounder to consider replacing my SL.
 
That's exactly the type of e-bike that I could use for riding the miles and miles of rough dirt roads that are available to me. Riding them on my Vado 4.0 and now Vado SL 5.0 was/is not that practical due to the condition of the roads and the tires on those bikes, so I rarely do it. The drawback, of course, is the weight, but I could live with that if I could otherwise justify having two e-bikes and had a place to store them. IOW, very good for that particular usage, but not enough of an all-arounder to consider replacing my SL.
I wonder how bad the dirt roads are where you live. I'm taking my Vado SL for the Mazovian Gravel 2023 160 mile race where 1/3 of the route leads through the dirt (sand or mud!!!) and forest. The tyres are Specialized Pathfinder Pro 2 Bliss 38 mm (you could probably fit the 42 mm ones on your non-EQ SL 5.0), install them tubeless and ride at some 40 psi. What is wrong with your Vado SL Doug? It is a gravel e-bike with flat handlebars!

The benefit of a lightweight e-bike is you can carry it over a creek... Try doing that with a Tero X :)
 
I wonder how bad the dirt roads are where you live. I'm taking my Vado SL for the Mazovian Gravel 2023 160 mile race where 1/3 of the route leads through the dirt (sand or mud!!!) and forest. The tyres are Specialized Pathfinder Pro 2 Bliss 38 mm (you could probably fit the 42 mm ones on your non-EQ SL 5.0), install them tubeless and ride at some 40 psi. What is wrong with your Vado SL Doug? It is a gravel e-bike with flat handlebars!

The benefit of a lightweight e-bike is you can carry it over a creek... Try doing that with a Tero X :)
looking at the course photos, your gravel would practically qualify as paved in some parts of north america 😂
 
I wonder how bad the dirt roads are where you live. I'm taking my Vado SL for the Mazovian Gravel 2023 160 mile race where 1/3 of the route leads through the dirt (sand or mud!!!) and forest. The tyres are Specialized Pathfinder Pro 2 Bliss 38 mm (you could probably fit the 42 mm ones on your non-EQ SL 5.0), install them tubeless and ride at some 40 psi. What is wrong with your Vado SL Doug? It is a gravel e-bike with flat handlebars!

The benefit of a lightweight e-bike is you can carry it over a creek... Try doing that with a Tero X :)
Nobody would refer to our roads as "gravel". Our landscape consists mostly of "glacial till" and contains clay, sand, coarse gravel, and rocks of all sizes. Unless the roads have been recently graded, there are often washouts from water running across, a lot of washboarding that will shake your teeth out, ruts, potholes, and the occasional small rock that will knock you off-line. Most people who ride them on bicycles -- and there is a large, active group in the area -- are on full-suspension MTBs. I can do OK on them riding carefully and picking a line through the hazards, but it is more work than fun and I rarely try it these days. And as I age, I'm getting more careful about riding in conditions where I could take a fall.
 
Nobody would refer to our roads as "gravel". Our landscape consists mostly of "glacial till" and contains clay, sand, coarse gravel, and rocks of all sizes. Unless the roads have been recently graded, there are often washouts from water running across, a lot of washboarding that will shake your teeth out, ruts, potholes, and the occasional small rock that will knock you off-line. Most people who ride them on bicycles -- and there is a large, active group in the area -- are on full-suspension MTBs. I can do OK on them riding carefully and picking a line through the hazards, but it is more work than fun and I rarely try it these days. And as I age, I'm getting more careful about riding in conditions where I could take a fall.
We only miss rocks in Mazovia. It is the post glacial terrain. It is either asphalt or sand here 😊
 
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