Lectric XP Lite first impressions (I'll update this after I ride)

Slorider

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USA
Well, my Lectric XP Lite just arrived this morning. The FedEx guy just left it by my door and didn't even knock so if you're expecting one perhaps check outside. I only knew because of my Shop (Shopify) app sent me a notification that it was delivered.

The box was relatively undamaged except the handle part was torn and the plastic insert fell inside the box. I can't even complain about that. Good job FedEx! I noticed on the box that "Slime" was checked so it looks like Lectric ignored me choosing no Slime when I added it to cart... Annoying because I know it's going to be a mess to clean up, but I'll deal with it. I was a little nervous unboxing because I wasn't sure what to do but I just lifted the whole thing out and then started cutting zip ties, pulling off plastic and paper. It was packed pretty well, and I haven't found any damage so also very good.

The whole "New bike experience" could have been improved. What I got from Lectric is a "Your package has arrived, thanks for shopping" email. I ordered a bike from Rad and got several emails to include new rider tips and links to an assembly/ maintenance videos. I've heard that their customer support isn't as good as Rad but I'm hoping I won't need it anyways.

The only "assembly" I had to do was attach the handlebars and turn around the seat because it was backwards for some reason. The tan paint looks awesome! I was a little worried that maybe I should have chosen black but no I'm happy with my choice. It's so much smaller than even a regular bike and although it says 46 pounds it doesn't feel so heavy like some cheap Walmart pedal bikes. Even though it's not a step-thru it's nothing to step over it because it's so small. The tires seem more like a kids BMX knobby bike tire vs something you would expect on a e-bike made for city streets. They probably figured that some customers would want to take it on dirt or gravel so these will work on any surface. I suspect you could get more range with a smoother tire but for my use it's only going to be for short trips under ten miles so I should be fine.

The instructions say "Charge before first use" so that's what I'm doing now. I'm waiting patiently because I don't want any problems. I'll reply to this post with updates
 
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I have two XP 1.0 and really think a better choice would have been the XP lite for my uses if it had been available. The 1.0 & 2.0 are just a tad too heavy of a folder and I would easily give up the fat tires on the 1.0, the suspension on the 2.0 and the 7 speed drive train on both to have a lighter, more convenient and not have the maintenance of the 7 speed drive train. Looking forward to updates as you get some use in.
 
Bike is charged and about to go for a ride. If you want some entertainment watch this guy lose his mind over the XP Lite. Some of his replies in the comments are just awesome! I can imagine this guy when he first heard about it he was screaming at his desk cursing saying why didn't he come up with the idea of a lightweight folding E-bike

 
Okay I went for a short ride. Traffic was a bit heavy so I'm going to wait till later tonight for a longer ride. It will also give me a chance to see how well the headlight and taillight work.

One thing I really didn't like and I guess I'll have to get used to is how the pedal assist levels work. On my RadCity 5 it has PA 1-5 and that determines how many watts are sent to the motor. Basically the higher pedal assist number means the more assist you'll get. With PA 5 it's 750, PA 4 a little less than 500 and PA 3 I think maybe 300 watts if I remember correctly.

With the XP Lite pedal assist is just a speed limiter. You get full power up to a set speed then it cuts off. It doesn't show watts but amps on the screen. At PA 2 I had it showing 16 amps so at 52 volts that's about 830 watts. At PA 1 I couldn't tell if it's reduced watts but the speed cutoff is slow low so I'll have to test it more. I do know PA 2-5 is the same power though. It's a bit jumpy sending full power at low speed so I understand why they say be careful with the pedal assist and not to pedal around corners. I mentioned earlier about maybe getting more efficiency with smooth tires but with how that works I would not recommend it. You need low speed traction. Most of my area is flat but so I can't comment on steep hills but I really wouldn't want it to have more power on those flat areas. Of course I have never rode higher powered E-bikes so take that with a grain of salt.

It's a bit bumpier than my other bikes but not crazy bumpy where it was painful or anything. Of course I wasn't jumping curbs with it. I'm not sure if the rims are double wall but I guess I should check before I try. I sat down for most of the ride and it wasn't too bad on rough pavement. The small wheels make it feel agile.
 
Also I thought it be good to share this video. He's talking about the regular XP and not the Lite version but two tips he gives apply. Watch when you take the battery out because it will slide out fast. The key can be damaged by the pedals if you're not careful when folding. He rambles on in the video but it's worth watching.

 
Okay I rode it some more and at night. The headlight is useless for riding at night. I couldn't even see potholes in the road right in front of me. Luckily it dropped in and out of that pothole like a champ and kept going. I lost my grip for a second because I wasn't expecting it but quickly got back on the handlebars. The light has an awesome beam pattern but prob less than 100 lm. If you ride at night either upgrade the light or buy one that straps to the handlebars. I'm not sure how many watts the controller supports so do some research if you decide to replace the hardwired light. Even though when you turn it on it says "Manual" I couldn't figure out if there's an auto function... I mean why would it say manual if there's no auto option?

The taillight doesn't have a brake light function even though the brake levers are wired into the controller. I can understand why they didn't though because even something like adding a brake light circuit costs money and they're trying to keep the bike affordable.

The seat isn't bad and seems to be made well. I've heard lots of complaints about it but if you're used to riding a regular bicycle seat it's not bad. Of course, everyone's different so this could be an upgrade

I think I forgot to mention earlier that I cleaned the brake discs with rubbing alcohol and a new microfiber cloth. I think they had some oil residue on them and that would have contaminated the pads. I would recommend doing that before riding.

I had some questions about pedal assist but I made a separate post about that because this was just about overall first impressions. I think Lectric made a good E-bike for the price.
 
If you want some entertainment watch this guy lose his mind over the XP Lite. Some of his replies in the comments are just awesome! I can imagine this guy when he first heard about it he was screaming at his desk cursing saying why didn't he come up with the idea of a lightweight folding E-bike
I watched as much of his over-caffeinated rant as I could, which admittedly was not the whole thing. I don't really know what he's raving about. Yes, a good chunk of the $799 a consumer pays covers advertising, marketing, and the man hours (R&D) to bring this product to fruition. It's no different than an automobile, but nobody buys a Ford or Toyota and wonders how much less it would have cost if they built one in their garage.

I see wise-guy comments on YT all the time ascribing lower values to e-bikes they can't afford in the first place. Most sound like kids in middle school, but this guy, behaving like a mad scientist in his garage, seems smart enough to know better.
Personally, I'd pay Lectric $800 for this vs. $500 to a guy assembling them at home, but that's just me.
 
I watched as much of his over-caffeinated rant as I could, which admittedly was not the whole thing. I don't really know what he's raving about. Yes, a good chunk of the $799 a consumer pays covers advertising, marketing, and the man hours (R&D) to bring this product to fruition. It's no different than an automobile, but nobody buys a Ford or Toyota and wonders how much less it would have cost if they built one in their garage.

I see wise-guy comments on YT all the time ascribing lower values to e-bikes they can't afford in the first place. Most sound like kids in middle school, but this guy, behaving like a mad scientist in his garage, seems smart enough to know better.
Personally, I'd pay Lectric $800 for this vs. $500 to a guy assembling them at home, but that's just me.
I didn’t watch the whole thing but it was funny. His replies to comments are funny as well
 
I have 50 miles on the blue one. Looks-wise it is pretty sharp for $800. I have a number of 60 and 50 lbs ebikes and scooters. Most are between 2,000 and 6,000 in value but are 5 or more years old. Here is what I will say. The bike is geared so you will be 80 rpm around 10-12 mph or so. If you like to pedal you will spend a lot of time at those speeds because over 13 you have to pedal faster than is comfortable. If you just use the throttle it doesn't matter. This is the key trade-off to save a few dollars and 20 lbs. The bike can do pedaling but it is crudely implemented compared to more expensive bikes. I did my 22 mile home to Baked and Wired in Georgetown yesterday which I have been doing for years. I came back with 50% charge starting from full. This is with mostly PAS 3. I pretty much just pedaled the whole way with an assist because for a first ride I was scared of running out of juice. I live in Bethesda MD and there are hills. I weigh 200 lbs.
Pros:
Comfortable riding positions that you can adjust to move or remove the amount of weight on your butt to your arms.
The weight and size. I have a Class B RV and weight and space are a premium.
The folding hinges are really strong. Had a scooter collapse on me 2 years ago and trust me you want good hinges like this.
The cost, if this gets stolen will be $800 sad. Seems more expensive to me than $800 but I'll pay $800 I guess. Even with my gripes.
Nice pedals. The welgo folding pedals are perfect and finally a bike I don't need to upgrade pedals. Perfect! I love the cost-cutting with quality approach.
The construction is very solid. Does not feel like a cheap bike at all. Mid-tier feel at an eco price.
Tons of room on the handlebar for bells etc.
Sufficient range for my needs. I am ordering a second battery since I'm keeping it and like to do epic rides ;). Also ordering the racks and suspension post.
Seems like lectric bikes have reasonable pricing on upgrades. $99 for racks and a panier seems nice. I have paniers that cost around $99.
I called to change my order, wanted tan at first. People pick up the phone quickly and are very helpful. They use Shopify so I get all kinds of updates on status. I might buy more stock in that company.
The tires are beefy enough. Smooth out the ride a lot. But after 22 miles my back did feel some of the ruts. I had to stand up in the saddle to save my back which becomes second nature. KInd of a con I guess.
The sizing works for my 10-year-old, me 5 foot 6, and for taller riders too. Anyone can ride.
Gets you up hills. Steep hills. There is a lot of power but it is not a rocket. Georgetown has some very steep hills and I could go 10-12 mph with no problem.
Its pretty nimble and fun to ride. Easy to position around bumps and avoid things.
Cons:
The cadence sensor is just a are you pedaling or not sensor. Basically an on-off switch. All my other bikes track torque. This is a pretty big compromise.
No suspension means you are going to need to use your legs a bit more when the road is bumpy.
Assist is based on speed, not power. Pass 1 is like 6 mp. Pass 2 9 mph. It is not an assist level but the speed at which assist stops. Kinda sucky.
The motor is a bit loud but I don't care.
Over 13 mph and you are pedaling pretty fast. This is a bike for people who are ok motoring 100% at 20 mph or pedaling at 12 mph. Avoid otherwise.
Light is weak, but at this price point having an integrated light is awesome enough. 5 years ago you could spend $4000 and not get one.

Summary:
This is a bike my whole family can ride and we can pack up in a car or van that will not throw out my back moving it around. It will get me around the city and campground as far as my body can take being on a bike. I'm ok with 20 mph after being in a 30 mph bike accident a few years ago. Speed is not your friend just your addiction. With two batteries my body and not the bike limits my range. It seems very well supported and the accessories are reasonably priced. I'm willing to trade 20 lbs in weight for an extremely basic assist system since I'm so tired of 60lbs bulky bikes that are just a pain to move around. So far expectations are exceeded.
 
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The tires are beefy enough. Smooth out the ride a lot. But after 22 miles my back did feel some of the ruts. I had to stand up in the saddle to save my back which becomes second nature. KInd of a con I guess.
The sizing works for my 10-year-old, me 5 foot 6, and for taller riders too. Anyone can ride.
Gets you up hills. Steep hills. There is a lot of power but it is not a rocket. Georgetown has some very steep hills and I could go 10-12 mph with no problem.
Its pretty nimble and fun to ride. Easy to position around bumps and avoid things.
Cons:
The cadence sensor is just a are you pedaling or not sensor. Basically an on-off switch. All my other bikes track torque. This is a pretty big compromise.
No suspension means you are going to need to use your legs a bit more when the road is bumpy.
Assist is based on speed, not power. Pass 1 is like 6 mp. Pass 2 9 mph. It is not an assist level but the speed at which assist stops. Kinda sucky.
The motor is a bit loud but I don't care.
Over 13 mph and you are pedaling pretty fast. This is a bike for people who are ok motoring 100% at 20 mph or pedaling at 12 mph. Avoid otherwise.
Light is weak, but at this price point having an integrated light is awesome enough. 5 years ago you could spend $4000 and not get one.

Summary:
This is a bike my whole family can ride and we can pack up in a car or van that will not throw out my back moving it around. It will get me around the city and campground as far as my body can take being on a bike. I'm ok with 20 mph after being in a 30 mph bike accident a few years ago. Speed is not your friend just your addiction. With two batteries my body and not the bike limits my range. It seems very well supported and the accessories are reasonably priced. I'm willing to trade 20 lbs in weight for an extremely basic assist system since I'm so tired of 60lbs bulky bikes that are just a pain to move around. So far expectations are exceeded.
Thanks for this, eDean. Excellent! The cadence on the Propella Mini I purchased (now in the possession of a grand kid, so my only enjoyment of that bike going forward will be vicarious) seems pretty similar, but that bike lacks a throttle. I found myself mainly riding that bike in PAS 3 most of the time (also around 12mph) with a lot of pedal spinning in the higher PAS levels. I'm also used to a mid-drive torque sensor, so I have realistic expectations for the Lite as well, which I now eagerly await as a portable and sharing bike. I ordered the sand color.

As for suspension, bumps and ruts don't bother me much, as rough rides go with the territory. I've never been on a bike with suspension.

I'm also happy to hear the Lite as some hill climbing capability, since I live in a mountainous state.

I am curious about the stand-over height, since a step-thru wasn't an option. I'm still on "the DL" for a few weeks (stupid collision with bollard posts) but my physical therapist thinks cycling is the best exercise I can do. How tall is the top tube on this? (Alternatively, I can easily enter from the rear over 20 inch tires, but probably need to adjust the seat each time). In any case, it's a temporary disability, but I would have preferred a step-thru. (I've had a number of sports related injuries over the years, so I'm like the Six Million Dollar Man, without the six million).
 
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@Doggyman1202 there is a stepover. It is not that high but it is by no means a step though. I do have to lift my leg over the bike and lean it to bring the height down a bit. If you don't have hip flexibility it may present a problem.
 
@Doggyman1202 there is a stepover. It is not that high but it is by no means a step though. I do have to lift my leg over the bike and lean it to bring the height down a bit. If you don't have hip flexibility it may present a problem.
Thanks! I was able to hop on the Propella Mini (also step over) without much of an issue the other day. 20'' tires help a lot. My hip mobility is diminished but improving daily, so I should be able to deal with it.

On another note, Kev Central tested the Lite's hill climbing ability the other day, and compared it to the XP 2.0.

 
I saw that video and made some comments. It was shocking how well the lite took on hills. I rode the Xp through some muddy grass the other day and it did fine, the average voltage used was about 13. No problem at all climbing hills so far. The second battery shipped today so I'll do some bigger trips over the next few weeks. I always peddle yet I want to see what happens if you just do throttle and cruise on my 20-mile Bethesda to DC ride with a second battery. I was thinking, that instead of just buying a second battery getting a second bike that includes a battery. That way my kids and I could ride and I could use the battery from the second bike for really long trips. In 2014 I bought a Haibike XP for 4500 which has about the same specks power-wise as the lite, but everything was very high end (Boshe, nice shimano breaks and shifters, ...) . Batteries were 900.00 for about 400 Wh. I bought an extra one that cost as much as this freaking bike. I could have bought 5 of these bikes for that amount. I'm seriously thinking of getting the premium as well if this bike is problem-free at 1000 miles just because it can be used in so many cool situations. 50 mile throttled range at 28 mph or 100 mile range with assist is something we dreamed about 10 years ago when my friends and I went on our epic rides with backup batteries and charging stops over lunch. A mid-drive with a throttle is a little motorcycle.
 
I am curious about the stand-over height, since a step-thru wasn't an option. I'm still on "the DL" for a few weeks (stupid collision with bollard posts) but my physical therapist thinks cycling is the best exercise I can do. How tall is the top tube on this? (Alternatively, I can easily enter from the rear over 20 inch tires, but probably need to adjust the seat each time). In any case, it's a temporary disability, but I would have preferred a step-thru.
I've been thinking about this toy, and by looking at how top tube lowers below the top of 20" wheel - I would say about 22" where halves of the tube join each other. This is "a little" more than a typical 17-18" step through. Hopefully somebody will measure and report.

What guys were talking about PAS here, speed cut off? Does it mean there is no difference in resistance to pedalling with higher PAS, you don't feel more power to each revolution of pedals?
 
I just put my Lite together. Everything in order, but two issues: I can't close the frame with the battery inserted unless I turn the bike upside down, as someone on Reddit with the same issue suggested. It closes easily without the battery inside, so I'm guessing the battery isn't seated correctly. Obviously, this turning-the-bike-upside-down business will get old quickly. I'm waiting to hear back from Lectric, but in the meantime, has anyone else here experienced this?

The other problem is trivial. I had a tough time electronically (motorized pump) achieving the correct 35psi. I haven't had this problem with other bikes, but I'm wondering if the inserted slime has something to do with the false readings.
 
I just put my Lite together. Everything in order, but two issues: I can't close the frame with the battery inserted unless I turn the bike upside down, as someone on Reddit with the same issue suggested. It closes easily without the battery inside, so I'm guessing the battery isn't seated correctly. Obviously, this turning-the-bike-upside-down business will get old quickly. I'm waiting to hear back from Lectric, but in the meantime, has anyone else here experienced this?

The other problem is trivial. I had a tough time electronically (motorized pump) achieving the correct 35psi. I haven't had this problem with other bikes, but I'm wondering if the inserted slime has something to do with the false readings.
At first I couldn't get the frame closed. I think the battery to controller slots were tight. After a few folds and unfolds, it isn't an issue an longer for me. We have an XP 2 step thru also and closing the frame takes the same effort as the Lite. I really do love the Lite. So fun to ride and so easy to lift into the truck!
 
I watched as much of his over-caffeinated rant as I could, which admittedly was not the whole thing. I don't really know what he's raving about. Yes, a good chunk of the $799 a consumer pays covers advertising, marketing, and the man hours (R&D) to bring this product to fruition. It's no different than an automobile, but nobody buys a Ford or Toyota and wonders how much less it would have cost if they built one in their garage.

I see wise-guy comments on YT all the time ascribing lower values to e-bikes they can't afford in the first place. Most sound like kids in middle school, but this guy, behaving like a mad scientist in his garage, seems smart enough to know better.
Personally, I'd pay Lectric $800 for this vs. $500 to a guy assembling them at home, but that's just me.
Two things stood out in the video. 1. He referred to himself “as a competitor” as regards Lectric bikes. This naturally colors his comments in the way a Chevy salesman might review a Ford. 2. He said if he were making ebikes he could sell them cheaper. When he is making quality ebikes , then he can boast. Until he proves that it means nothing. He does say some useful things, but less ego and theatrics would makes it better.
 
At first I couldn't get the frame closed. I think the battery to controller slots were tight. After a few folds and unfolds, it isn't an issue an longer for me. We have an XP 2 step thru also and closing the frame takes the same effort as the Lite. I really do love the Lite. So fun to ride and so easy to lift into the truck!
Thanks for sharing your experience too, Tom. Lectric is sending some 3mm tape to insert at the bottom of the battery so it fits more securely in the frame. As you suggested though, it might just take a bit more breaking in.

Inasmuch as I dislike the aesthetics of bolted on batteries (such as a Rad folder) I'm not really crazy about this inside-the-frame position either, for more practical reasons. I like what Lectric did on the XPremium with the main battery, which is mounted underneath the down tube. That's the way the battery is mounted on my Priority Current as well, and it's very easy to access.
 
I have had nothing but positive experiences with Lectric. It was my gateway bike to 5 or 6 others. I am actually considering an XP Lite just to have to strap on the back of my Ecar. (colors almost match)
 

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