Anyome tried a Racktime Shine Evo IMM on their non Turbo Vado SL 4.0

I recently had a tire problem and My only option was a 42 which I put on the front keeping the 38 on the rear
I can tell you that it really did soften the ride quite a bit. I don't specifically notice any change in my speed..... Although I'm having a mental complex that that bigger front tire is slowing me down. I really think it's all in my head.
If anyone is looking to soften the ride on Vado SL 4.0....42's are a great option
 
I recently had a tire problem and My only option was a 42 which I put on the front keeping the 38 on the rear
I can tell you that it really did soften the ride quite a bit. I don't specifically notice any change in my speed..... Although I'm having a mental complex that that bigger front tire is slowing me down. I really think it's all in my head.
If anyone is looking to soften the ride on Vado SL 4.0....42's are a great option
Reducing the inflation pressure (if applicable) is another hint.

@mfgrep: Quite recently, I planned a few pretty long rides on my otherwise perfect and suspended Vado SL on 38 mm Pathfinder Pro tyres. To reduce the rolling resistance, I inflated the tyres to 4 bar (58 psi). Then I started hating my e-bike. It became shaky in the first place, and I found the Redshift suspension felt "not that great" anymore. Any attempt of riding on a rough surface forced me to dramatically slow down, and be afraid of a crash; but I did a gravel ultramarathon on the very same e-bike before!

Reducing the inflation to 3.5 bar (50 psi). Such a small difference is like night and day!
 
Reducing the inflation pressure (if applicable) is another hint.

@mfgrep: Quite recently, I planned a few pretty long rides on my otherwise perfect and suspended Vado SL on 38 mm Pathfinder Pro tyres. To reduce the rolling resistance, I inflated the tyres to 4 bar (58 psi). Then I started hating my e-bike. It became shaky in the first place, and I found the Redshift suspension felt "not that great" anymore. Any attempt of riding on a rough surface forced me to dramatically slow down, and be afraid of a crash; but I did a gravel ultramarathon on the very same e-bike before!

Reducing the inflation to 3.5 bar (50 psi). Such a small difference is like night and day!
That‘s what have her bike is running at, the listed minimum, but on the stock Pathfinders which seem stiffer. She’s about 125 lbs so could maybe she could run lower…. For me 5 psi makes a huge difference on my lower pressure (30-40) psi, unassisted, even fully suspended mountain and XC bikes for off road handling. I’m about 150-160 and like to run less than 35 down to 30 psi with tubes 25-30 tubeless. Different tires (2.25) though.
 
Reducing the inflation pressure (if applicable) is another hint.

@mfgrep: Quite recently, I planned a few pretty long rides on my otherwise perfect and suspended Vado SL on 38 mm Pathfinder Pro tyres. To reduce the rolling resistance, I inflated the tyres to 4 bar (58 psi). Then I started hating my e-bike. It became shaky in the first place, and I found the Redshift suspension felt "not that great" anymore. Any attempt of riding on a rough surface forced me to dramatically slow down, and be afraid of a crash; but I did a gravel ultramarathon on the very same e-bike before!

Reducing the inflation to 3.5 bar (50 psi). Such a small difference is like night and day!
Interesting. I weigh 150lbs and currently run 55psi. I remind you I only have 600 and some miles on my vado SL. When I first started out I was running about 65 psi and the ride was very harsh. Reducing it to 55 helps a lot. Currently running a 42 tire on the front. Further softens the ride. There are times when I am genuinely tempted to put a 42 on the back as well.

I swear to you that if you purchased a second wheel set with 42's is loaded up..... You could switch them out and have a completely different bike at your whim.

I might try your suggestion at 50 PSI, however, given my weight it seems a bit low to me.

Aside from grips and pedals, the bike is otherwise completely stock.
 
I might try your suggestion at 50 PSI, however, given my weight it seems a bit low to me.
Please check this out for 38 and 42 mm tyres and for the total weight of your system (150 + 33 = 183 lb). You will soon find out you have ridden on very much overinflated tyres :)


@ckendall check it too 😊

Only do not go the below the minimum pressure for given tyres (unless they are installed tubeless).
 
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Reducing the inflation pressure (if applicable) is another hint.

@mfgrep: Quite recently, I planned a few pretty long rides on my otherwise perfect and suspended Vado SL on 38 mm Pathfinder Pro tyres. To reduce the rolling resistance, I inflated the tyres to 4 bar (58 psi). Then I started hating my e-bike. It became shaky in the first place, and I found the Redshift suspension felt "not that great" anymore. Any attempt of riding on a rough surface forced me to dramatically slow down, and be afraid of a crash; but I did a gravel ultramarathon on the very same e-bike before!

Reducing the inflation to 3.5 bar (50 psi). Such a small difference is like night and day!
Fascinating article. In particular, this got my attention:

"These two factors – suspension losses and hysteretic losses – are not linear. The result: Mid-range pressures actually roll a little slower than either high or low pressures."

I'll give it a go
 
When I was a complete noob in my e-bike beginnings (and on these Fora, too), I was complaining on harsh rides on, e.g., washboard gravel or rough cobblestones. My mentors here were patiently explaining to me that the tyre pressure is the primary instrument of softening my rides, with the true suspension mostly serving to maintain traction of wheels, and comfort suspension (such as Redshift) could only dampen the slow road vibration.

On one nice day, I did the most dangerous mountain descent in my life: It was bombing a steep downhill trail from the summit of Great Owl Mt in Poland. The trail was wide but paved with rocks. (That descent cost me a damage to my expensive camera, too, never mind the details). After I survived the ride, I discovered both front and rear suspension of my premium e-MTB was locked out :) The 2.6" lowly inflated tyres were good enough to enable me to make the downhill ride successful!
 
When I was a complete noob in my e-bike beginnings (and on these Fora, too), I was complaining on harsh rides on, e.g., washboard gravel or rough cobblestones. My mentors here were patiently explaining to me that the tyre pressure is the primary instrument of softening my rides, with the true suspension mostly serving to maintain traction of wheels, and comfort suspension (such as Redshift) could only dampen the slow road vibration.

On one nice day, I did the most dangerous mountain descent in my life: It was bombing a steep downhill trail from the summit of Great Owl Mt in Poland. The trail was wide but paved with rocks. (That descent cost me a damage to my expensive camera, too, never mind the details). After I survived the ride, I discovered both front and rear suspension of my premium e-MTB was locked out :) The 2.6" lowly inflated tyres were good enough to enable me to make the downhill ride successful!
The rains have ruined any possibility of a ride here this morning. Instead I went out and deflated my tires to 40 PSI in advance of tomorrow's ride. I'll update you.
 
Please check this out for 38 and 42 mm tyres and for the total weight of your system (150 + 33 = 183 lb). You will soon find out you have ridden on very much overinflated tyres :)


@ckendall check it too 😊

Only do not go the below the minimum pressure for given tyres (unless they are installed tubeless).

I lowered my psi to 40 and rode 15 miles yesterday and 30 miles this morning. The ride quality is vastly improved in terms of comfort. There is a bit of 'slop' that I noticed at first....'slop' meaning that the sidewalls are more malleable at lower psi....and I could feel a bit of play....a lack of precision....but I quickly became accustomed to it and forgot about it.

When I first got the bike 650 miles ago I was running it at 65psi and as you may recall had a tire 'issue' where the bead was separating from the tread....LBS replaced under warranty. I then lowered my PSI to 55psi for a couple/few hundred miles.

I should note that Specialized markets the Pathfinder Sport (in either 38 or 42) to be inflated "50-80 psi".

40psi is most def under the marketed range for that tire per Specialized.....but well within the range that your 'calculator' indicates.
I might play around with psi a bit more....but I do not anticipate that I will be inflating above 50psi again.

You continue to be a big help to me this summer Stefan....and I appreciate your assistance very much.
 
You are a lightweight person @mfgrep and Vado SL is not heavy either, that's why you could afford pretty low tyre pressure (tubeless would be even better and safer against snake bite punctures).

A story of yesterday:
Currently, I ride Smart Sam 47-622 on my Vado 6.0. The total system weight is around 280 lb. The Calculator suggested 3.0 bar (44 psi) as the Soft inflation pressure. However, the minimum pressure of these tyres is 3.0 bar, too! I took the risk and applied that low pressure. Guess what. It was the softest ride I could remember! The road racing workout group was zooming at 20-25+ mph and I felt totally safe, also because of the excellent road grip of the tyres. The rubber got quieter, too!

Now, any Pathfinder is rated at 50-80 psi and I ride them at 50 psi but I am a heavy person 😊
 
Finito for now. Nothing novel or different on mounting using the Topeak SS straps cut to size with hose clamps and the M-Wave seat collar, but it looks OK and seems solid. I do like the lower profile RackTime ShineEvo rack on this small size bike but its not as narrow. Seems to be enough clearance for 42 tires if we do that. Not using the built in light on the rack. Now we have to see if the wife is OK on the dismount. 🤞🏼 Will probably try that Bontrager rack cited above on her other Turbo Vado SL down south if its not too tall. Trying to find measurements on that. Thanks for the discussion.
Post in thread 'Specialized Turbo Vado SL: An Incredible E-Bike (User Club)'
https://forums.electricbikereview.c...incredible-e-bike-user-club.43468/post-601876

I found the Racktime Standit 2.0 worked well on a Vado SL 4.0.
 
Finito for now. Nothing novel or different on mounting using the Topeak SS straps cut to size with hose clamps and the M-Wave seat collar, but it looks OK and seems solid. I do like the lower profile RackTime ShineEvo rack on this small size bike but its not as narrow. Seems to be enough clearance for 42 tires if we do that. Not using the built in light on the rack. Now we have to see if the wife is OK on the dismount. 🤞🏼 Will probably try that Bontrager rack cited above on her other Turbo Vado SL down south if its not too tall. Trying to find measurements on that. Thanks for the discussion.

Hello @ckendall !

I wanted to ask what size M-wave seat collar you purchased for the frame? I have one coming soon and have been thinking about which route I wanted to go with the rack install. Since I'll be installing fenders also, it seems like the seat collar clamp method is best to keep the fender mounts more accessible.
 
Hello @ckendall !

I wanted to ask what size M-wave seat collar you purchased for the frame? I have one coming soon and have been thinking about which route I wanted to go with the rack install. Since I'll be installing fenders also, it seems like the seat collar clamp method is best to keep the fender mounts more accessible.
If you are going to use fenders.... Can't you use the OEM rack which likely attaches to the fenders?
 
If you are going to use fenders.... Can't you use the OEM rack which likely attaches to the fenders?

I could, but I also have a spare rack already and don't want to pay for the OEM set which are pricey...and hard to find online.

I did get the bike today, and the seat collar size is 30.8mm. That's a bit tricky size wise as I can't find the M-wave in that size (the closest size is 31.8mm). I hope @ckendall can chime in...!
 
I used a 31.8mm rack mount seat post clamp and put a strip of rubber between it and the seat post. I had a rubber strip / reducer left over from a handlebar bell that was perfectly sized. It's solid.
 
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