8+ months of research, 100s of hours, know what I need & want but can't find it

BurroBabe

Member
Region
USA
City
Chemung, NY
I'm new here and never had an ebike, but I've been a cyclist most of my life. Now at 72, still fit and mostly able, I no longer have a car or motorbike for transportation. I live way up in the hills, more than 20 miles from a decent store or farmers' market and more than 30 miles from my closest friends. I've been looking since last summer for serious e-bike transportation. I'm a nerd when it comes to research and science so I've self-educated on motors, batteries, range factors (I was originally researching ev's until I found I couldn't afford them or insurance) and have read and watched reviews of just about everything and gone to every manufacturer's website as well to try to find all appropriate specs. The trouble is, some of those specs that really matter are rarely listed or mentioned! I started with an idea of a budget but it has kept climbing as I learn more and more. I just need to find a bike that has what I need. Here it is:

1. I'm small, now under 5' (down from 5' 1 3/4" when young) but my inseam is shorter than normal for my height, at 27 3/4" to the floor. Forget what bike manufacturers list as fit by height, I have NO standover clearance even on the mid-step of Gazelle's Medeo T9 which is said to fit down to 4' 10", even though the fit is fine once I'm riding (long torso). So, I need a true step-through or low-step. This narrows the field significantly.

2. Lightweight I'm light, 110 lbs fully clothed. Beast bikes weighing over 60 lbs, even 55 and up, are too heavy. Too many reviews never talk about weight, even manufacturers leave it out or make it hard to find. I want to ride a bike, I push the pedals, I don't want to have to depend on a motor all the time and on the flat. And I have a long way to go, as well as loads of groceries to get home and no, I DON'T want a cargo bike. I want a bike that I enjoy riding lots of miles and up and down the hills. And sometimes I have to pick it up. (more about that in #4)

3. Mid drive, natural feel, responsive. Yes, I want a Bosch motor, one that is quiet, a system that responds smoothly and doesn't make me feel like I'm back on a motorcycle. One that lets me pedal with no assist and doesn't feel like I'm trying to move a rock sled but has enough torque to get me and my groceries and maybe my dog up the last really steep hills home.

4. Shock fork. Although most of the mileage will be on paved roads, there are a few miles of dirt roads I must use going in one direction, and they are steep and washboards with potholes. A lot of the roads here have almost no shoulder and what is there is a mix of gravel, rock and dirt. I used to do these on my Trek 520 touring bike with skinny smooth tires but I'm no spring chicken. At 72 after a life of hard work I have serious arthritis in my hands and especially wrists. That means lots of pain a lot of the time. I can't take the vibration. That also means 2 more requirements:

5. Just the right sweep to the handlebars. Here I can't figure out the numbers; again the manufacturers and reviewers don't give sweep degrees. There haven't been many bikes I've been able to try. I tried some Gazelles (135 miles away) and my hands were comfortable. The Trek Verve+ calls their bars "swept" but they were too straight, I can't rotate my wrist inward, and only a little outward so I need the angle to make my hand position neutral. The body position and reach were fine on the Trek but my wrist was really hurting. My fingers are also short so the reach to the Alivio thumb shift was too far away and made me have to rotate my wrist. That leads to the next requirement.

6. Deore shifters are the most comfortable I've used. I've also seen a "microshift" system on one bike I was reading about,but can't remember which. It would probably work too.

7. Range. Remember where I said I live? Yeah, even going shopping is a long haul with no chance to charge up. Except for those big hills I can go motorless or use eco mode most of the time unloaded but I have to have juice to get home with the load. So, I know it's a balancing act with motor ( power + torque = more weight), battery size (more ah = more weight) and range (more weight uses more energy, more stored energy equals more weight, more weight means I need more assist). It's like an unsolvable Zen koan. I have no idea how to figure where the sweet spot is.

If you have managed to get this far you understand my difficulty even finding candidates. I also learned the hard way that I must be able to get on a bike to try it out (or do some geometry matching based on what I have ridden). My first mistake was ordering a refurb Specialized Turbo Vado 4.0 ST from a reputable seller to whom I gave my inseam measurements and who swore this bike was a good fit. I loved how it rode, but the mid step bar was hard up my crotch and pressed all the way up the front of my pubic bone. A stop on the slightest variation from perfectly flat sent me right over sideways. And that is every road shoulder and driveway here. So , my limitations on being able to even find bikes to try within 150 miles has only given me the chance to try the Gazelle Medeos, which I cannot straddle (and I don't want a belt drive), and the Trek Verve+, which fit well but would require adding a shock fork (maximum 50mm travel) and different handlebars of as yet unknown sweep.

What else might be out there? I know the Bosch website lists many other brands that use their motors but they are all unfamiliar to me. If any of you out there, especially other short riders, are familiar with any of these other brands and models that might fill my needs, please give them a shout out. And if you have any other kind of advice on any of these matters that I haven't thought of, I'm open to all suggestions and other edification.

Thanks for reading!
 
I would recommend that you find a bike that meets most of your requirements, buy it, and start riding. Don't let perfection be the enemy of 'good'.

You can always modify the bike to more suit your preferences. Grips, suspension seatpost, suspension stem, and other bits can be added as needed. Just don't buy any bike that uses proprietary parts and mounts.

What size was the Vado that you purchased? Your height is a complicating factor and I'd recommend that you make a trip to a location that allows you to try a variety of bike styles and sizes. You can't modify a frame size.... Start here with a good fit then modify to suit.
 
Last edited:
My opinion, since you are doing such a drastic change in you needs for a ebike then seriously consider a cargo style ebike. They are made for most of what you are looking for. Made to sit lower for load management. High torque numbers to haul said load. Good brakes to stop a heavier load. Larger batteries to move a heavier load. Finally, if a good one is on the heavier side they usually carry the weight down low. Try a few just for the heck of it. You might surprise yourself.
 
Wait, your'e in NY and a nice R&M Tinker Tour is for sale in NY in the For Sale section of this very site!
 
I would recommend that you find a bike that meets most of your requirements, buy it, and start riding. Don't let perfection be the enemy of 'good'.

You can always modify the bike to more suit your preferences. Grips, suspension seatpost, suspension stem, and other bits can be added as needed. Just don't buy any bike that uses proprietary parts and mounts.

What size was the Vado that you purchased? Your height is a complicating factor and I'd recommend that you make a trip to a location that allows you to try a variety of bike styles and sizes. You can't modify a frame size.... Start here with a good fit then modify to suit.
I thought I said that I got a Small Turbo Vado. That's the entire problem, standover height, not frame geometry. This wasn't a big problem with mechanical bikes. All decent manufacturers made small enough triangle frames for my inseam and we could just replace the stem with a longer one to accommodate my torso length. I didn't even need a step through for my touring bike, mountain bike, racing bike or hybrid. With profit based on volume, few makers want to make small enough frames for shorter legged people and even "mid-step frames are too tall.

You probably didn't have patience with my lengthy post and also missed my copiously made post about traveling 135miles to a shop carrying Gazelle who had all 3 Medeo models in "my size" , none of which I could straddle, even though I had told them in advance what my inseam was! So much for trusting bike shops. Then getting a ride 40 miles to a local shop who carries Trek, because I knew XS or S in a true step through would work, but they only had the Verve+ in ebikes and I explained the problems above.

" ". Thank you for answering the question about upgrades! But could you also address the question I asked, Will 50mm of travel be enough for my arthritic hands and washboard roads? Because that is a limiting factor. Also, the Range question (and torque/power Q). That's something that cannot be fixed on every bike. If I run out of juice on the way home I won't make up up that steep dirt washboard road and I won't even be able to push the bike!

A propos of that last paragraph, I only checked out the Verve+ because someone about 100 mi away is selling a 2022 Verve+ 3 with a 500 wh battery for $1499. If that bike would work with the fork and handlebar upgrades, then it might be worth it. But I don't know about range and power. what do you think? I don't know if the '22s also had the range boost capacity of a second battery pack.
 
" ". Thank you for answering the question about upgrades! But could you also address the question I asked, Will 50mm of travel be enough for my arthritic hands and washboard roads? Because that is a limiting factor. Also, the Range question (and torque/power Q). That's something that cannot be fixed on every bike. If I run out of juice on the way home I won't make up up that steep dirt washboard road and I won't even be able to push the bike!
Only you would be able to answer this question. You seem to have more requirements when compared to the typical buyer. You will need to spend the time and efforts to find a bicycle that you find acceptable.
 
Only you would be able to answer this question. You seem to have more requirements when compared to the typical buyer. You will need to spend the time and efforts to find a bicycle that you find acceptable.
Wait, your'e in NY and a nice R&M Tinker Tour is for sale in NY in the For Sale section of this very site!
Scooter, I'm a newbie, I tried multiple searches and cannot find a for sale section or even that bike! Help me get there please!
 
I have to say a 20" tire bike like the R&M tinker tour would rattle my teeth even on pavement.
Your requirements match up to a cargo bike, except for the suspension front fork. I would buy a Blix Packa, https://blixbike.com/products/packa-electric-cargo-bike after I checked with the factory that it had a standard size front tube. Then put an air suspension fork on it. The thing with air, light will be too stiff, with supplies will be bottomed out. You will have to set the air pressure low on the outbound leg, then pump up the pressure at the grocery for the return. I use a lyzene pump, about $60. They have one now with a handle and a mini-stand that is not such a pain in the hands to use. Same price. I carry up to 80 lb on the back of my bodaboda. 23 miles from the complete grocery to my summer property, 7 miles from the low selection small town grocery.
Shifter, handlebar, you can change that stuff after you receive it. You will not like the straight bar on the packa, but being short with short limbs the extra setback of a cruiser bar should not be a problem. I buy parts at modernbike.com in IA or universalcycles.com in PA. Watch location with universal, they will ship 3 boxes at >$10 each if you select stock from 3 warehouses. Notice the $1600 price on the white packa now, lots of room to accessorize for less money than a used R&M. Last I looked at the brand forum, Blix had 1 complaint on the known problems thread with 8 years of history.
The weight of the cycle? Weight matters lifting the cycle onto a car carrier, not rolling the bike around IMHO. I weigh 160, 68" with 28" inseam, and I do not have a problem steering or balancing 94 lb. 20 lb of it is low in the pannier, tools water tire & tubes, about 10" above the road. I load the 2 liter bottles low too. The front basket mount (frame mounted) of the packa will allow you to load weight on the front and balance the front to rear mass so the rear of the bike does not waggle you around. I have my 9 lb motor on the front of my bodaboda, also the 10 lb battery. You cannot buy a bodaboda anymore. You cannot buy any bike with a front motor. Later after the warranty is out you could change the packa rear motor out to a different front one. As far as the boogerbear of geared hub motors & grades, IMHO there is not a grade in NY state that will burn up a 750 w geared hub motor. Not unless you load it up to the 400 lb limit and ride very slowly up 15% for more than 30 minutes. I have 70 hills, some 12% on my 27 miles commute to my summer property in Clark Cty IN. No problem. I pedal about 80% unpowered, on the flat and down hill, uphill to about 5%. I'm age 73. I have more trouble with 30 mph headwinds than I do with weight. A geared hub motor does not drag unpowered, by contrast with the lower 3 models of a bosch which spins the motor with your feet. A shimano or yamaha or brose mid do not drag the motor with your feet unpowered.
Happy shopping and later riding.
 
Last edited:
Hi Babe,
Yes I know were you live, I'm from Broome County and all of your study leads me to believe that you may mislead yourself about that NEW YORK CITY bike you're on your way to see." (hint "Electrify" a capable well fitting suspended bicycle with the newest utah battery pack and BBS02 ) or have it built for you?
why
'20 miles from a decent store or farmers' market miles of dirt roads I must use going in one direction, and they are steep and washboards with potholes. A lot of the roads here have almost no shoulder and what is there is a mix of gravel, rock and dirt.torque to get me and my groceries and maybe my dog up the last really steep hills home"
2004Cannondale.jpg
 

Attachments

  • Cockpit.jpg
    Cockpit.jpg
    898.1 KB · Views: 38
Five months ago, I bought my fourth ebike, an Aventon Abound, a cargo bike which seems to be based on a European design. It weighs 85 pounds,
I like the look and price of that bike. Seems like a good deal for a true cargo bike. I can't imagine getting the range you are getting, but great to hear it is working out so well for you. Too bad about having to swap out the BB. Lots of companies are adding Torque Sensors because it's a checkbox that a lot of buyers have been told to look for; unfortunately not all implementations are created equal.
 
@BurroBabe, you are right in thinking the right fit is probably the most important thing to consider. In your case it is probably worth spending the money to get the right size frame.

You asked what else is out there:
The Tern HSD has front suspension. The Tern NBD has a low step (15.4" off the ground), but no suspension. Both have Bosch Performance Line motors which, unfortunately in my experience, are on the whimpy side. For a more powerful Bosch Cargo Line motor you have to step up to the Tern GSD, which has a higher step-thru.

Some of your requirements are contradictory. You say you want to haul stuff but do not want a cargo bike. You want "a bike that I enjoy riding lots of miles and up and down the hills." I can assure you that a cargo bike will not lessen the enjoyment of the rides you describe. If you were riding technical mountain trails, a cargo bike would not be appropriate.

Finally, ebikes are heavy. The ones that are light, such as some Specialized models, do not have the frame geometry you need, nor the range, nor the power.
 
With your medical conditions and wants, you have to decide what you can compromise on. It’s like trying to find an iideal spouse 😆. Will never get all you “want” but hopefully you can find what works well enough.

Suggest you look at the lighter weight gravel or even road biikes that allow very wide tires, and run those at low pressures. Change out for suspension seatposts and
stem/handlebars. And consider lightweight bikes with optional battery extenders.

How about step throughs like the Lemond Dutch? Pricey, but lightweight and a work of art.
 
With your medical conditions and wants, you have to decide what you can compromise on. It’s like trying to find an iideal spouse 😆. Will never get all you “want” but hopefully you can find what works well enough.

Suggest you look at the lighter weight gravel or even road biikes that allow very wide tires, and run those at low pressures. Change out for suspension seatposts and
stem/handlebars. And consider lightweight bikes with optional battery extenders.

How about step throughs like the Lemond Dutch? Pricey, but lightweight and a work of art.
Ideal spouse! Someone at work gave us the triangle to choose from when picking a women you fancy. Now you can only choose 2. Your choices:
She's hot!
She's crazy!
She's married!
Again, you can only choose 2.

My local machine shop has a triangle:
Price.
Quality
Turnaround time.
You can only pick 2.
When I first went there I picked price and quality. I told him if I needed it done quick I would have brought the part in much earlier. He liked my honesty and did the job in 3 business days. I won that round!
 
I'm new here and never had an ebike, but I've been a cyclist most of my life. Now at 72, still fit and mostly able, I no longer have a car or motorbike for transportation. I live way up in the hills, more than 20 miles from a decent store or farmers' market and more than 30 miles from my closest friends. I've been looking since last summer for serious e-bike transportation. I'm a nerd when it comes to research and science so I've self-educated on motors, batteries, range factors (I was originally researching ev's until I found I couldn't afford them or insurance) and have read and watched reviews of just about everything and gone to every manufacturer's website as well to try to find all appropriate specs. The trouble is, some of those specs that really matter are rarely listed or mentioned! I started with an idea of a budget but it has kept climbing as I learn more and more. I just need to find a bike that has what I need. Here it is:

1. I'm small, now under 5' (down from 5' 1 3/4" when young) but my inseam is shorter than normal for my height, at 27 3/4" to the floor. Forget what bike manufacturers list as fit by height, I have NO standover clearance even on the mid-step of Gazelle's Medeo T9 which is said to fit down to 4' 10", even though the fit is fine once I'm riding (long torso). So, I need a true step-through or low-step. This narrows the field significantly.

2. Lightweight I'm light, 110 lbs fully clothed. Beast bikes weighing over 60 lbs, even 55 and up, are too heavy. Too many reviews never talk about weight, even manufacturers leave it out or make it hard to find. I want to ride a bike, I push the pedals, I don't want to have to depend on a motor all the time and on the flat. And I have a long way to go, as well as loads of groceries to get home and no, I DON'T want a cargo bike. I want a bike that I enjoy riding lots of miles and up and down the hills. And sometimes I have to pick it up. (more about that in #4)

3. Mid drive, natural feel, responsive. Yes, I want a Bosch motor, one that is quiet, a system that responds smoothly and doesn't make me feel like I'm back on a motorcycle. One that lets me pedal with no assist and doesn't feel like I'm trying to move a rock sled but has enough torque to get me and my groceries and maybe my dog up the last really steep hills home.

4. Shock fork. Although most of the mileage will be on paved roads, there are a few miles of dirt roads I must use going in one direction, and they are steep and washboards with potholes. A lot of the roads here have almost no shoulder and what is there is a mix of gravel, rock and dirt. I used to do these on my Trek 520 touring bike with skinny smooth tires but I'm no spring chicken. At 72 after a life of hard work I have serious arthritis in my hands and especially wrists. That means lots of pain a lot of the time. I can't take the vibration. That also means 2 more requirements:

5. Just the right sweep to the handlebars. Here I can't figure out the numbers; again the manufacturers and reviewers don't give sweep degrees. There haven't been many bikes I've been able to try. I tried some Gazelles (135 miles away) and my hands were comfortable. The Trek Verve+ calls their bars "swept" but they were too straight, I can't rotate my wrist inward, and only a little outward so I need the angle to make my hand position neutral. The body position and reach were fine on the Trek but my wrist was really hurting. My fingers are also short so the reach to the Alivio thumb shift was too far away and made me have to rotate my wrist. That leads to the next requirement.

6. Deore shifters are the most comfortable I've used. I've also seen a "microshift" system on one bike I was reading about,but can't remember which. It would probably work too.

7. Range. Remember where I said I live? Yeah, even going shopping is a long haul with no chance to charge up. Except for those big hills I can go motorless or use eco mode most of the time unloaded but I have to have juice to get home with the load. So, I know it's a balancing act with motor ( power + torque = more weight), battery size (more ah = more weight) and range (more weight uses more energy, more stored energy equals more weight, more weight means I need more assist). It's like an unsolvable Zen koan. I have no idea how to figure where the sweet spot is.

If you have managed to get this far you understand my difficulty even finding candidates. I also learned the hard way that I must be able to get on a bike to try it out (or do some geometry matching based on what I have ridden). My first mistake was ordering a refurb Specialized Turbo Vado 4.0 ST from a reputable seller to whom I gave my inseam measurements and who swore this bike was a good fit. I loved how it rode, but the mid step bar was hard up my crotch and pressed all the way up the front of my pubic bone. A stop on the slightest variation from perfectly flat sent me right over sideways. And that is every road shoulder and driveway here. So , my limitations on being able to even find bikes to try within 150 miles has only given me the chance to try the Gazelle Medeos, which I cannot straddle (and I don't want a belt drive), and the Trek Verve+, which fit well but would require adding a shock fork (maximum 50mm travel) and different handlebars of as yet unknown sweep.

What else might be out there? I know the Bosch website lists many other brands that use their motors but they are all unfamiliar to me. If any of you out there, especially other short riders, are familiar with any of these other brands and models that might fill my needs, please give them a shout out. And if you have any other kind of advice on any of these matters that I haven't thought of, I'm open to all suggestions and other edification.

Thanks for reading!
Hello,
Have you met with a 'certified' bike fitter at a knowledgable bike shop you trust. Someone you're comfortable with
their advice ? You said you didn't want to depend on the motor all the time, 'push the pedals' At 110 lbs fully
clothed' it sounds like you'll need a bike with some serious gearing to compensate for your lack of total mass or some
very powerful legs...I'm not an expert in this area, but this point jumped out at me.

At 8 + months and 100s of hours of research, If you haven't found a bike by now, It doesn't exist or perhaps
you really enjoy the 'hunt' for one ( which is just fine). Getting back to my opening thought. I'd locate a LBS
you trust and respect ( like the shop I use )...

To be fair, if you find a shop, don't make them your research library. With all the prep work you've done,
you should be able go to 'that certain shop', with your narrowed down your priorities, talk with and possibly
have the bike fitter take some measurements and buy / order your bike in one, maybe two maximum visits.

As far as EBR folks offering guidance, you'll get as many different opinions as posters, adding to the confusion.
I have three e-bikes all set up to my comfort and standards. I'm extremely happy with the results...I've ridden
12,000 + miles and every ride is just like the first, 6 years ago. My e-Bikes are Treks so I started from a
solid position. You could hop on my bikes and say no way, any day.

Good luck,
John
 
I'd ridden thousands of miles on my 25-pound bicycle when it was stolen from my basement. I bought a 270-pound motorcycle. Before taking it on the road, I spent a month riding on rough fields and steep hills. I discovered that the low center of mass made it easier to handle than a bicycle.

Five months ago, I bought my fourth ebike, an Aventon Abound, a cargo bike that weighs 85 pounds. I thought of it as lighter than the others until the other day, when I had to lift it to park it on a walk.

It seems lighter than the others because its center of mass is lower. It was designed low so that handling wouldn't be clumsy even with 150 pounds on the rack. The high handlebars also make it easier to control the weight. The front suspension and suspension seat post made it relatively comfortable even before I modified it. The stepover height is only about 20 inches.

Immediately, I changed to Schwalbe Pickup tires for puncture resistance. With the rotary Shimano shifter, I couldn't see what gear I was in. I changed to the cheap Shimano shifter where you press a button to shift up and push a lever to shift down. The unusually long cable cost more than the shifter.

Reviewers said the torque sensor gave impressive battery life. I pedal without assistance when possible and found that bottom bracket bearing friction under load was exhausting me. It pedals much better since I replaced the torque sensor with a conventional bottom bracket, using the thumb throttle for assistance. (In view of your light weight, the torque sensor bearings may stand up to your pedaling very well.)

I recharge when the battery gets down to about 50%. That's about 170 miles, so I guess I could go about 340 on a charge, and there's almost no flat pavement around here.

It might be worth a test ride.
Spokewrench,
Thank you so much for your detailed answer. You are not the first to suggest the cargo option, and I will try it out as the closest ebike dealer is the ATV store just 13 miles away. However, the biggest barrier is weight to lift. I will have to lift it sometimes, to get into a shed when not riding, to lock it when out shopping, etc. I just saw the orthopedic surgeon about my wrist only to find that it is damaged so far beyond repair that all they could do is fuse it. Nope, I go to another in a few weeks to see about just having nerves removed to reduce pain. That also means no grip shifters, I can't do that. My primary objection to Aventon, besides weight of every bike, is the way the assist surges unnaturally, even if I start out without assist and add the lowest level once moving. And it cannot be adjusted.

I do want to be able to ride unassisted most of the time while in the Valley. I have read that the best newer motors do not have the interior bearing multiplier that adds drag. Bosch in particular. I didn't feel any drag on the Trek Verve+2 (Bosch performance line speed?)

I'm incredibly impressed by your range though! 170mi using only 50%? That's incredible. No hills?
Hi Babe,
Yes I know were you live, I'm from Broome County and all of your study leads me to believe that you may mislead yourself about that NEW YORK CITY bike you're on your way to see." (hint "Electrify" a capable well fitting suspended bicycle with the newest utah battery pack and BBS02 ) or have it built for you?
why
'20 miles from a decent store or farmers' market miles of dirt roads I must use going in one direction, and they are steep and washboards with potholes. A lot of the roads here have almost no shoulder and what is there is a mix of gravel, rock and dirt.torque to get me and my groceries and maybe my dog up the last really steep hills home"View attachment 175141
 
Hi Babe,
Yes I know were you live, I'm from Broome County and all of your study leads me to believe that you may mislead yourself about that NEW YORK CITY bike you're on your way to see." (hint "Electrify" a capable well fitting suspended bicycle with the newest utah battery pack and BBS02 ) or have it built for you?
why
'20 miles from a decent store or farmers' market miles of dirt roads I must use going in one direction, and they are steep and washboards with potholes. A lot of the roads here have almost no shoulder and what is there is a mix of gravel, rock and dirt.torque to get me and my groceries and maybe my dog up the last really steep hills home"View attachment 175141
Hey Mike, yours has been the most helpful reply I have received, right to the point answering my specific needs! And I love the look of your bike. I'm so happy to hear from someone so close by as well; you really know the terrain, and the weather. So I'm hoping you can answer a few questions that would make electrifying the bike I have that I think would work best possible.

My Trek 200 hybrid, aluminum, mid-step, 26" x1.95" tires, RST front shock is perfect for this terrain. The two changes I would have to make would be the shifters and the brakes. It is a 3 x 7 gear with Shimano Altus derailleur which is fine but the shifters are SRAM grip shifters. I can't move grip shifters with my arthritis. As I think I mentioned, the only shifters I have found comfortable are the Shimano Deore because of the trigger shifters with a short throw and using thumb and forefinger rather than the Shimano shifters that have both triggers worked by the thumb. I've read about Microshift but never tried them, but know they have ones made for small hands/short fingers so they would probably work fine too. Could you advise me on whether there are shifters that would work with these gears/derailleur or would it be better to switch out the entire component group?

The second issue is brakes. I will assume that I need to upgrade to disc brakes, both for reliable stopping with the added motor power/speed and the limits on my hand strength. Although I know I can upgrade to a different front shock fork with braze-ons for disc brakes, what about the rear? Or is there a way to add discs without braze-ons?

And then the final question, and the biggest one. . . can I hire you to do the conversion, seriously? It's not that I'm not mechanically inclined, it's that my hands really don't work very well for holding tools and turning screws anymore. You can PM me for a discussion on this last request. pleeeeease! 🥹
 
Back