The E-Classic Plus

Doggyman1202

Active Member
I was suggesting various e-bikes to my adult nephew who I would describe as e bike-curious, but still resistant. The new E Classic Plus looks like a potentially promising transition bike on paper, but there are no actual reviews I could find thus far. (Judging by the YT comment section, some viewers seem to think e-bikes just magically fall into the hands of "influencers", such as Court, Micah, et. al.).

Personally, I like the minimalism, and most of the cost/design compromises: A belt drive with a simple IGH and hydraulic brakes at this price point is impressive. I consider the lack of throttle a "feature-not-a-bug", but I know that's a contrarian point of view. Other pluses are relatively light weight and upright riding position. I have no knowledge or opinion about the uncommon front hub motor. The biggest question mark though is the apparent lack of a torque sensor. Perhaps it's not necessary on a low power, front hub design but I am hesitant to really recommend this bike without real world feedback.

So...have any intrepid EBR members pulled the trigger on one of these?
 
Hello! I’ve just gotten the bicycle and only ridden it once (home from Priority’s office), but am enjoying it thus far and happy to answer any questions to the best of my novice abilities.

This is my first e-bike, so I really have no idea what I’m talking about: take everything with that perspective. The pedal assist was great—powerful without feeling overwhelming. My cardio is dreadful so going up the Brooklyn Bridge would’ve been tough with no help: I used mostly level 1 and 2 pedal assist, popping briefly up to a level 3, but only for about 15 seconds. I took the ride from Tribeca to Prospect Park primarily at assist level 1 or completely off; except for the bridge incline which I used as an opportunity to test the power. I could’ve got up the incline on a level 2 with mild-to-moderate effort.

I hoped the breaks would feel a bit sharper—they’re rather squishy—but I think that has more to do with my own uninformed expectations. The frame feels sturdy and rides lighter than my slightly lighter-weight non-electric Dutch-style Gazelle, but some of the peripherals feel cheap, like the break handles and gearing interface, in a way that the Gazelle didn’t. I wish it was five rather than three gears for a little more mix-and-matching capability with the assist levels, but frankly three is all I really need getting around New York so that desire is more down to greed or fussiness!

There’s an odometer, speedometer, and battery indicator on the assist interface, as well as a ‘walk mode’ which engages the assist when you’re pushing to bike up a hill. The front and rear light are also controlled from that interface—the interface can be powered on without the pedal assist active to use the lights.
 
Hello! I’ve just gotten the bicycle and only ridden it once (home from Priority’s office), but am enjoying it thus far and happy to answer any questions to the best of my novice abilities.

This is my first e-bike, so I really have no idea what I’m talking about: take everything with that perspective. The pedal assist was great—powerful without feeling overwhelming. My cardio is dreadful so going up the Brooklyn Bridge would’ve been tough with no help: I used mostly level 1 and 2 pedal assist, popping briefly up to a level 3, but only for about 15 seconds. I took the ride from Tribeca to Prospect Park primarily at assist level 1 or completely off; except for the bridge incline which I used as an opportunity to test the power. I could’ve got up the incline on a level 2 with mild-to-moderate effort.

I hoped the breaks would feel a bit sharper—they’re rather squishy—but I think that has more to do with my own uninformed expectations. The frame feels sturdy and rides lighter than my slightly lighter-weight non-electric Dutch-style Gazelle, but some of the peripherals feel cheap, like the break handles and gearing interface, in a way that the Gazelle didn’t. I wish it was five rather than three gears for a little more mix-and-matching capability with the assist levels, but frankly three is all I really need getting around New York so that desire is more down to greed or fussiness!

There’s an odometer, speedometer, and battery indicator on the assist interface, as well as a ‘walk mode’ which engages the assist when you’re pushing to bike up a hill. The front and rear light are also controlled from that interface—the interface can be powered on without the pedal assist active to use the lights.
I suppose I should mention something about myself if you’re trying to get context for specific family members. I’m a 5’5 115lbs woman riding 90% around the city with occasional weekend trips upstate riding on paved trails. I bought the step through model which is a one-size-fits-most frame, while the step over comes in two sizes. I like an upright posture and the step through is just about big enough to maintain that, but if I were any taller my seat would be almost level with the handlebar. Frankly the step through is pretty high so I wouldn’t recommend it and would rather suggest the step over model so one could get a better fit.
 
Thanks for thorough analysis! It’s a little hard to visualize the frame fitting without climbing aboard but perhaps the responsive support staff at Priority could suggest some handlebar adjustments.
 
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