Budget E-Bike list of Full Suspension, Integrated Batteries 900-2000$

Aventon Sinch

Lectric XP Step-thru 2.0

Ride 1 Up Turris step-thru

Last comments. Full suspension is NOT needed for gravel trail and road riding for a 100lb person. I am three of your wife presently, and have no issue riding a hardtail - fat tires are all the cushion needed here.

At her height, a step-thru is probably ideal, it mitigates the stand-over height issue when stopped and mounting/dismounting.

Aventon does sell through local dealers as well - Aventon dealer network
 
I have a friend who loves Amazon for all the wrong reasons. He's cheap and can make a penny scream. Here's how this affects him. He has a motor scooter. Something wears-out or breaks. The OEM part is $50 but Amazon has the "same" part for $35. So he orders it and it doesn't fit or work correct for whatever reason. He returns and tries again with another no-name part. Same results. So what does he do next? A used vendor on ebay. Pays $30 for a used already worn part. And guess what, he looks at ebikes on Amazon to replace his scooter.

He finds all these great deals from Chinese vendors and notes how they have more power and features for less than known Direct To Customer brands. Who's gonna do the warranty work if needed? Will any local bike shops even look at it if needed? Can you get replacement parts and will they work?

I hate mystery adventures myself. I guess if the item is just a toy and I'm not relying on it for reliability or safety than I might take a chance. So good luck on your Amazon ebike purchase. Let us know what you get and do a follow up on its reliability.
 
Honestly for a full suspension bike in that price range i would just go to Walmart and get one of these, at least it has an air shock and a nice torque sensing middrive motor! With a few upgrades these can actually be solid bikes and at $1500 bucks i think they are good value.
 
I think you all are very nice to reply to this absurd request for your opinion on these bad bikes.
 
  • Haha
Reactions: rtp
To be blunt, that bike looks like junk but its marketing team invested in a nice web site to hawk it.

The $999 sale price (not $850) is with mechanical brakes. Also you have to realize that suspension costs additional money to put into a bike design, and if you are seeing full suspension on a bike for the low price of a thousand bucks (yes this is a low price as ebikes go) then that price only is arrived at by cutting every corner possible. For instance a 672 wh battery is tiny. From their web page:


Ignoring the spelling error (there are many throughout) ask yourself what "MSDS certified" is. A Material Safety Data Sheet has nothing to do with safety certification. They are just throwing acronyms out under the assumption that the layman is too ignorant to know any better. And if you've been around for awhile you will know there are countless bogus claims of safety certification for batteries. The fact they have thrown in MSDS for good measure just reinforces the fact that they are playing you.

The rear suspension shock looks terrible - a tiny little thing not suitable for anything but maybe a kid's bike. Maybe. You can expect the suspension fork to be a spring fork at that price point, which is awful, performancewise. I'm not getting into the why's and wherefores here because explaining these conclusions would take more time than anyone has here :) .

Its $999 and the page claims "free shipping to USA" so they can sell this bike for that price AND ship it and still make a profit? Bottom of the barrel parts is the only way that happens.

If you want a cheap bike from a USA seller, take a look at Lectric. they get a lot of good press and are arguably one of the biggest ebike sellers - possibly the biggest - here in the USA.
The Lectric 3.0 has nice specs and would fit.
 
I've listened rather well I believe, and i appreciate the info i've gained thus far, and on that note, any recommendations on seat height for a 28 inch standover height would be very welcome. As for listening, some said reliability is an issue, I decided to pay 50$ more for the same model and stick with amazon's reliability based on my large experience with them. Some said, the bikes are too big, so I measured my wife's step over, and reassessed the values of my spreadsheet with new entry's for seat post height and minimum rider height and then asked a followup question about seat height. Some said it would be very heavy, so I've been looking for exceptionally light models that meet my requirements. Thus far 56 pounds seems to be a very light weight for that class of Ebike, and it doesnt seem like they get a bunch lighter. I am all ears if you have any suggestions for a bike that falls within the size constraints and pricing constraints, full suspension or not, that I can buy on amazon or in person. While for my wife's bike I am more focused on full suspension, it might be nice to have a third bike that i can afford for guests, and there are some pretty cheap models around 500-1000 that seem to have decent specs if you don't want full suspension.
Aventon e bikes come in smaller sizes, Lectric e bikes would also fit. There are others. My daughter has an Lectric. They have good customer service and parts availability as does Aventon. Some bike shops sell Aventon. Both have hydrolic fork suspension, good brakes. Perhaps read some reviews on ebr web site. I would not buy a heavy bike or a bike with tires wider than 3 inches especially for a shorter lighter person. Make sure the battery has good range too. These bikes have good quality name brand batteries.
 
To be blunt, that bike looks like junk but its marketing team invested in a nice web site to hawk it.

Ignoring the spelling error (there are many throughout) ask yourself what "MSDS certified" is. A Material Safety Data Sheet has nothing to do with safety certification. They are just throwing acronyms out under the assumption that the layman is too ignorant to know any better. And if you've been around for awhile you will know there are countless bogus claims of safety certification for batteries. The fact they have thrown in MSDS for good measure just reinforces the fact that they are playing you.
This one's priceless, 'MSDS certified' huh? :)
M@ called the right things out here - are 'vendors' (using the term loosely b/c this is pretty sleazy) just making up non-certifications really someone to put any level of trust into (e.g. the bike will be as expected, safe, etc.) or just more sleaze to bring in more $ from the unknowing?
 
Hey there guys, I definitely appreciate what you have told me thus far. My wife is too small for most of the bikes on the list, she has a 28 inch standover height, what height does that translate into for optimal seat height? something like 30-32 inches? i know you should be able to touch your toes. Thusfar the only bikes she is likely to fit are the freesky rocky and the samebike polaris xd26 and i found a new one the aostirmotor S18 Mini. each fit a 5'1 rider, and have 30.3, 32.3, and 31.5 inch seat heights. but the XD26 is the lightest if she can manage a 32.3 inch seat. otherwise the freesky rocky seems to be the lowest seat height but adds another 10 lbs. The weight of the samebike is rather low for similar powered full suspension ebikes in its category it seems. Also, i dont mind getting something that isnt widely reviewed as long as i know what parts are on it, and i like the specs for all the equipment. I'm getting it though amazon, their return service on malfunctioning items is good enough for me to have confidence buying.
Just one more thing to consider - the weight posted maybe low because some manufacturers like to post weights without the battery. Add another ~10# or so if this is the case.
 
I'm sure the OP's long gone (did you buy one? How about a ride report?), but here's that awesome rear shock on the same ride - note the price.
 
Thanks for your replies everyone! Its actually 850 for the mechanical and 950 for the hydraulic brakes (both on sale). There seem to be four versions of the bike, two for the EU, and two for the US, the batteries you quoted are the EU model, which was on the advertising graphics. but here is the US model specs at the bottom of the page. https://samebikeus.com/products/samebike-polaris-h-black
48V 14Ah Lithium-ion
DMEGC 18650 2900mAh battery cells

as for electric, they definitely have their marketing team funded. I see them on every other few videos as a commercial on ebikes videos. But none have rear shocks, one of the requirements for what I'm looking for. I'll take lower quality shocks I can replace eventually over no shocks.

I was thinking that the mechanical brakes might be easier for me vs a bike shop to fix if i was picking between the two for 100$ less. any idea what that might cost to fix at a shop vs mechanical? Also I'm well aware under 2k is the cheap E-bike category, and cant compare them to stuff that costs 8K for a full suspension ready to go down a crazy mountain track. nor am I interested in hardtail options. Those two bike types isn't what we are looking for in terms of priorities. We want a comfortable ride, so full suspension, we would prefer a longer battery range for more options of use, Integrated battery for aesthetics requirement from my wife, and the lightest weight possible with hopefully a 750W ~80Nm hub drive. sadly she cant fit on the 1100$ and 1200$ models, those look to be the lowest price models that hit all the requirements. but at 850$ the 60Nm torque is looking pretty good. Just want something I can take my wife on easy trails while we explore and have some fun, and be as nice as possible to our backsides. I had considered that we may get some suspension seat posts and comfy cushioned seats in addition to the rear shocks. Most of these bikes in the under 2k full suspension category have very similar internals, and its just the frame that is different and the battery size, thus getting a frame you like with the biggest battery possible at the cheapest price seems to be the smart move if you don't wanna drop down a crazy hill.

No worries, I prefer peoples honest opinions as they graciously give me their time and try to help out. I am unlikely to ever be offended.

I have definitely heard the horror stories with poor support. but frankly with an appropriate bike frame and battery, I don't mind buying and replacing parts as needed to fix, mod and upgrade them. I caught the E-Bike bug after modding our kids remote control ride on cars with my brother and playing with those regularly. I figured us adults can have some electric powered fun too!
Im pretty sure I know where youre coming from and must agree with much of what youve written here. You and your wife arent die-hard, rough riding ebike users. You just want a bike for your wife that will be comfortable and allow her to get out and have pleasent rides with you. Youve correctly pointed out that a vast majority of ebike manufacturers use components from a relatively small list of component makers for things such as brakes, mechanical gears, and even suspension parts. This makes finding and replacing/upgrading a cheaper ebikes cheap components pretty easy. And that is IF you need to do so. You'd probly find some of the cheap, stock components serve you well, where as others might not. So youre thoughts about finding a bike with a frame that you(your wife) likes, along with a strong enough motor and large enough battery pack sounds perfectly reasonable to me. Naturally, ebike fanatics are going to push you toward the highest tech, most quality built, American made bike(or more likely, American assembled since such bikes use almost entirely Chinese components as well), but not all of us want(or can) pay the price such a bike costs nor are we all at that level of ebiking(and nor do many of us want to be).
Anyway, I too ride an Aniioki AQ177 and LOVE the range I get with its 60ah battery and my 165lb body weight. Of course its a "Chinese" bike from a new manufacturer BUT every component on it from the twist throttle to the brakes, to the gears and shifting mechanism is "generically" replaceable. The only proprietary item is admittedly the most expensive; the battery. So, in essence, the AQ177 has a practically bullet proof carbon steel frame that will last forever upon which is mounted all, very easy to find and replace components(except battery). And Im handy enough with electricity and battery packs to replace the lithium cells in the battery if ever required. Chances are though, by time my bike's battery pack begins to fail, we'll be using sodium Ion batteries, so even better. Considering how solid the Aniioki's frame is, I totally expect my great grand kids to be restoring and riding the bike many years from now lol! Seriously! The AQ177 may someday become a collectors item for the sole reason of having a frame that lasts almost forever.
Im not saying that your wife needs an AQ177. Just that I understand and support your views on the matter of prioritizing a solid frame, motor and sized battery that you can work with and go from there.
 
Im pretty sure I know where youre coming from and must agree with much of what youve written here. You and your wife arent die-hard, rough riding ebike users. You just want a bike for your wife that will be comfortable and allow her to get out and have pleasent rides with you. Youve correctly pointed out that a vast majority of ebike manufacturers use components from a relatively small list of component makers for things such as brakes, mechanical gears, and even suspension parts. This makes finding and replacing/upgrading a cheaper ebikes cheap components pretty easy. And that is IF you need to do so. You'd probly find some of the cheap, stock components serve you well, where as others might not. So youre thoughts about finding a bike with a frame that you(your wife) likes, along with a strong enough motor and large enough battery pack sounds perfectly reasonable to me. Naturally, ebike fanatics are going to push you toward the highest tech, most quality built, American made bike(or more likely, American assembled since such bikes use almost entirely Chinese components as well), but not all of us want(or can) pay the price such a bike costs nor are we all at that level of ebiking(and nor do many of us want to be).
Anyway, I too ride an Aniioki AQ177 and LOVE the range I get with its 60ah battery and my 165lb body weight. Of course its a "Chinese" bike from a new manufacturer BUT every component on it from the twist throttle to the brakes, to the gears and shifting mechanism is "generically" replaceable. The only proprietary item is admittedly the most expensive; the battery. So, in essence, the AQ177 has a practically bullet proof carbon steel frame that will last forever upon which is mounted all, very easy to find and replace components(except battery). And Im handy enough with electricity and battery packs to replace the lithium cells in the battery if ever required. Chances are though, by time my bike's battery pack begins to fail, we'll be using sodium Ion batteries, so even better. Considering how solid the Aniioki's frame is, I totally expect my great grand kids to be restoring and riding the bike many years from now lol! Seriously! The AQ177 may someday become a collectors item for the sole reason of having a frame that lasts almost forever.
Im not saying that your wife needs an AQ177. Just that I understand and support your views on the matter of prioritizing a solid frame, motor and sized battery that you can work with and go from there.
Yes, I know the OP is long gone. Just thought Id put in my 2 cents worth for the next guy/gal.
 
Just one more thing to consider - the weight posted maybe low because some manufacturers like to post weights without the battery. Add another ~10# or so if this is the case.
The weight listed for the Aniioki AQ177 at 112lbs is the actual combined weight of bike and battery.
 
I've listened rather well I believe, and i appreciate the info i've gained thus far, and on that note, any recommendations on seat height for a 28 inch standover height would be very welcome. As for listening, some said reliability is an issue, I decided to pay 50$ more for the same model and stick with amazon's reliability based on my large experience with them. Some said, the bikes are too big, so I measured my wife's step over, and reassessed the values of my spreadsheet with new entry's for seat post height and minimum rider height and then asked a followup question about seat height. Some said it would be very heavy, so I've been looking for exceptionally light models that meet my requirements. Thus far 56 pounds seems to be a very light weight for that class of Ebike, and it doesnt seem like they get a bunch lighter. I am all ears if you have any suggestions for a bike that falls within the size constraints and pricing constraints, full suspension or not, that I can buy on amazon or in person. While for my wife's bike I am more focused on full suspension, it might be nice to have a third bike that i can afford for guests, and there are some pretty cheap models around 500-1000 that seem to have decent specs if you don't want

Hey everyone, I’ve been doing some searching this last week for an E-bike, and I wanted to make sure it was full suspension, with the battery integrated into the frame. I tried to get the largest battery I could for the price since most of the 750W hub motors are nearly identical. I didn’t want to spend more than 1000-2000$ since I was going to buy one for my wife too. For those looking for similar bikes, here is a list so you don’t have to work as hard as I did when looking and comparing.

PriceEbikeBatteryMotor nmTire SizeBike WeightMax LoadFrame MaterialControllerMin Height
$900.00Samebike XD2614AH60 nm26x2.156 Lbs220 Lbs6061 Aluminum48V 22±1A 9MOSFET5’1
$1,100.00Scooway Hero15AH80 nm27.5x3.064 Lbs330 Lbs6061 Aluminum48V5’5
$1,200.00Reaspire Knight16AH85 nm26x4.066 Lbs300 Lbs6061 Aluminum48V 25A5’4
$1,400.00Freesky Rocky15AH85 nm20x4.075 Lbs300 Lbs6061 Aluminum48V 22A5’1
$1,500.00SMLRO V3 Plus Dual Motor22.4AH26x4.073 Lbs394 Lbs6061 Aluminum
$1,700.00ANIIOKI AQ177 Pro Max60AH80 nm20x4.0112 Lbs350 LbsCarbon Steel48V 25A
$1,990.00Accolmile Cola/Rocket Bear 1S MidDrive17.5AH120 nm29"66 Lbs300 Lbs6061 Aluminum48V


Since she only weighs 100~ pounds and 5’1-5’2 I wanted something lighter weight for her to be able to manage. I also figure since I got the aniioki 112 Lb bike + My 180 Lbs with 60AH my weight to AH ratio is about 5Lbs/1Ah (300/60) if i get her a 56 Lb bike + her 100 Lbs , then its roughly 160/14 which is 11.4lbs/1Ah so she should get little less than half my ridiculous range.

Any thoughts? I think I'm going to go with the 900$ Same bike XD26. It may have a lower power motor, but it's likely going to be adequate for her, not sure she will appreciate the 450$ extra jump for the next bike that accommodates her 5'1 height or the extra 19 pounds for the Freesky Rocky( the blue color is 50$ more, she wouldn’t want black), whereas the Samebike XD26 is white and matches the one I got.
Reading through replies to your inquiry, I see that there are just as many judgemental wanna-be elitists in this Ebike forum as in just about every other type of forum that Ive ever participated in. People who seem to believe that they are virtually gods of the topic being discussed and that anyone asking questions about that topic are to be talked down to as if they are complete idiots. And this silly arrogance is glaringly obvious from some of these folk right from their first response. I suppose the anonimous nature of the internet encourages such openly boorish attitudes. Thank goodness for the folk who are both knowledgeable in their areas AND decent folk to have a related discussion with. And thank goodness that there are always a few of those in every forum Ive participted in as well. If anyone reads this and wonders what the heck Im talking about, just go back and read all the posts in this thread prior to this post. Or go read the posts in almost any other longish thread in this(or most any) forum. You'll discover many very clear examples of what I described. Some responders sound so irritated that they would need to explain something to someone who asked a question, you have to wonder if they even understand that 1) Forums like this are created specifically for people to exchange ideas, seek advice and generally learn from each other 2) The person they are replying boorishly to almost surely could blow the boorish repliers out of the water concerning other topics(in other words, an extensive knowledgeable in Ebikes is much appreciated when politely shared BUT it certainly doesnt make the knowledge holder especially important). And 3) no one is forcing anyone to reply to any question. If one feels that a question is so far below the stratusfere of his intellect, he needs not upset himself by answering it. Of course not answering isnt an option for many such folk. If they dont reply, how else might they show their vast superiority in all things Ebike and his overwhelming distain for anyone who doesnt know as much about the topic as he does??? Sorry. I truly dont mean to offend. I just find it all kind of amusing ;)
 
The weight listed for the Aniioki AQ177 at 112lbs is the actual combined weight of bike and battery.
OMG, 112lbs?!?
IMO, it won't matter if you're treating the bike as more of a 'moped' but that is super-heavy for an e-bike in general.
A lot of the 'misc China generic bikes' that get re-branded by various vendors are at the ~80# mark or so with battery included, while the more expensive carbon frame eMTBs are ~50lbs or under (ballpark, this is before getting into the super lights).

I had a ~80lb fat tire bike before my ~50lb Lynx X2 (yeah, I do need to go weigh it recently, think was ~55 from Luna, but I built a lighter wheel set, some other bits), and the difference in 'feel' riding is pretty noticeable, although there are numerous things in play here - fat tire to much skinnier, much better suspension on the Luna (which I've also upgraded the rear shock to a DVO..), torque-sensing(Luna) vs cadence etc.

No judgement on trying to get into a 'cheap' (relatively speaking anyways) e-bike, but I bet a lot to most of us, short of those throwing big $ out of the gate, wound up replacing our 'first' with a more expensive (and lighter, and ... ) bike pretty quickly.

On perfectly flat roads, the heavy weight is much less noticeable, but start going up hills or off-road at all, and it becomes significantly more noticeable, not to mention if you wind up at some point doing a trip and using a vehicle mounted bike rack - I'm a fairly strong guy but the difference in grabbing my wife's Gazelle (~55#) or my X2 (~50#) vs the fat tire bike onto the rack is pretty noticeable, especially when you're trying to keep the front wheel straight to get the bike into the rack.

All of the bikes listed are hub motor, and also presumably cadence sensor only? If looking for 'moped-like' and less exercise, cadence sensing is ok, but not ideal for many who want to be able to get a level of exercise, plus they tend to feel pretty 'non-bike-like.'

The weight will also impact real range for the same battery size.

I haven't looked at 'the latest cheaper ebikes' in some time, but personally I'd look for whatever I could find with torque sensing, big battery, then weight as probably my ordered/ranked considerations. If you stick with it a while, you'll probably wind up 'upgrading' at some point or another but at least that's a decent-ish starting point for 'first ebike' IMO. It's also worth checking out FB marketplace, or pinkbinke classifieds - you may find someone else's 'first bike' (or second...) at a good cost savings.
 
Thanks for the reply and advice but not everyone shares your needs or desires in an "ebike". In fact, that was a very large part of the point I was trying to make in my initial reply to the long gone OP lol! The AQ177a is literally EXACTLY what I wanted and had been looking for. Ive now owned it for going on a month and havent been disappointed in the least. Furthermore, I havent encountered any of the issues you brought up concerning the AQ177s weight. I live in Northern Maine where roads are built up & over hills, not through them. With its 48v, 1000watt(not peak!) motor, my AQ177 powers over the many hills on my daily routes with only a little slow down near the tops(thats without me peddaling). As far as "true" range, that cant be predicted ahead of time for any ebike. There are just too many variables. What I DO KNOW though is that with 2880 watt hours, my AQ177 gets me everywhere and anywhere I "want and need" to go without causing me a single iota of range anxiety. Also, and again because my needs are different from yours, Ill never transport my AQ177 on a bicycle bumper hitch carrier. I purchased it to be my primary source of transportation. How can I get away with that? Consider that I bought my 2010 Jeep Patriot in 2013 when it had 20k miles on it. Now in 2023, ten years later, my jeep has just 50k miles on it. In other words, I rarely travel and when I do its close to home, doing errands locally. So a "moped" like Ebike suites me perfectly. Furthermore, if I ever did decide to hop in my motorhome and travel cross country, Id use a proper carrier such as one designed to hold dirt bikes or small motorcycle. Oh, and neither is the AQ177 my "first" Ebike. Its my second. My first I built about five or eight years ago? From a rear wheel kit and a light weight mountain bike that I purchased specifically to convert. It was(still is, actually!) a 36v system that works very well for what it is. Initially, I bought a 20ah battery pack for it and later built two additional 15+ah battery packs by myself(after some research and YouTube video watching). The much older 20ah pack has lost a bit of capacity but is still a good, reliable pack. Anyway, my 1st ebike met my needs for quite awhile but no longer does. Thus I sat down, decided what my new needs were and went shopping. The AQ177 seemed to meet all of my current needs so I bought it to discover that YES! It really does meet all of my current needs lol! Imagine that? Will I ever buy another Ebike? Dunno. Getting kinda old(ish). On the other hand, people buy new things all the time, right? So maybe-but I doubt it. You seem to be trying hard to convince me that your needs in an ebike should be mine, but that really isnt how it works. You're concerned that an Ebike like mine doesnt even "feel" like an ebike. That seems to be a drawback in your eyes. Not to me at all. I didnt want an Ebikey ebike. I wanted an electric moped and thats pretty much exactly what I got in my AQ177. Bottom line is that we all have different needs in an ebike(or a car, or a wife/husband, or whatever!!). You buy the ebike that suites your needs, and Ill buy one that suites my needs 😁
 
OMG, 112lbs?!?
IMO, it won't matter if you're treating the bike as more of a 'moped' but that is super-heavy for an e-bike in general.
A lot of the 'misc China generic bikes' that get re-branded by various vendors are at the ~80# mark or so with battery included, while the more expensive carbon frame eMTBs are ~50lbs or under (ballpark, this is before getting into the super lights).

I had a ~80lb fat tire bike before my ~50lb Lynx X2 (yeah, I do need to go weigh it recently, think was ~55 from Luna, but I built a lighter wheel set, some other bits), and the difference in 'feel' riding is pretty noticeable, although there are numerous things in play here - fat tire to much skinnier, much better suspension on the Luna (which I've also upgraded the rear shock to a DVO..), torque-sensing(Luna) vs cadence etc.

No judgement on trying to get into a 'cheap' (relatively speaking anyways) e-bike, but I bet a lot to most of us, short of those throwing big $ out of the gate, wound up replacing our 'first' with a more expensive (and lighter, and ... ) bike pretty quickly.

On perfectly flat roads, the heavy weight is much less noticeable, but start going up hills or off-road at all, and it becomes significantly more noticeable, not to mention if you wind up at some point doing a trip and using a vehicle mounted bike rack - I'm a fairly strong guy but the difference in grabbing my wife's Gazelle (~55#) or my X2 (~50#) vs the fat tire bike onto the rack is pretty noticeable, especially when you're trying to keep the front wheel straight to get the bike into the rack.

All of the bikes listed are hub motor, and also presumably cadence sensor only? If looking for 'moped-like' and less exercise, cadence sensing is ok, but not ideal for many who want to be able to get a level of exercise, plus they tend to feel pretty 'non-bike-like.'

The weight will also impact real range for the same battery size.

I haven't looked at 'the latest cheaper ebikes' in some time, but personally I'd look for whatever I could find with torque sensing, big battery, then weight as probably my ordered/ranked considerations. If you stick with it a while, you'll probably wind up 'upgrading' at some point or another but at least that's a decent-ish starting point for 'first ebike' IMO. It's also worth checking out FB marketplace, or pinkbinke classifieds - you may find someone else's 'first bike' (or second...) at a good cost savings.
 
Again, back to the point of us all having different needs; Im 60yrs old, my friend. Im in perty dang good shape for my age(or compared to most folk in this country who are half my age) but I dont go "off roading". Not interested in it in the least. In fact, the 1st thing I did to my AQ177 was put sealant in the inner tubes and change the stock knobbies to white wall, puncture resistant street tires. I use my "moped like ebike" like a "moped like ebike" lol! I do errands around the two towns I live near which includes grocery shopping and carrying my 30lb dog with me in a rear basket every where I go. And yes! When I previously stated that my AQ177 climbs hills great, that is with my dog on the back. Ive literally never ridden the bike without her. Another benefit that I enjoy from owning a "moped like ebike" is that I keep it charged entirely via solar power. I operate my entire household on solar but built a separate solar charging station specifically to keep my two ebikes charged without drawing off my primary system. Today was cloudy so I was mostly charging at just a couple amps per hour but on sunny days, my solar charger pushes between 6 and 10 amps an hour into my batteries for at least 4 to 5 hrs of the day. The wall socket charger that came with my original 36v ebike battery produces just 2amps anyway. The charger that came with my 48v AQ177 can push in up to 8amps. The picture below is of my 48v 60ah battery on the solar charger. Its a pretty boring pic. Doesnt show much but theres not much to show. Making a solar ebike charging station is very simple. Anyway, Im glad you have an ebike that meets your particular needs but im also glad that I have one that meets "my" particular needs. Take care!
 

 

Attachments

  • 20231012_131008.jpg
    20231012_131008.jpg
    261.7 KB · Views: 71
Like I said. Pretty boring pic. The two 24v 200 watt panels connected in parallel that power the charger are on the other side of the wall.
 
Back