SKS Speedrockers - A German Example of Ingenuity for Fenders/Mudguards

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Mazovia, Poland
SKS Germany is an ingenious brand that can conjure up fenders/mudguards for any type of bike from pieces of plastic, wire, rubber, and velcro.

I want to tell you about the product that would be appropriate for your Vado SL or Creo as long as the tyre width is up to 42 mm: SKS Speedrockers. The product consists of three plastic pieces:
  • Rear fender with a telescopic extension
  • Front fender
  • Front fender spoiler.
It comes with four rubber and one velcro straps for the rear and four velcro straps for the front. It also comes with ten rubber pieces to protect your bike frame against scratching. Necessary to mention the fenders are fully adjustable. The front fender involves a safety feature: should a twig get between a fender and the tyre, the supporting wires will snap from their sockets and unblock your wheel (the wires can be re-attached later).

The installation is extremely simple. The mudguards can be easily removed for dry weather or for washing. As long as you have tensioned the rubber and velcro straps, the mudguards stay on your bike solidly. And they do work in the mud or a violent rainfall with deep puddles! (Actually, Specialized could learn from SKS how to make Vado SL fenders properly... Why does the brand limit the tyre width at 38 mm for the EQ version remains a mystery for me.)

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SKS Speedrockers even look sporty!

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Positively tested during a heavy rainfall!
 
I've run a pair of these on my carbon road bike, which doesn't have any fender attachment points.
I found that they fit okay and do a good job of keeping the bike and rider relatively dry/clean, but they do need tweaking on a regular basis to keep the rubbing to a minimum.
Not the best fenders out there, but a decent solution for a bike without fender mounts.
 
I use the Speedrockers exclusively on a Creo. They get the job done in a pinch but as soon as the rain stops, they come off. I do appreciate how quickly the rears go on but the two-piece fronts can be a bit fiddly. That being said, as provisional full coverage fenders, they’re pretty good at what they do.
 
Hmm... Mine didn't go off after the rain 😊 My mates had told me 'Tighten them STRONGLY' 😊
 
It's amazing how much engineering has to go into something that appears so simple.
I've tried endless mudguards with various quick release and bolt on mechanisms, they've all failed, or rattled, or hit the tyre.
Maybe it's my riding style.
 
I too have found the Speedrockers to be very good. The only issue I’ve had is the top front fitting occasionally sliding down the fork a little resulting in tyre rub. Easily solved by putting a tight cable tie beneath it so it can’t slip.
 
It's amazing how much engineering has to go into something that appears so simple.
I've tried endless mudguards with various quick release and bolt on mechanisms, they've all failed, or rattled, or hit the tyre.
Maybe it's my riding style.
My brother has used SKS Blade on his 2.6" tyre MTB and he says these are ideal. Only I am not sure whether SKS makes anything for your tyre size.
 
Apologies Stefan for the off topic question but can you tell me what tires you are running with the smooth center tread?
 
My wife's Como 3 has the same tire. They are Specialized Pathfinder tires.
 

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SKS Germany is an ingenious brand that can conjure up fenders/mudguards for any type of bike from pieces of plastic, wire, rubber, and velcro.
Rear fender with a telescopic extension
The installation is extremely simple.
SKS Speedrockers even look sporty!
Yes, I concur Stefan. I've tried several fender products and nothing comes close to the SKS Fenders. I've had these fenders for almost two years and ride this bike really hard off road. They install easily, and stay put.
However, if you ride really, really hard, see below.


SKSFront.JPG
RearSKS.JPG


After a 2-3 months of hard riding I had to add a wooden triangular (red outline) shim beneath the OEM plastic rail mount. The OEM design had the tail end of the fender too close to the rear tire. Under extreme rear end bounce, the rear fender end would slap the tire very loudly, epecially if I added the extra weight of the rear end extension (installed above).

Then after about a year of hard riding, the rear mount cracked (yellow line), so I added the zip ties to solve that problem.

SKSMod.jpg



All in all, these are the best looking and performing fenders I've found. For non-mtb/enduro riders, no modifications like above will be needed.

~Tom
 

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Stefan it's worth putting protective tape on your seat tube where the rear mudguard snaps in place. It's the only non-rubberised part of the mudguard to come in contact with the frame I think and can in time rub away the paint there as it has on my Vado SL. But after 3 years full time use, that's the only downside I've found. Tyre sizes vary, I currently have 44mm WTB Byways on & they fit fine and are actually narrower then the 42mm Gravelkings SKs which I had on previously. I think the knobs make this tyre wider. Anyway both sizes fit fine. 50mm probably too wide.
 
I've been happy with my SKS oem fenders. They do become more brittle in sub-freezing temperatures.

This happened 2 winters ago on the first week of cold morning commutes. Held it together with gaffer's tape last winter. This year when the tape failed on the first cold day, I just finished the job and cut the fender shorter. Still does what I need it to

1000008043.png
 
Yes, I concur Stefan. I've tried several fender products and nothing comes close to the SKS Fenders. I've had these fenders for almost two years and ride this bike really hard off road. They install easily, and stay put.
However, if you ride really, really hard, see below.


View attachment 173000View attachment 173001

After a 2-3 months of hard riding I had to add a wooden triangular (red outline) shim beneath the OEM plastic rail mount. The OEM design had the tail end of the fender too close to the rear tire. Under extreme rear end bounce, the rear fender end would slap the tire very loudly, epecially if I added the extra weight of the rear end extension (installed above).

Then after about a year of hard riding, the rear mount cracked (yellow line), so I added the zip ties to solve that problem.

View attachment 173005


All in all, these are the best looking and performing fenders I've found. For non-mtb/enduro riders, no modifications like above will be needed.

~Tom
Tom, an interesting story! These, however, are not Speedrockers?
 
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