Keeping feet dry in the rain

ebikemom

Well-Known Member
Hi all!

Long time no "see!" I'm back to ebike commuting this Fall and rainy days are coming. I've never really found a good solution to keep my feet dry. My commute is 45 minutes long, so some raingear failure is inevitable, and I keep a change of clothes in my office for this reason. For footwear, I've tried "duck boots," but water gets in through the area where the lacings are. I've tried "spats" made to protect people from rain, but they aren't effective either. I'm reluctant to try a full rubber boot because they don't have much support for the foot, and when I bike in something flimsy on my feet for too long my feet cramp up. I do have a pair of rubber boots I can try though.

In the meantime, I wonder what your solutions are?

Thanks for your road-tested ideas, or non-road-tested brainstorms!
 
I use something like this when its bucketting down, but not that expensive. Should be able to find something cheaper.
With good waterproof trousers that covers them. May want taller boots if bike has crossbar as trousers will ride up as you get leg over. Not such an issue on stepthrough.

Tried overshoes with MTB shoes(semi waterproof), but still end up with damp feet in heavy rain. Light rain they work OK. Even in heavy rain not sodden so easy to dry overnite.

To dry shoes I use these

Or/and heated pet mat.

I always have dry cloths and shoes at work.
 
Rain pants over tall rubber equestrian boots? Not as clunky as typical rubber work boots.

Tall clunky electrician's boots were my faves for long walks in deep snow. Surprisingly warm, good arch support, no problem going for miles. Wasn't cycling then, but I can see biking in them.
 
Rain pants over tall rubber equestrian boots? Not as clunky as typical rubber work boots.

Tall clunky electrician's boots were my faves for long walks in deep snow. Surprisingly warm, good arch support, no problem going for miles. Wasn't cycling then, but I can see biking in them.
I use waterproof keen shoes and not too heavy rubber boots depending on how much rain I will have. I wear the keens all winter and use the rubber boots when it's raining.
 
I'm in the PNW too with a similar commute.

#1 rule as you and Trevor mentioned is to keep a dry set of clothes/shoes at work because you WILL need them at some point.

I don't like boots over the ankle and quickly realized that any low cut waterproof shoe option would disappoint if I expected to never have wet feet. What works for me are some Showers Pass waterproof socks usually paired with a pair of Merrell winter mocs. The winter mocs shed mist and sprinkles but will soak through in full rain after about 30 min. My feet have never gotten wet in the Showers Pass socks. I tried SealSkinz too but didn't like the fit and feel nearly as much.

@TrevorB 's link doesn't work for me, but I'm guessing its a standard shoe dryer. I bring a cheapo one to work in the winter to keep under the counter. Nice to start home with toasty dry shoes and gloves.
 
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Yeah, I'll need to dig out the snow gaiters that an ex assured me that I needed. Truth be told, I don't go out on the bike in a heavy rain. I just wait it out.
 
I too don't like riding in the rain.
This rainy season I ride k9will to work rain or shine.
When it rains here people drive super slow and takes longer to get to my workshop with my Tacoma which is 9 miles from home.
your rain is like taking shower. that actually makes it harder rain gear would make you cook like a microwave potato.
 
For wet and cold. Got them at DICKS Sporting Goods. Mine are fake fur lined. I've ridden my scooter in some wet and cold weather and they've always done great.
 

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I wear 510 shoes as they are very comfortable and wear waterproof / windproof socks.
IMG_2342.jpeg


Even if the shoes get wet these keep my feet dry and warm.

DG…
 
I wear 510 shoes as they are very comfortable and wear waterproof / windproof socks.
View attachment 163291

Even if the shoes get wet these keep my feet dry and warm.

DG…
Wool sox also stay warm when wet. Of all the proposed solutions to the OP's problem, sox with this property may be her best bet, cuz keeping her feet dry on a long wet commute sounds pretty hopeless.
 
Similar to what I use, color choice, well known PNW branding for cred at work and on sale!

 
I've had a problem with every "gaiter" style product I've tried, they don't effectively cover the tongue area enough to be water proof under heavy rain conditions. A longer area to cover the tongue is a good start (most don't even have this) but they also have to sit firmly against the shoe and that's difficult to do in windy conditions and when your foot is moving a lot.

I've found complete shoe covers work better and so far the best I've tried (roomy for different MTB shoes, waterproof, not too expensive, etc.) are these https://www.gripgrab.com/collection...everyday-shoe-covers-2?variant=40642768404641

Gripgab ships to North America relatively inexpensively, has good customer service and also appears to have a ton of other potentially useful foul weather gear, although I haven't tried anything other than the shoe covers ... yet.
 
Thanks for reminder rain season is coming here soon.
I ordered these and can't wait to field test them. I think will go well with my Froggtog light weight rainsuit.

How well are your Frogg Toggs holding up for you? My brother-in-law bought a pair and they didn't last.

(One good cough, belch, sneeze or fart and they are done for.)
 
Showers Pass socks are a good option.

Always remember that no amount of whiz bang gadgetry is going to keep you dry for hours in a serious rainstorm. I rode yesterday for six hours into the jaws of a serious bomb cyclone and was soaked to the skin. I’m still drying stuff out this morning.

Feet are generally waterproof and sometimes it is better to just put up with soggy feet and have dry socks and shoes waiting for you at the end of the ride.
 
Having commuted over many rainy winters:

I started off wearing Sealskinz, which at the time were essentially neoprene wet suit booties that were thin enough to put shoes over. Nowadays they are waterproof socks. But they are in the $50 range. I currently rotate between two pair of these:


Half the price of Sealskinz. I would stay away from any form of waterproof boot. Wear your regular cycling shoes. They can be as wet as can be and if your socks keep your feet dry, no reason to care.

I also wear wool socks on occasion which are almost as good. Your feet get wet but you don't care thanks to the wool not letting them get cold. My office garage has a heater in it and I can lay them over my handlebars and by the time the day is over they are pretty much dry.
 
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