Vado 4.0. Change seat post due to short legs.

Purpleparrotuk

New Member
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United Kingdom
I purchased the Step Through Vado 4.0 in a small frame a few weeks ago. I’m only 5ft 4 and I can only just put my tip toes on the floor. Due to the suspension seat post this can’t be changed. I would like to lower it by about an inch. Can anyone recommend another suspension seat post that I can get in the UK that will allow me to do this? Thanks
 
Hi Parrot,

It seems you intend to do a wrong thing.
I can only just put my tip toes on the floor.
An e-bike such as Vado has never been designed to plant your feet on the ground while seated. To get on a properly configured Vado, you need to put your foot on one of the pedals, kick off with the other foot to set your bike in motion, raise your body onto the saddle with the leg on the pedal, and then start pedalling. To get off the bike, you need to gracely put one of your feet forward (off the pedal), raise your body to leave the saddle, then brake, and then set the free foot on the ground.

You are trying to make your Vado a cruiser bike. If you do so, your knees will point up, making the pedalling totally inefficient and extremely tiresome after a short distance ridden!

Please visit this web page:

And have a look at the right hand side to find something similar to:
1718623527370.png

It is the Specialized Size Calculator. Once you have entered your body dimensions, the calculator will give you a good guess of the proper saddle height. The saddle height is measured from the top-centre of the saddle to the centre of the spindle at the crankset/motor.

Currently, you have a feeling your Vado is too tall. It isn't. It is just designed for another riding style than you thought!

A good video! (The technique I described is better for Step Through Frames).
 
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I purchased the Step Through Vado 4.0 in a small frame a few weeks ago. I’m only 5ft 4 and I can only just put my tip toes on the floor. Due to the suspension seat post this can’t be changed. I would like to lower it by about an inch. Can anyone recommend another suspension seat post that I can get in the UK that will allow me to do this? Thanks
Tip toes is good,, it will give you better leg extension, less fatigue if you ride more than 25 miles or so, I’m 5’6 with a medium Vado and my toes barely touch, do you have the seat post that came with it? It’s basically useless,I have the redshift seat post, it’s the smallest of the good seat posts it adds 3” to the height, you could buy a shorter post or cut a longer one.
 
I had a similar problem on my Levo. I couldn't get the seat low enough for a proper riding fit as the dropper post couldn't be lowered further without the activation lever being compressed. You might be able to get the seat post lower by doing what I did or have the LBS do it for you:
Remove the battery; loosen all the dropper post cable clamps and the seat post clamp; pull as much cable slack forward and out toward the handlebar lever until the seat post activation lever has near zero clearance within the frame; reassemble.
I was able to gain/lower the post about 3/4" which was more that I needed.
As others have said, get the proper seat post fitment / ergonomics for riding to protect your legs and get the most efficient pedaling effort. With having a step-thru you probably just need a little on/off riding technic adjustments. Good Luck!
 
Thanks for all the replies. Is it ok for the seat post to be as low down as it possibly goes? The manual says doing it wrong may damage the bike but then mentions markings on the post. I see the markings but there are none where the saddle stops at the lowest point. They are quite a bit further down so I would need to raise the post quite a bit to see them.
 
you should have the LBS that you bought it from properly fit the bike to your liking. I agree with that while on the seat you shouldn't be able to touch the ground but that is not for everyone's liking, so make the bike to fit how you like it and is comfortable for you to ride, maybe after a little time with the bike you feel more secure to move the seat post up a little. good luck,
 
Dropping the post to its minimum shouldn't hurt anything. I would leave ~1/4" between the dropper collar and the top of frame, since that piece isn't really supposed to be load bearing.

As others have noted, seatpost height is generally set by your pedaling position. Not being able to stand with your feet on the ground while sitting on the saddle is totally normal, though it is common for new riders to find it uncomfortable. Ideal pedaling position has your legs almost straight at the bottom of your pedal stroke because your legs are strongest that way. Try standing (off the bike) with your legs totally straight and then dip down 6" and straighten back up. Then do the same thing starting with your knees mostly folded and lifting yourself 6" from there. Much harder. Pedaling with the saddle too low is doing the second one instead of the first. You don't get as much leg power and it can be hard on joints like your knees.

That said, it does soemtimes sketch new riders out to not feel like they can put their feet on the ground while seated. Ultimately you should be comfortable on the bike.
 
you might consider running it as low as it goes for a while (agree with leaving a small gap!) and then raising it a few mm every week or two as you get comfortable with the bike, until you reach the more optimum position with nearly full leg extension at bottom of pedaling circle.

but no need to rush it, better to be confident first.
 
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