Specialized Tero 3.0 or Aventon Ramblas for “all purpose” e-bike?

ClydeRider4

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USA
I am looking to purchase my first “SUV” E-bike, and I wrote it down to the Tero 3.0 and Aventon Ramblas. I will not be doing much (if any) super aggressive single track type riding, frequently ride on off-road terrain such as hiking trails. However, I plan to ride on the road frequently with my new bike as well. I would estimate I will be “on-road” 60% of time, and “off-road” 40% of the time. From what I can tell, it seems the Ramblas will have nicer parts all around. However, I am concerned that the geometry might make it a bit uncomfortable/undesirable for some longer rides on pathed roads. I am trying to stay under $3000 if possible. Does anyone have experience and/or recommendations regarding these bikes (or others) for my purposes and price range?

Thank you very much in advance to anyone who is willing and able to help!
 
From the technology side, I had a chance to demo ride a Tero 3.0 soon after the premiere.

Tero e-bike review

No doubt the electronics is a very strong point of Specialized e-bikes. For instance, you can tune the motor performance as you ride (I have not heard of any other e-bike system that can do it). The connectivity is paramount. Interestingly, the 2.0E motor (found in Tero 3.0) is actually stronger than advertised (it is 68 Nm, not 50!) Specialized also has one of the best warranties in the world.

However, given a very good price, Tero 3.0 has some limitations:
  • The 530 Wh battery is not very big as for today's standards for premium e-bikes. Consider if you are ready to tune the motor down for a great range.
  • The suspension fork is Suntour XCM32, which is not really bad (and certainly hardly needs any maintenance). The weak point of this fork is it is very heavy.
  • As Tero is a hardtail e-MTB, it is equipped with a 36T chainring that cannot be replaced with a bigger one. That will reduce your achievable road speed
  • The tyres provided with Tero are proper off-road ones. For a person spending as much as 60% riding time on-road, the tyre noise might become tiring :)
I know only as much of Aventon Ramblas as written in the website specs. Yes, a bigger battery. No, the motor make is not disclosed. As I can see Ramblas is Class 1 while I think the Tero is now Class 3?

It is all down to the local support, repairs, and the strength of the warranty.

P.S. I do understand your budget but as the Tero 5.0, which is absolutely superior is on sale in the U.S. for $3,999 you could perhaps think of that model? You spend the money once but enjoy your rides for years.
 
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Stefan, what’s your source on the torque of the Tero 3? Interestingly I tried one yesterday while out gettting a new wheel for my Creo at the LBS, and I have to say it felt stronger than I would have expected given that 50Nm reference. I was quite impressed… if you could put an 11-42 on there, it might be something well worth having.
 
Stefan, what’s your source on the torque of the Tero 3? Interestingly I tried one yesterday while out gettting a new wheel for my Creo at the LBS, and I have to say it felt stronger than I would have expected given that 50Nm reference. I was quite impressed… if you could put an 11-42 on there, it might be something well worth having.
You get the peak power figure from the Support page... support.specialized.com
type Motors. You will find the Peak Motor Power under Motor Capabilities.

Divide the Peak Power by 6.28 and you will get the actual max motor torque (all honest manufacturers use 60 rpm or 6.28 rad/s as the reference). For instance, the SL 1.1 motor has the Peak Power (mechanical!) of 240 W, so the actual max torque is 38 Nm.
 
Thank you, sir! I know all about the limited power on the 1.1 motor on my Creo. Surprised they quote an artificially low number for the Tero 3. It certainly felt pretty lively to me, not unlike my (former) Toughroad, which I believe was reported at either 80 or 85Nm. Certainly more than I expected.

Good luck with this mountain climbing operation of yours this weekend, get out there and get ready!
 
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Divide the Peak Power by 6.28 and you will get the actual max motor torque (all honest manufacturers use 60 rpm or 6.28 rad/s as the reference). For instance, the SL 1.1 motor has the Peak Power (mechanical!) of 240 W, so the actual max torque is 38 Nm.

there's no engineering reason this has to be true, we know that the torque "curve" of an electric motor can be almost anything the controller dictates as long as it's within the limits of heat generation and other bits of the electrical system. there are constant torque electric motors, there are the normal kind which decline from a very high value near 0rpm to nothing at some very high rpm, and the electronics of the controller could limit you to anything under that line. i have to imagine the electronics of a well-designed system like bosch or specialized/brose/mahle are rarely running flat out, and it's entirely possible the quoted torque figures are not at 60rpm. no dishonesty there unless it's quoted at a value which does not correspond to actual riding of the bicycle :)
 
there's no engineering reason this has to be true, we know that the torque "curve" of an electric motor can be almost anything the controller dictates as long as it's within the limits of heat generation and other bits of the electrical system. there are constant torque electric motors, there are the normal kind which decline from a very high value near 0rpm to nothing at some very high rpm, and the electronics of the controller could limit you to anything under that line. i have to imagine the electronics of a well-designed system like bosch or specialized/brose/mahle are rarely running flat out, and it's entirely possible the quoted torque figures are not at 60rpm. no dishonesty there unless it's quoted at a value which does not correspond to actual riding of the bicycle :)
Like it or not but the e-bike manufacturers work to a standard. Isn't it funny the 2.2 or SL 1.1motor are so close to the rated torque when you do the simple recalc at 6.28 rad/s? It is no surprise to me 1.2, 1.2s and Yamaha PW-X2 are all so close to 85 Nm (peak power of 520 W) while Specialized has tried advertising the 1.2s at 90 Nm in the past? (Now Specialized gives 85 Nm more properly for 1.2 and 1.2s).

The motor torque values are marketing values for "torque wars". How come three subsequent motors could be at exactly 50, 70 and 90 Nm torque values when their peak power is 430, 470, or 565 W? Does Specialized use another rpm for reference for each motor model? :D

Come on... Even you do not believe that!

Take this: What is the incentive to buy a Vado 4.0 if the motor is only 75 Nm but the Vado 3.0 has 68 Nm? The bigger battery on Vado 4.0.
 
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