Replace 36 v battery by a 48v

Houbayida

New Member
Region
Europe
Hi, I would like to change the 36v battery on my scooter with a 48v one.
My controller has a voltage of 63v. Do you think it's good?
 
Why. Risk burning your motor out unless you know for sure its rated for 48v, should be printed on it.
 
I'm not sure, in any case the display and the controller work with 48v obviously, there is no reason why the motor should not work. At worst it will run faster
 
It may run faster but it will likely shorten its lifespan.
 
I'm not sure, in any case the display and the controller work with 48v obviously, there is no reason why the motor should not work. At worst it will run faster
Making controller and display work across a wide range of voltages is cheap. Motors are different and their power output is maximised for running voltage. A 48V motor run at 36V will be less powerful, more expensive and heavier. Can't see why manufacturer would fit one to 36V bike.
 
The motor will operate at 48 volts. It may get hotter faster, which can create other issues. The bigger question is “Can the controller?”. You might want to check the capacitors of the controller. You mentioned 63 volts. In that case, a 48v will work. However, you’ll loose the low voltage cutoff feature, if the controller. LVC for a 36v controller is usually 30v. LVC for a 48 volt controller it is 40v. You wouldn’t want your 48v battery to be discharged to anything under 40v. With the 30v LVC of the current controller, you’d be relying on the LVC of the battery BMS. Hopefully the battery has a BMS. On the other side, max voltage for a 36v battery is about 42v. The max voltage for a 48v battery is around 54 volts. This means, having a higher voltage battery, you may induce an “Overcharge” error. So you’d have to play the game where you keep the 48 under 42v to avoid that situation. Very bad idea for a 48v battery. It will have a short life, and could be very dangerous.

If you want to use a 48v battery, it would be best to install a 48v controller/display combo. Be sure to get the controller and display as a bundle. They will be more likely to work with each other. Just know that if you go this route, you’ll be rewiring a few things at the controller, You are super lucky if you get anything plug and play. Truthfully, in the ebike world, not much is plug and play.
 
Slaphappy covered all the tech issues. Little to add.

Let's see, a full charged 36V battery is 42V, which is right at the low voltage cutoff for a 48V battery. One downside is you will have no idea of your battery level, unless your display is dual voltage or shows voltage, While LVC for a 36V controller is 30-32V, your battery BMS will shut off well before this happens. While it still protects the battery, iI would rather not routinely run a battery til its LVC circuits trigger. Leads to unbalanced cells or shorter cell life.

Most of my bike controllers are dual voltage, so I find it convenient to mix batteries. You use lower current with higher voltage, and on a brushless motor, that's less heat in the connectors, wires, and motor provided you don't go nuts. If your bike doesn't have speed limiters, you typically get a 20% more speed boost at 48V over 36V. I never ride at max speed though.
 
Slaphappy covered all the tech issues. Little to add.

Let's see, a full charged 36V battery is 42V, which is right at the low voltage cutoff for a 48V battery. One downside is you will have no idea of your battery level, unless your display is dual voltage or shows voltage, While LVC for a 36V controller is 30-32V, your battery BMS will shut off well before this happens. While it still protects the battery, iI would rather not routinely run a battery til its LVC circuits trigger. Leads to unbalanced cells or shorter cell life.

Most of my bike controllers are dual voltage, so I find it convenient to mix batteries. You use lower current with higher voltage, and on a brushless motor, that's less heat in the connectors, wires, and motor provided you don't go nuts. If your bike doesn't have speed limiters, you typically get a 20% more speed boost at 48V over 36V. I never ride at max speed though.
ok if I summarize:
- if I drive too quickly, I risk damaging the engine
- I won't know when my battery is discharged
- I risk damaging my battery
 
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