Known Issues & Problems with Juiced Bikes Products + Help, Solutions & Fixes

If you say so, my slide rule is stuck. As an ebike I think it's great for what it is, but as a bike without power it's not much
of a pedaler. I'm in the process, experimentally, of adding a triple chainring, 50/40/26. I've been delayed by hardware issues.
My gas bike pedals well with the belt disengaged, (46/36/26,) but I'm uncertain as to what chain issues might arise. I'd really like
a bike that is reasonably useful without power.
 
If you say so, my slide rule is stuck. As an ebike I think it's great for what it is, but as a bike without power it's not much
of a pedaler. I'm in the process, experimentally, of adding a triple chainring, 50/40/26. I've been delayed by hardware issues.
My gas bike pedals well with the belt disengaged, (46/36/26,) but I'm uncertain as to what chain issues might arise. I'd really like
a bike that is reasonably useful without power.
Hub motors have to much resistance, I don't think the triple chain ring will do much better. Probably be better with front wheel drive.
 
I agree, I was only planning to use the other two rings for pedaling with power off. If I can dawdle along a flat at 10 or 12 mph,
so much the better to extend overall range.
 
I agree, I was only planning to use the other two rings for pedaling with power off. If I can dawdle along a flat at 10 or 12 mph,
so much the better to extend overall range.

I changed my front chainring to a 44T and it's not terrible to pedal without power.
 
One can also put the CCS in "eco" power conservation mode as that is its lowest pedal assistance mode to help extend ones overall lithium ion battery pack range; I believe in "eco" mode if one puts in about 30 watts of cycling power on ones pedals; the CCS electric hub motor matches that with about 70 watts of cycling power; if one cycling at no faster than at a 10mph pace the electric hub motor power consumption is only about at a rate of as low as 6watt hours per mile in eco mode on flat ground;

now since the 12.8ah lithium ion battery is rated at 48V which equals 614watt hours available minus 20% of the total 12.8ah lithium ion battery capacity(614watt hours times 0.20 equals 123watt hours) so that its cycle life is optimized and maximized for its fully rated 300 recharge cycles;

which equals about 614watt hours minus 123watt hours(20%) equals 491watt hours of total effective working lithium ion battery pack capacity; 491watt hours divided by 6watt hours per mile equals about 81 miles of lithium ion battery pack range if one stays in "eco" mode for the entire duration; for maximum optimum energy conservation of ones watt hours energy to extend ones lithium ion battery pack range by using ones pedaling input power on ones pedals;

now in the case of working with a 17ah lithium ion battery pack then 17ah times 48v equals 816watt hours; 816watt hours times 0.20 equals 163watt hours; 816watt hours minus 163watt hours equals 653watt hours of total effective working lithium ion battery pack capacity; 653watt hours divided by 6watt hours per mile equals about 108 miles of lithium ion battery pack range if one stays in "eco" mode for the entire duration; for maximum optimum energy conservation of ones watt hours energy to extend ones lithium ion battery pack range by using ones pedaling input power on ones pedals;

now in the final case of working with a 21ah lithium ion battery pack then 21ah times 48V equals 1008watt hours; 1008watt hours times 0.20 equals 201watt hours; 1008watt hours minus 201watt hours equals 807watt hours of total effective working lithium ion battery pack capacity; 807watt hours divided by 6watt hours per mile equals about 134 miles of lithium ion battery pack range if one stays in "eco" mode for the entire duration; for maximum optimum energy conservation of ones watt hours energy to extend ones lithium ion battery pack range by using ones pedaling input power on ones pedals;

one can now generally optimally select to extend ones lithium ion battery pack range if one is willing to stay in "eco" mode for the entire time with the following interesting summary choices provided below for consideration and review:

12.8ah lithium ion battery pack with up to 81miles "eco" mode range; at a 10mph pace that is about 8 hours of continuous electric bike pedaling;

17.0ah lithium ion battery pack(+$300 more over 12.8ah battery pack) with up to 108miles "eco" mode range; at a 10mph pace that is about 10 hours of continuous electric bike pedaling;

21.0ah lithium ion battery pack(+400 more over 17.0ah battery pack) with up to 134miles "eco" mode range; at a 10mph pace that is about 13 hours of continuous electric bike pedaling.

Eco mode can be best described as allowing ones CCS urban hybrid street bike to be pedaled as if it was a lightweight and efficient road racing bike; by giving it just enough additional watt hour pedal assistance to counteract, compensate and neutralize the fact that the bike is a bit heavier in weight and has heavier wheels and tires.

*the above assumptions are made from Juiced Bikes own provided supposedly unbiased test specifications data that they claim that they made on their custome test loop course; I would naturally conduct my own independent CCS electric bike trial field test results at a given known course such as the perimeter of Central Park Loop which is six miles in length filled with much more realistic three to four percent grade hills in midtown Manhatten; and see what the actual "real world" field test result figures come out to be; now if one is happy with them keep the CCS bike and if one is not happy with them; then return the CCS bike in the stated seven days risk free trial CCS electric bike time period at no cost to the potential Juiced Bike customer.
If your going to ride in eco mode all the time why not save your money and ride a regular bicycle J.S. it would probably be easier to ride with no resistance at all.
 
I changed my front chainring to a 44T and it's not terrible to pedal without power.
I'm glad to hear better powerless pedal is possible. But I'd still like to keep at least 50T for running powered. I use eco mode as much as is
practical, but 3 & S modes are great for getting a run at a hill. It was a real struggle getting over the hills I can now zoom right up*. My reason for
improving unpowered pedaling is that I want go places where the distance between charging opportunities exceeds my battery range. With a 26T ring I can still get a better than 2 to 1 ratio with
more leverage on the pedals.
*Weight loss has also helped a good deal.
 
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If your going to ride in eco mode all the time why not save your money and ride a regular bicycle J.S. it would probably be easier to ride with no resistance at all.

I have both types of bikes. But I can still do about 20mph in eco mode. Honestly the motor has brought the excitement back into riding for me that I had somewhat lost riding a regular road bike.
 
I'm glad to hear better powerless pedal is possible. But I'd still like to keep at least 50T for running powered. I use eco mode as much as is
practical, but 3 & S modes are great for getting a run at a hill. It was a real struggle getting over the hills I can now zoom right up*. My reason for
improving unpowered pedaling is that I want go places where the distance between charging opportunities exceeds my battery range. With a 26T ring I can still get a better than 2 to 1 ratio with
more leverage on the pedals.
*Weight loss has also helped a good deal.

I picked the 44T to be a good middle ground for me to run powered or unpowered depending on preference. If you look at my chart you can hit the hills pretty well in lowest gear and still do ~30 mph in top gear at 90rpm which is easy under power and about all the speed this bike can get under any configuration.

IMG_2744.jpg
 
I changed my mind about putting a 50/40/26 on the CCS. Instead it's going on my gas bike which was a fair beach bike with 2.1 tires.
it now will have 2.5s & an additional 3 mph to 36mph. With a *Tanaka 2.2 hp( 1650 watts) it has plenty of off-road power & I just saved the $2800 I
thought about spending on a hyperfat. Had I been able to order one sooner, I would have.
Instead, I'm going to start by putting a 50/34 compact on the CCS & see how that does.

*Far more reliable than the cheap chain drive kit engines, EPA & CARB approved & as clean as any 4 stroke, 7 yr warranty. (awfully noisy though)
 
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I picked the 44T to be a good middle ground for me to run powered or unpowered depending on preference. If you look at my chart you can hit the hills pretty well in lowest gear and still do ~30 mph in top gear at 90rpm which is easy under power and about all the speed this bike can get under any configuration.

View attachment 18966
Sounds viable, 50 pounds ago I was able to pedal the gasser to 33 mph on a *46T., 90 cadence; not too bad for a fat old man. Couldn't keep it up for long:) *26" whls.
 
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Sounds viable, 50 pounds ago I was able to pedal the gasser to 33 mph on a 46T., 90 cadence; not too bad for a fat old man. Couldn't keep it up for long:)

lol you got me beat then. No way I could get the CCS going 30mph without power even on that 44T.
 
If your going to ride in eco mode all the time why not save your money and ride a regular bicycle J.S. it would probably be easier to ride with no resistance at all.

I also ride 2 very good vintage road bikes, but they still couldn't keep up with me in eco mode, Rooster.
I'm not limited to one kind of bike. Be it gas, electric,or pure pedal, they all share an interest in
making the road safer for bicycles, and cleaner than cars.
 
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lol you got me beat then. No way I could get the CCS going 30mph without power even on that 44T.
No way I can pedal the CCS to 30 mph on a 52T under power unless I'm going downhill.
 

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I've ridden my CCS with the 17.4 Ah battery/default tires around 700 miles now, almost all commuting 28.8 mi round trip (1h35m riding time) along 80% beach path/protected bike path and 20% paved roads with no recharge from work. Observations.

Good:
  • My coworkers are still amazed that I commute 4 out of 5 days a week such a distance on a bike.
  • Overall feeling of the bike is very solid and controllable. My wife who is not very confident on bikes in general was able to ride a mile at 18 MPH with confidence, probably due to the increased weight and low center of mass of the bike.
  • About half a mile of my commute is along a 40 MPH speed limit car street with a couple stop lights. At assist level 3/S with some effort or if I unlock the top speed, I'm able to cruise at 30 MPH which is high enough that car traffic hasn't gotten annoyed at yet for taking a lane.
  • When I'm tired riding home, I just go ahead and turn on the cruise control on the bike at a low speed (15-18 MPH) for a couple miles to relax.
  • It rained on Thursday and the fenders did a good job of keeping the water/dirt off of me.
  • Being on the beach path/protected bike lanes for most of my ride is a great commute, because a) it's really pretty and b) there are few enough other riders/pedestrians so I can wear headphones and listen to music, which wasn't the case on my previous city street bike commute. Also, very few people ride the beach path after 8:30PM, probably due to lack of power/lights, so I can take my time and just relax. Occasionally I see some wildlife!
Neutral:
  • In assist, I'm probably at 15% eco, 35% level 1, 35% level 2, 8% level 3, 7% level S usage.
  • I'm averaging somewhere between 15-20 Wh/mi depending on how eco I go (~19 MPH for the 15 Wh/mi, ~24 MPH for the 20 Wh/mi). If I'm using 80% of my pack at 20 Wh/mi, my theoretical range is 33 mi or so.
  • I think I need a bike fitting, as my hands sometimes cramp up and I sometimes lose sensation in my nether regions for a while after riding. I'm wearing gloves/bike shorts, so it must be my riding position or something.
  • I'm pumping the tires up about once a week to 60 psi. They're only probably losing 3-4 psi per week so I could probably wait longer. No flats so far!
Bad:
  • Range anxiety is real. Problem with the 33 mi range is that I have some steep hills at the end of my ride home so I like to save some voltage for them. Higher voltage = better: at 700 watts on these hills, I'm huffing and puffing at 8 MPH, but at 900 watts, it's smooth sailing at 10 MPH. I also didn't realize that I often go out with coworkers after work so I put in an order with Juiced for an extra charger for work so I can roll to whatever restaurant/house we're going to instead of taking Lyft. Unfortunately they're sold out of regular chargers but customer service was able to place a special order for me.
  • Out of the box the front disk brake needed adjustment as did the derailleur. I've also got some unevenly pitched motor sound that happens about 50% of the time that I engage the motor. Not sure what's going on there.
  • At about 500 mi, I started getting front disk brake squeal (very loud) that comes and goes and some play in the chain (I think I need to regrease it).
  • It's unfortunate that the electric motor has to be turned on in order for you to use the front light of the bike. I know Tora said that he'd rather people always use the electric assist of the bike because otherwise it feels like a heavy bike, but if this is your only vehicle and you're trying to eke out some extra battery life for a later event (hills, event later that day), it's unsafe to ride with the bike off at night as you can't use the front light. Please add a "Mode 0" to the bike, even if it's disabled by default (have to turn it on in the options)!
Overall I'm very happy with the bike. I would've put about $375 into my car (at IRS rates) plus $144 of parking at this point, so the bike is about 25% done paying for itself, excluding the exercise I'm getting :).

If I were building a future perfect commuter bike for myself, I would use a totally internally geared + protected chain system to reduce the maintenance burden of the bike. If I could somehow protect the brakes too, that would be ideal.
 
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Hey mal,
I posted a while ago in another thread but if you want a spare charger quick I have the stock CCS charger that I've never used because I have the Grin charger. I offered to anyone on here that I'll sell mine for $50 shipped 2-day FedEx.

It's this one:

(Link Removed - No Longer Exists)
 
I've ridden my CCS with the 17.4 Ah battery/default tires around 700 miles now, almost all commuting 28.8 mi round trip (1h35m riding time) along 80% beach path/protected bike path and 20% paved roads with no recharge from work. Observations.

Good:
  • My coworkers are still amazed that I commute 4 out of 5 days a week such a distance on a bike.
  • Overall feeling of the bike is very solid and controllable. My wife who is not very confident on bikes in general was able to ride a mile at 18 MPH with confidence, probably due to the increased weight and low center of mass of the bike.
  • About half a mile of my commute is along a 40 MPH speed limit car street with a couple stop lights. At assist level 3/S with some effort or if I unlock the top speed, I'm able to cruise at 30 MPH which is high enough that car traffic hasn't gotten annoyed at yet for taking a lane.
  • When I'm tired riding home, I just go ahead and turn on the cruise control on the bike at a low speed (15-18 MPH) for a couple miles to relax.
  • It rained on Thursday and the fenders did a good job of keeping the water/dirt off of me.
  • Being on the beach path/protected bike lanes for most of my ride is a great commute, because a) it's really pretty and b) there are few enough other riders/pedestrians so I can wear headphones and listen to music, which wasn't the case on my previous city street bike commute. Also, very few people ride the beach path after 8:30PM, probably due to lack of power/lights, so I can take my time and just relax. Occasionally I see some wildlife!
Neutral:
  • In assist, I'm probably at 15% eco, 35% level 1, 35% level 2, 8% level 3, 7% level S usage.
  • I'm averaging somewhere between 15-20 Wh/mi depending on how eco I go (~19 MPH for the 15 Wh/mi, ~24 MPH for the 20 Wh/mi). If I'm using 80% of my pack at 20 Wh/mi, my theoretical range is 33 mi or so.
  • I think I need a bike fitting, as my hands sometimes cramp up and I sometimes lose sensation in my nether regions for a while after riding. I'm wearing gloves/bike shorts, so it must be my riding position or something.
  • I'm pumping the tires up about once a week to 60 psi. They're only probably losing 3-4 psi per week so I could probably wait longer. No flats so far!
Bad:
  • Range anxiety is real. Problem with the 33 mi range is that I have some steep hills at the end of my ride home so I like to save some voltage for them. Higher voltage = better: at 700 watts on these hills, I'm huffing and puffing at 8 MPH, but at 900 watts, it's smooth sailing at 10 MPH. I also didn't realize that I often go out with coworkers after work so I put in an order with Juiced for an extra charger for work so I can roll to whatever restaurant/house we're going to instead of taking Lyft. Unfortunately they're sold out of regular chargers but customer service was able to place a special order for me.
  • Out of the box the front disk brake needed adjustment as did the derailleur. I've also got some unevenly pitched motor sound that happens about 50% of the time that I engage the motor. Not sure what's going on there.
  • At about 500 mi, I started getting front disk brake squeal (very loud) that comes and goes and some play in the chain (I think I need to regrease it).
  • It's unfortunate that the electric motor has to be turned on in order for you to use the front light of the bike. I know Tora said that he'd rather people always use the electric assist of the bike because otherwise it feels like a heavy bike, but if this is your only vehicle and you're trying to eke out some extra battery life for a later event (hills, event later that day), it's unsafe to ride with the bike off at night as you can't use the front light. Please add a "Mode 0" to the bike, even if it's disabled by default (have to turn it on in the options)!
Overall I'm very happy with the bike. I would've put about $375 into my car (at IRS rates) plus $144 of parking at this point, so the bike is about 25% done paying for itself, excluding the exercise I'm getting :).

If I were building a future perfect commuter bike for myself, I would use a totally internally geared + protected chain system to reduce the maintenance burden of the bike. If I could somehow protect the brakes too, that would be ideal.

Thanks for taking the time and effort to reply and respond with useful CCS user feedback in particular; the feeling of sure footedness is largely primarily due to the somewhat unusual choice for bike frame geometry for the rear chainstays; its length is much shorter than average for a typical bike but that results in a very responsive and solid stable sure footed tracking bike; which feels very good while one is biking in unusual or new biking situations; its also good to hear that this CCS bike is particularly good for kicking back at the end of a long workday once one has set up cruise control at a conservative safe 12mph or so and plugged in some spotify mood lifting music to relax to on the way home without paying to much attention to the road while biking except relaxing and letting the cares of the work day ebb away;

its good to get back some "in the field" reports on actual battery capacity while in use; if one typically rides with 17ah lithium ion battery capacity at pedelac assist level 3 one can expect to get about a maximum mileage of about thirty five miles; which is I guess is a much more realistic evaluation to keep in mind if one is using the CCS to go on longer weekend bicycle touring jaunts; it might actually be worth it to prudently get a spare seventeen amp hour lithium ion battery for the trip back home; in order so that one is not unexpectedly stranded or have a very long bicycle ride home using only pedal power; since it would seem ones lithium ion battery does not actually last that long at all at 15mph one cannot expect it to last much more than about two hours biking going towards one destination; so one would definitely need a spare lithium ion battery pack to take one back home;

though the seventeen amp hour lithium ion batteries are a bit on the expensive side at $1,000 apiece; one that the CCS bike comes with if one upgrades to 17ah lithium ion battery from 12.8ah lithium ion battery capacity for an extra $300; the second spare 17ah lithium ion battery would cost a $1,000; so that would be about; $2,000 total combined for two 17ah lithium ion battery pack for 34ah total lithium ion battery pack capacity; the CCS bike itself costs about $700 with about an additional $300 for the total combined package of torque sensor, hydraulic disk brake upgrade, two bike fenders, powerful led headlight; for about $1,000 for the CCS bike itself without any exclusive without any lithium ion batteries at all; though its not a bad cost breakout as far as electric bikes cost breakdown goes; its just about average and nothing to write home about in reality at the end of the day;

now on the unevenly pitched motor sound that happens about 50% of the time that I engage the motor; that is very likely to be coming from the internals of the gear hub motor itself; typically the internal gear hub motor comes packed very lightly with lubricating white lithium grease that is rather easily flung off due to the massive typical speeds of the internal gearing found inside such typical electric hub motors; its quite easy to take apart the electric hub motor and pack it full with the high viscosity red color dyed heavy duty heat and moisture resistant rated molybdenum grease which is highly resistant to be flung off at any speed; now afterwards one should not hear any noise at all coming from the electric hub motor once it has been fully packed out with the red molybdenum grease packing;

but otherwise I am very glad to hear you are putting the CCS bike to good use with the daily racking up the cycling mileage and getting in some decent cycling mileage totals enjoying the CCS e-biking experiences and sharing that with those who were wondering what it was and/or might be like to own one for themselves; and then trying to decide if it is worth it ultimately for ones given e-biking application scenario; as their are an almost bewildering array of quite ponderous amount of good choices out their in the e-biking community to consider and weigh to see if one is going to actually get the amount of use out of it that they expect their e-bike to provide them in their expected scope and range of enjoyment that their e-biking experiences will hopefully provide them over the longer term use application.
 
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I've ridden my CCS with the 17.4 Ah battery/default tires around 700 miles now, almost all commuting 28.8 mi round trip (1h35m riding time) along 80% beach path/protected bike path and 20% paved roads with no recharge from work. Observations.

Good:
  • My coworkers are still amazed that I commute 4 out of 5 days a week such a distance on a bike.
  • Overall feeling of the bike is very solid and controllable. My wife who is not very confident on bikes in general was able to ride a mile at 18 MPH with confidence, probably due to the increased weight and low center of mass of the bike.
  • About half a mile of my commute is along a 40 MPH speed limit car street with a couple stop lights. At assist level 3/S with some effort or if I unlock the top speed, I'm able to cruise at 30 MPH which is high enough that car traffic hasn't gotten annoyed at yet for taking a lane.
  • When I'm tired riding home, I just go ahead and turn on the cruise control on the bike at a low speed (15-18 MPH) for a couple miles to relax.
  • It rained on Thursday and the fenders did a good job of keeping the water/dirt off of me.
  • Being on the beach path/protected bike lanes for most of my ride is a great commute, because a) it's really pretty and b) there are few enough other riders/pedestrians so I can wear headphones and listen to music, which wasn't the case on my previous city street bike commute. Also, very few people ride the beach path after 8:30PM, probably due to lack of power/lights, so I can take my time and just relax. Occasionally I see some wildlife!
Neutral:
  • In assist, I'm probably at 15% eco, 35% level 1, 35% level 2, 8% level 3, 7% level S usage.
  • I'm averaging somewhere between 15-20 Wh/mi depending on how eco I go (~19 MPH for the 15 Wh/mi, ~24 MPH for the 20 Wh/mi). If I'm using 80% of my pack at 20 Wh/mi, my theoretical range is 33 mi or so.
  • I think I need a bike fitting, as my hands sometimes cramp up and I sometimes lose sensation in my nether regions for a while after riding. I'm wearing gloves/bike shorts, so it must be my riding position or something.
  • I'm pumping the tires up about once a week to 60 psi. They're only probably losing 3-4 psi per week so I could probably wait longer. No flats so far!
Bad:
  • Range anxiety is real. Problem with the 33 mi range is that I have some steep hills at the end of my ride home so I like to save some voltage for them. Higher voltage = better: at 700 watts on these hills, I'm huffing and puffing at 8 MPH, but at 900 watts, it's smooth sailing at 10 MPH. I also didn't realize that I often go out with coworkers after work so I put in an order with Juiced for an extra charger for work so I can roll to whatever restaurant/house we're going to instead of taking Lyft. Unfortunately they're sold out of regular chargers but customer service was able to place a special order for me.
  • Out of the box the front disk brake needed adjustment as did the derailleur. I've also got some unevenly pitched motor sound that happens about 50% of the time that I engage the motor. Not sure what's going on there.
  • At about 500 mi, I started getting front disk brake squeal (very loud) that comes and goes and some play in the chain (I think I need to regrease it).
  • It's unfortunate that the electric motor has to be turned on in order for you to use the front light of the bike. I know Tora said that he'd rather people always use the electric assist of the bike because otherwise it feels like a heavy bike, but if this is your only vehicle and you're trying to eke out some extra battery life for a later event (hills, event later that day), it's unsafe to ride with the bike off at night as you can't use the front light. Please add a "Mode 0" to the bike, even if it's disabled by default (have to turn it on in the options)!
Overall I'm very happy with the bike. I would've put about $375 into my car (at IRS rates) plus $144 of parking at this point, so the bike is about 25% done paying for itself, excluding the exercise I'm getting :).

If I were building a future perfect commuter bike for myself, I would use a totally internally geared + protected chain system to reduce the maintenance burden of the bike. If I could somehow protect the brakes too, that would be ideal.
You don't have to rely on juiced for a battery charger and I don't think it should effect the warranty as long as it is a 2 or 3 amp charger. It shouldn't effect the warranty anyway even up to 4 amp with the 17ah battery but you are better off with the slow charge but I would check with juiced. Of course they would rather you buy it from them but pretty much a charger is a charger given it has the right connectors. J.S. You may wanna make sure it's a 48v charger to. And for li ion
 
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