Great plan, poor execution

Jeremy McCreary

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Carlsbad, CA
@m@Robertson and I are both blessed to live and ride often in salty, sandy coastal environments — he in the Monterey, CA area and I in north San Diego County. But he's an accomplished ebike builder with vastly more experience in bike maintence than I have, so I take the tips he shares here seriously. And it always pays.

One such tip was to spray down my drive train after every sandy or salty ride with a cheap hand-pumped garden sprayer while spinning the crank with the bike on its kickstand. Easy, peasy — plain water, no need to dry or relube afterwards. The fan pattern gets the spray into all the right places with surgical precision.

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Here's my SRAM EX1 chain (another tip from the maestro) after 1,200 miles of frequent Coast Highway and beach riding. Nary a speck of rust — and aside from the Robertson rinses, I'm VERY lax about cleaning and lubing my chains. Undetectable stretch per my Park chain gauge.

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HOWEVER, that was the outside of the chain. Here's the harder-to-rinse inside, which I for some reason never thought to spray directly from the side — as I always did with great gusto on the outside. Duh.

Don't get me wrong: I take this as evidence of the effectiveness of the Robertson rinse — provided you give the inside of the chain its due.

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Of course, my neglect of the inside had its consequences: An inside side-plate peeled off one pin on a ride last week while the outside held.

I'd rather not say how far I pushed the bike before realizing that I could throttle my hub-drive home.
 
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I'd rather not say how far I pushed the bike before realizing that I could throttle my hub-drive home.


It gets better - you could have done a linkectomy If you ignored SRAMS advice, split that link, and used it to run the chain shorter for the ride home ( on the smallest rear cog ) . Imagine how much fun it would have been to write the case review:

 
Looks like the spray method can be very effective. Personally I can attest to the "wipe and wet lube" method being total sh*t. Using said method, my original chain only lasted 1500km, and at that point it was stretched beyond 1% by a noticeable amount. I'm going to try waxing my new chain, as that method is said to reduce friction, and greatly increase chain life--we shall see. ;)

 
On a slightly more helpful note, have you considered one of the enclosed chain washing tools but running a solvent that will leave a residue ?

I'm thinking that even if you carefully wash both sides, the important parts of the chain are still going to have salt / rust formation. Maybe split some of those links to see if there's internalrust?
 
ouch!

this is 2,500 miles of riding in san francisco and environs, certainly not all adjacent to salty spray and fog but certainly lots of it, including the occasional ill-advised roll through a salt water puddle/pool on a road or MUP..

this chain got replaced shortly after because it was at .5% elongation, but there was not a speck of rust. i use drip wax, wipe it with a gear wipe (holding the wipe on the chain applies even pressure to both sides) every 100 miles or so, clean with cyclone cleaner every 500 miles or so. i only spray it with water after the cylone cleaning.


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On a slightly more helpful note, have you considered one of the enclosed chain washing tools but running a solvent that will leave a residue ?

I'm thinking that even if you carefully wash both sides, the important parts of the chain are still going to have salt / rust formation. Maybe split some of those links to see if there's internalrust?
I'm replacing the half-rusted chain, so I'll definitely do a series of linkectomies and give it a thorough post-mortem.

Recall, however, that the chain had no detectable stretching at 1,200 miles, and the side I did rinse thoroughly had no rust at all.

I"ll also try to be a little more fastidious in my chain maintenance. Till now, I've been using Rock 'n Roll to clean and lube — but only when the guilt got too much to bear.
 
I'm replacing the half-rusted chain, so I'll definitely do a series of linkectomies and give it a thorough post-mortem.

Recall, however, that the chain had no detectable stretching at 1,200 miles, and the side I did rinse thoroughly had no rust at all.

I"ll also try to be a little more fastidious in my chain maintenance. Till now, I've been using Rock 'n Roll to clean and lube — but only when the guilt got too much to bear.

the lack of “stretch” isn’t surprising since you have the benefit of a hub drive - all that power doesn’t go through the chain. a good illustration that there are other things which destroy chains 😅
 
Here's another method to wax a chain:


I'm Gonna make my own liquid wax too,..

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The pictures of the old-school chain link with the "C-clip" are for reference only,..
I guess that's a single speed chain link.

I figure it would get caught up in a derailleur?
 
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Yeah, Whatever,..
It's just naphtha,..

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I've got a proprietary solvent used to clean bike chains. 😂
 
In 2022 I tried Finish Line teflon dry lube because chain grime was a problem on my clothes and skin. As a lube, it impressed me, but it was very expensive to use because pouring it on the moving chain was wasteful. Besides, I didn't know if I'd lubed every pin. I began using a 25-gauge needle to apply a drop to each end of each pin, using zip ties to mark the chain so I'd know where I was. The task was quick and simple, and a chain required only 3 ml. What's more, squirting it into the applicator bottle let me see the color so I'd know if I'd shaken it enough. Even when applied in tiny drops, the solvent would wick it into the joints and over the surface before evaporating.

I think complaints that it didn't last long came from people who hadn't shaken it enough. It would lubricate and prevent rust for many months. The chain no longer felt gritty. After 18 months and 2,000 miles, I soaked the chain for a couple of hours in gasoline, agitating periodically. I'd put three layers of steel mesh on the bottom of the can so that any grit would settle away from the chain. I hung the chain to dry while giving the stuff in the can more time to settle. I slowly poured off the gas and found that there was no residue at the bottom. Finish Line really seems to repel dirt. Now they make it with boron nitride instead of teflon.

Oh yes... The photo on the left is a "before" picture. I hadn't cleaned the chain, and I probably hadn't lubed it in months. I don't understand how a film that feels waxy can seem to repel dirt the way it repels water.
 

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In 2022 I tried Finish Line teflon dry lube because chain grime was a problem on my clothes and skin.

My chain wax has Teflon and Molybdenum Disulfide in the wax.

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I think complaints that it didn't last long came from people who hadn't shaken it enough.

I'm gonna sterilize my chain real good.



I'd put three layers of steel mesh on the bottom of the can so


I like the steel mesh idea.
I just threw a few nuts and bolts into my jar to make a cavity for debris.
I'm Gunna make it better,..
 
My chain wax has Teflon and Molybdenum Disulfide in the wax.
Finish Line felt like wax where it built up on the rear sprocket wheel of my Radrunner. It didn't feel at all gritty when I scraped it off and squished it between my thumb and forefinger. The first time I applied it with a squeeze bottle and needle, I capped the needle and left the remainder in the bottle. A few months later, most of the solvent was gone, leaving a lump of waxy teflon stuff. The solvent can pass through polyethylene.

After that, I would squirt the remainder back into the original bottle, then fill the applicator bottle with soapy water and squirt it through the needle to prevent clogging. If the original bottle were transparent, I could see if all the solids were dissolved.
 
You people are f*ckin' high.
Buy any chain lube and ride.
If you think for a moment that anything you come up with will make your chain last 30 seconds longer... you can add fool to the equation.

clubself.gif
 
I was trying to find the split link on the bike I'm using now, gave up looking and grabbed a random point, started on it with the chain splitter.
Wouldn't budge, closer look, I was on the split link.
 
I was trying to find the split link on the bike I'm using now, gave up looking and grabbed a random point, started on it with the chain splitter.
Wouldn't budge, closer look, I was on the split link.


My chain didn't have a split link.
There was one link where I could see the mark from the pin being pressed in, so I separated my chain at that link.


You people are f*ckin' high.
Buy any chain lube and ride.
If you think for a moment that anything you come up with will make your chain last 30 seconds longer... you can add fool to the equation.


Wax doesn't stick to the chain if there's any oil on the chain.

I cleaned and rewaxed my chain after a year then cleaned and waxed the chain on my new ebike.

I made some liquid wax too, so I can easily rewax my chains.

I didn't know that you can make your own wax chain lube.

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My chain didn't have a split link.
There was one link where I could see the mark from the pin being pressed in, so I separated my chain at that link.





Wax doesn't stick to the chain if there's any oil on the chain.

I cleaned and rewaxed my chain after a year then cleaned and waxed the chain on my new ebike.

I made some liquid wax too, so I can easily rewax my chains.

I didn't know that you can make your own wax chain lube.

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I stand by my initial statement... You'll be wasting your time. Just buy a reputable lube.


Boeshield T-9® is a bicyclist’s best friend! Waterproof your bike chain, lubricate cables, and prevent rust with our effective all-in-one formula. Works in both wet and dry conditions!
In the world of cycling, few terrains are off limits and endurance is essential, for both rider and equipment. A tough, long-lasting waterproof lubricant is crucial for safety and performance, whether you’re navigating dusty mountain trails or zipping along highways.
Wet, dry or in dirt, serious cyclists rely on one product to clean, lubricate and protect—Boeshield T-9® does it all.
T-9 flushes out dirt and old lubricants, displaces moisture and penetrates moving parts in between the rollers and pins on drive chains, carrying the paraffin formula deep into these areas and coating them thoroughly. T-9 dries to a clean, continuous wax film that performs better than Teflon and lasts up to 200 miles without picking up dust, dirt or mud.

Boeshield T-9® provides chain lubrication and long-term protection in all conditions.Boeshield T-9®’s antirust formula keeps metal parts and gears lubricated, even on the toughest terrain.
Use T-9 on:
Drive Chains
Derailleurs
Control Cables
Brake Cables
Shift Cables
Caliper Pivots
Pedal Pivots
Seat Posts
Spoke Nipples
Inside Frames
Reaches deeper. T-9 stays liquid long enough to permeate metal crevices and seep deep inside assembled components to leave a durable protective coating that lubricates and protects—all without dismantling your equipment.

Completely waterproof. T-9 dries to a clean, waxy, waterproof film that won’t wash off in rain, puddles or mud. You can rinse away sand, dust and grime with water, while leaving the lubricant intact.

One step to long-term protection. Apply T-9 to any metal surface and let it dry. One simple step gives you a thin, penetrating film of durable, waterproof protection and lubrication that endures, month after month, mile after mile.
 
That stuff is expensive.
$36 plus tax.



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It's basically the same thing that I made, and I had all the ingredients.


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